Page 3 of 12 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 279

Thread: Gravel Racing

  1. #51
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    108
    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    Wow, it's so interesting you say that and that Marc shared what he did about Niner today. I have literally been thinking for a little while now that I really want to stick ti the bigger brands these days when it comes to carbon (Specialized, Trek, Fuji, Giant, etc.). It was just a gut feeling kind of thing, but I have seen a series of issues of different types as well.
    Salsa has great customer service and stands by their stuff as well. I wouldn't hesitate to get a carbon warbird. So many guys here (Minneapolis) have them.
    I like to ride fast.

  2. #52
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    Quote Originally Posted by marathonrunner View Post
    Salsa has great customer service and stands by their stuff as well. I wouldn't hesitate to get a carbon warbird. So many guys here (Minneapolis) have them.
    Good to know, thanks!
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  3. #53
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    951
    My opinions:
    1. I like a more stable / less racy bike for gravel racing. Low bottom brackets, longer chainstays, slacker head angle. Cross bikes aren't this at all and thus not what I like for gravel racing. YMMV.
    2. I'd consider clearance for 40mm tires a minimum. 45+ is better.
    3. Frame bags, handlebar bags and stem bags are essential for longer rides. You need to carry more food, tools etc than you do on a road ride. These bags vary widely in applicability to gravel racing. The mounting hardware and fit are critical as small variations make a big difference in all day riding.
    4. Internal cables are not my preferred option for gravel racing. More places for water and dirt to enter, more rattling, harder to bodge etc.
    5. Personally, carbon is out for gravel racing. If you race gravel, you are going to thrash your bike: crashes, mud, rocks pinging off the frame etc. I prefer steel and Ti for gravel. Personally. Along the same lines, buy what you can afford to trash. If you're too nervous about damaging your bike in a gravel race, you're missing out on fun
    6. Fenders are often a good idea on many gravel races. I would make sure you can fit them.
    7. Wider bars are really nice on gravel. I use a flared 46 bar.
    8. Tires are critical for gravel. I like tubeless. I like less thread/more slick designs. I prefer sidewall toughness and resistance to cuts to suppleness.
    9. Non bike-specific but I prefer to wear an MTB-style hydration pack while racing gravel. I find using bottles to be a pain in the ass while riding loose stuff. Then I get dehydrated, then I stop riding. Hydration packs make it much easier to keep drinking and eating.
    10. I'll take increased toughness and reliability over saving a pound in bike weight all day, every day when it comes to gravel racing.
    Last edited by Hiro11; 12-06-2017 at 10:36 AM.

  4. #54
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    Quote Originally Posted by Hiro11 View Post
    My opinions:
    1. I like a more stable / less racy bike for gravel racing. Low bottom brackets, longer chainstays, slacker head angle. Cross bikes aren't this at all and thus not what I like for gravel racing. YMMV.
    2. I'd consider clearance for 40mm tires a minimum. 45+ is better.
    3. Frame bags, handlebar bags and stem bags are essential for longer rides. You need to carry more food, tools etc than you do on a road ride. These bags vary widely in applicability to gravel racing. The mounting hardware and fit are critical as small variations make a big difference in all day riding.
    4. Internal cables are not my preferred option for gravel racing. More places for water and dirt to enter, more rattling, harder to bodge etc.
    5. Personally, carbon is out for gravel racing. If you race gravel, you are going to thrash your bike: crashes, mud, rocks pinging off the frame etc. I prefer steel and Ti for gravel. Personally. Along the same lines, buy what you can afford to trash. If you're too nervous about damaging your bike in a gravel race, you're missing out on fun
    6. Fenders are often a good idea on many gravel races. I would make sure you can fit them.
    7. Wider bars are really nice on gravel. I use a flared 46 bar.
    8. Tires are critical for gravel. I like tubeless. I like less thread/more slick designs. I prefer sidewall toughness and resistance to cuts to suppleness.
    9. Non bike-specific but I prefer to wear an MTB-style hydration pack while racing gravel. I find using bottles to be a pain in the ass while riding loose stuff. Then I get dehydrated, then I stop riding. Hydration packs make it much easier to keep eating.
    10. I'll take increased toughness and reliability over saving a pound in bike weight all day, every day when it comes to gravel racing.
    Good stuff, important points to consider. Thanks!
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  5. #55
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    If I ever went with a steel or titanium gravel bike, which I don't know that I will (but I'm open to some degree), it would probably be one of these given the features I prefer (price and looks are the major stumbling blocks for me when it comes to steel and titanium). Out of these I kind of like the the Litespeed and the Routt RSL the best, but the Routt is super expensive. Obvioulsy, the Norco would be the budget option:

