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Thread: Flickstand??

  1. #1
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    Flickstand??

    When I bought my Centurion (used) about 12 years ago, it came with a flickstand (Rhode Gear). It's basically a clamp on the downtube with a wire that folds down to lock the front wheel in place making it really easy to lean the bike on anything with no worries that it will fall over.

    Fast forward to my newly acquired Trek 5000 (again, used) and I've come to realize just how much easier that flickstand makes life. I'm not sure I would want to use one on a carbon bike (maybe it wouldn't hurt, I don't know), but I'd love to find something similar.

    Does anyone know of anything similar to this? Pardon me if this is in the wrong forum or considerd Fredly. I figure I'm already the biggest poseur in town, so that doesn't bother me too much.

    Mark

  2. #2
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    I had a Flickstand (in byegone days) and it was a very handy tool. I think it would be hard to market one these days because there are so many proprietary tube shapes and frame geometries that it would be hard for the flickstand to fit properly.

  3. #3
    sometimereader
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    Quote Originally Posted by dadwhobikes
    When I bought my Centurion (used) about 12 years ago, it came with a flickstand (Rhode Gear). It's basically a clamp on the downtube with a wire that folds down to lock the front wheel in place making it really easy to lean the bike on anything with no worries that it will fall over.

    Does anyone know of anything similar to this? Pardon me if this is in the wrong forum or considerd Fredly. I figure I'm already the biggest poseur in town, so that doesn't bother me too much.
    As I posted back in March:

    I use a gimmick for "parking" my bike. It's simply a big rubber band holding the front brake closed. This pretty much prevents the wheel from rolling - which is the usual cause of a parked bike crashing.

    Flickstand??-bikebrake.jpg

    The rubber band is cut from an old tube. Make it wide enough to provide a good grip on your brake. When not parking, leave the band on your bar - you may have to double it over to ensure it doesn't fall off.

    WTTW - remember to release the brake before trying to roll. BTW, this trick could hinder the grab and go thief.
    Hard work pays off in the future. Laziness pays off now.
    -- Steven Wright

  4. #4
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    Thanks S.T.Rider, that's a really good tip. I don't usually have an issue with this - until the bigger club rides, charity events, etc. The few good "leaning spots" always go quick. I usually just circle slowly or stand holding my bike. . .Man, I can't believe the number o' nice bikes I've watched fall over in that situation. That's when I can use this one!

  5. #5
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    ordinary elastic band

    here's one I use on the workstand and sometimes when parking, using a 2-3inch ordinary rubber band to 'lock' my front wheel.

    1. roll front wheel so valve stem is positioned adjacent to down tube
    2. hook rubber band around valve stem,
    3. stretch free end around down tube,
    4. hook free end around valve stem.

    wheel won't roll. easy, quick, cheap. works with all tube shapes, rim profiles and valve stem lengths, you just have to choose a suitable sized rubber band.
    Who the hell are these children...and why are they calling me "Dad"?

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the two tips. I'll give them a shot.

    I just had an idea of using a piece of styrofoam wedged between the front tube and the front tire. I've got lots of foam laying around from my other obsession and could do some prototyping. Perhaps something that could be made with fiberglass or carbon fiber, which I also have. Not something permanently attached to the bike, but something I could leave in the garage. Now I have something to think about at work today....

  7. #7
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    They dont sell the flickstand? They worked great. People who tour with heavy paniers etc will really vouch for em. They could make em out of carbon nowadays and they would weigh nothing.

  8. #8
    Two scoops of inertia.
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    topeak has one that grabs onto the crank arm end rather than the downtube.
    "Do I need to tell you what the f*ck you can do with an aluminum tube? ALUMINUM!"

  9. #9
    duh...
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    the band over the brake lever is a take on the blackburn stopblock
    vintage part- what is it?

    as previously said, you can gank on the flickstand by running a rubber band around the dt then 'hook' the ends to the valve stem

  10. #10
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    I just lay my bike down, drivetrain up. A lying bike cannot fall.


    Quote Originally Posted by Fantino
    Thanks S.T.Rider, that's a really good tip. I don't usually have an issue with this - until the bigger club rides, charity events, etc. The few good "leaning spots" always go quick. I usually just circle slowly or stand holding my bike. . .Man, I can't believe the number o' nice bikes I've watched fall over in that situation. That's when I can use this one!

  11. #11
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    I used to have a flickstand on all my bikes - here's my old Gitane with the flickstand and other 80's accessories still installed

    FYI - I saw lots of EXPENSIVE bikes laying on their non-drivetrain side at all of the centuries I've been to this summer. Made me nervous at first - then I got used to it and set my Madone down on it's side when a stable "lean support" was not available. No damage from laying it down.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Flickstand??-dsc01461.jpg  

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