    Search XR Steel - Adventure - Adventure - Road - Bikes - Norco Bicycles

    ROUTT RSL - Moots

    https://22bicycles.com/products/drif...nt=33633795466

    https://shop.litespeed.com/collectio...ed-gravel-700c
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 12-06-2017 at 11:01 AM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  6. #56
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  7. #57
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 12-06-2017 at 11:02 AM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  8. #58
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    Here's the Lynskey Pro GR for those that are interested. I don't really like the look much, but the price is solid, definitely not as high as some of the others.

    https://lynskeyperformance.com/road/gravel/pro-gr/
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  9. #59
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    The GR 260 is even more affordable and is better looking IMO:

    https://lynskeyperformance.com/road/gravel/gr-260/

    Press Release: Lynskey Performance releases the GR260 Gravel Bike - Gravel Cyclist: The Gravel Cycling Experience

    The 250 became the 260, but you get the idea:

    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  10. #60
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  11. #61
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,566
    Quote Originally Posted by Hiro11 View Post
    My opinions:
    1. I like a more stable / less racy bike for gravel racing. Low bottom brackets, longer chainstays, slacker head angle. Cross bikes aren't this at all and thus not what I like for gravel racing. YMMV.
    2. I'd consider clearance for 40mm tires a minimum. 45+ is better.
    3. Frame bags, handlebar bags and stem bags are essential for longer rides. You need to carry more food, tools etc than you do on a road ride. These bags vary widely in applicability to gravel racing. The mounting hardware and fit are critical as small variations make a big difference in all day riding.
    4. Internal cables are not my preferred option for gravel racing. More places for water and dirt to enter, more rattling, harder to bodge etc.
    5. Personally, carbon is out for gravel racing. If you race gravel, you are going to thrash your bike: crashes, mud, rocks pinging off the frame etc. I prefer steel and Ti for gravel. Personally. Along the same lines, buy what you can afford to trash. If you're too nervous about damaging your bike in a gravel race, you're missing out on fun
    6. Fenders are often a good idea on many gravel races. I would make sure you can fit them.
    7. Wider bars are really nice on gravel. I use a flared 46 bar.
    8. Tires are critical for gravel. I like tubeless. I like less thread/more slick designs. I prefer sidewall toughness and resistance to cuts to suppleness.
    9. Non bike-specific but I prefer to wear an MTB-style hydration pack while racing gravel. I find using bottles to be a pain in the ass while riding loose stuff. Then I get dehydrated, then I stop riding. Hydration packs make it much easier to keep drinking and eating.
    10. I'll take increased toughness and reliability over saving a pound in bike weight all day, every day when it comes to gravel racing.
    I'm with you on most of this, but definitely disagree on Fenders. Maybe it's just our local terrain, but having fenders is just asking for trouble with debris binding in them, or having to deal with them getting pushed out of shape, or the hardware coming loose. For off-road in general, the less complicated the better. I live in the Pacific Nothwest, where it's wet even when it's not. Id' rather deal with some spray than deal with the fenders themselves.

    Sure, on a commuter or road bike where Im less likely to be dealing with thick mud, or leaves and branches that might jam in a fender, they are great.

    And as far as Carbon Frames goes, there is definitely some concern there, but a well designed carbon gravel bike, along with some added protection (strategically placed helicopter tape, etc...) can help mitigate the chips and things that you might encounter off road. I have a Norco Search with about 6000 gravel miles and other than some scuffs near the dropouts, it still looks nearly new. Norco has experience with mountain bikes, and uses what they call "ArmorLite" technology, which is basically a harder resin that is more impact resistant than what is typically used. Carbon Fiber's durability is largely determined by the bikes design/engineering, and the matrix' used to suspend the fibers. It can be just as impervious to impact damage is a metal bike if properly designed. It's used in aviation, where high speed small object impacts are common (especailly on take-off and landing), and performs just fine.

    I'm not saying that Carbon is a better material in every case, but I wouldn't dismiss is completely out of hand either.

  12. #62
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    I'm with you on most of this, but definitely disagree on Fenders. Maybe it's just our local terrain, but having fenders is just asking for trouble with debris binding in them, or having to deal with them getting pushed out of shape, or the hardware coming loose. For off-road in general, the less complicated the better. I live in the Pacific Nothwest, where it's wet even when it's not. Id' rather deal with some spray than deal with the fenders themselves.

    Sure, on a commuter or road bike where Im less likely to be dealing with thick mud, or leaves and branches that might jam in a fender, they are great.

    And as far as Carbon Frames goes, there is definitely some concern there, but a well designed carbon gravel bike, along with some added protection (strategically placed helicopter tape, etc...) can help mitigate the chips and things that you might encounter off road. I have a Norco Search with about 6000 gravel miles and other than some scuffs near the dropouts, it still looks nearly new. Norco has experience with mountain bikes, and uses what they call "ArmorLite" technology, which is basically a harder resin that is more impact resistant than what is typically used. Carbon Fiber's durability is largely determined by the bikes design/engineering, and the matrix' used to suspend the fibers. It can be just as impervious to impact damage is a metal bike if properly designed. It's used in aviation, where high speed small object impacts are common (especailly on take-off and landing), and performs just fine.

    I'm not saying that Carbon is a better material in every case, but I wouldn't dismiss is completely out of hand either.
    That's basically what I have found to be the reality that is hard to ignore. Well designed carbon bikes are raced in MTB races. From XC to marathon to downhill they are used and seem to hold up fine for the most part. Carbon bikes are used in cyclocross, including the brutal conditions in Belgium with its mud, sand, and crashes on almost every lap sometimes and they hold up fine for the most part. Carbon bikes have been used in every major gravel race and not only survive, but find their way to the podium regularly. It is what it is, but yeah if you want the added peace of mind and/or insurance against a crack or failure of some kind, you can go Ti or steel too (which isn't necessarily crazy if you are spending a couple of thousand on a new bike). There really aren't any wrong answers here when it comes to frame material. Fenders are a big meh to me for actual races, I haven't seen many people using them in the races I have watched online, but the option to add them for a training ride or rainstorm is probably a nice feature.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  13. #63
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    That being said, I am starting to like this one a bit.

    Gravel Racing-lynskeygr260-2017-6.jpg
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 12-06-2017 at 01:49 PM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  14. #64
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    108
    Agree on the cx geo not being ideal for fast gravel descents. Also agreed on the wider bars- I use 44cm on the gravel bike and 42cm on my road bike.

    I do care about weight and speed. Therefore, no fenders, narrowest lightest tubeless tires I can get away with, definitely didn't want a steel frame.

    Carbon and ti are too $$ for me. Too many hills here to go 1x. You do see some people using fenders during D2R2, but you see people on everything during that ride.
    I like to ride fast.

  15. #65
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    Hunt 4Season Gravel Disc and Clement Ushuaia wheels seem like solid options with a reasonable price and weight. What others do you guys like? Do you have any favorite 700cc 29er wheels that would be a good option for a gravel race?

    Review: Clement Ushuaia Gravel Wheelset - Gravel Cyclist: The Gravel Cycling Experience

    Wheel Review: Hunt Four Season Gravel Disc Wheelset - Gravel Cyclist: The Gravel Cycling Experience

    Also, what are some of your favorite 40mm or wider tires?
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  16. #66
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,566
    So I'm in the market for a replacement for my 2015 Norco Search. It's a great bike, but it's limited on tire clearance to about 38mm. Much less if I put fenders on it. THere were a few times last year where I really would have preferred something in the 42-45mm range.


    I'm tall. I ride a 60cm/61cm frame, and use either 175mm or 180mm cranks, and would likely not opt for a 650b wheel, although I might consider it with a really fat tire.

    Right now, I'm considering some of the bikes in this thread.


    • Norco Search XR (much lower cost than most of the other options)
    • Lynskey GR Series (I like the looks of these, but really want to buy from a local dealer)
    • Salsa Warbird
    • 3T Exploro (I've kinda eliminated this based on some bad experiences a couple of friends had with them)
    • Semi-custom Ti or Carbon (Moots/Sage/Parlee/Seven, etc...)


    There are probably others. I need to make the rounds of the local shops and see what all of my options are.

    Right now, it's probably down to the Search XR, which I can buy as a frameset and migrate my existing components to, or the Salsa Warbird. I haven't talked to the dealer about prices and ordering options on these yet.

  17. #67
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    So I'm in the market for a replacement for my 2015 Norco Search. It's a great bike, but it's limited on tire clearance to about 38mm. Much less if I put fenders on it. THere were a few times last year where I really would have preferred something in the 42-45mm range.


    I'm tall. I ride a 60cm/61cm frame, and use either 175mm or 180mm cranks, and would likely not opt for a 650b wheel, although I might consider it with a really fat tire.

    Right now, I'm considering some of the bikes in this thread.


    • Norco Search XR (much lower cost than most of the other options)
    • Lynskey GR Series (I like the looks of these, but really want to buy from a local dealer)
    • Salsa Warbird
    • 3T Exploro (I've kinda eliminated this based on some bad experiences a couple of friends had with them)
    • Semi-custom Ti or Carbon (Moots/Sage/Parlee/Seven, etc...)


    There are probably others. I need to make the rounds of the local shops and see what all of my options are.

    Right now, it's probably down to the Search XR, which I can buy as a frameset and migrate my existing components to, or the Salsa Warbird. I haven't talked to the dealer about prices and ordering options on these yet.
    Obviously the Search XR and Warbird are on my shortlist. If you are comfortable with or prefer carbon, those two are tough to beat for what you get. I think I like the Search XR a little more due to some of the added features they built in. If you want Titanium, I like Moots and Lynskey. Maybe you can get wheels and components from a local shop if you go with them. My pre test ride reworked final three are:

    1) Specialized Diverge

    2) Lynskey GR 260

    3) Norco Search XR Carbon or Steel

    I am going to continue taking my time to compare these three finalists and the possibly pull the trigger sometime after the new year.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  18. #68
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,566
    I just took a quick scan of Moot's offerings

    The only bike that really interests me would be the Moots Routt 45

    Routt 45 - Moots

    Good tire clearance, flat mount disc brakes, etc...

    I'm not sure the extra cost over something like the Linskey's is really worth it. I don't have any dramatic custom frame requirements, so it's hard to justify the extra cost.

  19. #69
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    I just took a quick scan of Moot's offerings

    The only bike that really interests me would be the Moots Routt 45

    Routt 45 - Moots

    Good tire clearance, flat mount disc brakes, etc...

    I'm not sure the extra cost over something like the Linskey's is really worth it. I don't have any dramatic custom frame requirements, so it's hard to justify the extra cost.
    Thatís pretty much how I feel as well, especially after recently buying a smart trainer and two road bikes (alloy crit & disc equipped carbon gran fondo/group ride bikes). I need to go easy on the price with this one. My final three all fall in a range I feel comfortable with and have the features I am looking for but are unique in their own way. The Lynskey is a really tough one not to get from where I am sitting right now.

    I just need to figure out how much I would ride it and to do what. That will help me decide how big to go.

  20. #70
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,566
    At this point, unless I can find a really good deal on a Salsa Warbird (unlikely), I'm just going to get the Search XR Frameset and transfer my Ultegra Di2 over to it.

    I'll need to get new adapters for the front hubs (old Search is 15mm and the new one is 12mm). I get a pretty nice discount from the shop that sells these. It's the best/safest/cheapest option to get the most bike for my money.

    I might even be able to recoup some of the cost by selling my old Search frameset.

  21. #71
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    At this point, unless I can find a really good deal on a Salsa Warbird (unlikely), I'm just going to get the Search XR Frameset and transfer my Ultegra Di2 over to it.

    I'll need to get new adapters for the front hubs (old Search is 15mm and the new one is 12mm). I get a pretty nice discount from the shop that sells these. It's the best/safest/cheapest option to get the most bike for my money.

    I might even be able to recoup some of the cost by selling my old Search frameset.
    That makes sense and seems like a good choice. Keep us updated.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  22. #72
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    FWIW, the carbon Warbird frameset is the same price as the Search XR reportedly:

    Salsa 2018 Warbird Carbon Frameset in Tree Fort Bikes Cross/Gravel

    https://www.joe-bike.com/product/sal...t-228296-1.htm
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  23. #73
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    An interesting discussion on wheel size options:

    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  24. #74
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    6,048
    For those looking for a true budget buy, it's almost impossible to beat the Fuji Jari. It can fit 45mm 700cc tires and is compatible with 650b out of the box. You can often get one of these things at Performance Bike for under $1000. You will probably need to add hydro shifters and brakes, but you can't beat what you are getting for the price. I tested one about 6 months or so ago and, to be honest, with the extra large tires (I think it came with 38mm tires), it felt like I was on a much more expensive bike. It accelerated fine and handled well too. It's not a light bike by any stretch of the imagination, but what metal gravel bikes are? They are definitely worth checking out if you want something you won't feel guilty about beating up or need to get a gravel bike for as little as possible. The frameset is like $650, which is ridiculous. Lots of versatility and upgrade potential in an affordable package.

    https://www.bikerumor.com/2016/05/05...vel-road-bike/

    Fuji Bikes | Jari 1.7

    https://www.bikerumor.com/2017/03/23...ck-everywhere/

    https://pelotonmagazine.com/gear/fuj...budget-badass/
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 12-07-2017 at 08:14 AM.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  25. #75
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    951
    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    I'm with you on most of this, but definitely disagree on Fenders. Maybe it's just our local terrain, but having fenders is just asking for trouble with debris binding in them, or having to deal with them getting pushed out of shape, or the hardware coming loose. For off-road in general, the less complicated the better. I live in the Pacific Nothwest, where it's wet even when it's not. Id' rather deal with some spray than deal with the fenders themselves.

    Sure, on a commuter or road bike where Im less likely to be dealing with thick mud, or leaves and branches that might jam in a fender, they are great.
    I agree with all of this. My point was more that there are situations where you might want to mount fenders on this type of bike. When buying this type of bike, you might want to take that into consideration when considering braze-ons, tire clearance etc.

    I'm not saying that Carbon is a better material in every case, but I wouldn't dismiss is completely out of hand either.
    Yeah, my preference for metal frames is just that: a personal preference. I get that lots of people use carbon frames in extremely rugged environments (DH racing, for example) without issue. It's more that in considering the totality of factors I look for in a gravel bike (smooth ride, affordability, toughness, threaded BB, impact resistance) steel and TI are a better fit, for me.

Page 3 of 12 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Gravel Bike wheel q: Stan's ArchEX on gravel bike
    By stuarttx in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-23-2017, 06:53 PM
  2. Gravel Grinding: There is about to be more gravel to ride...
    By Erik_A in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-13-2016, 04:42 AM
  3. Tubeless pressure for gravel racing?
    By namaSSte in forum Cyclocross
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-13-2016, 09:01 PM
  4. Perfect wheel & tire for gravel road racing - your thoughts?
    By Gobiking12344 in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-23-2013, 06:36 AM
  5. 47 minutes of French pro's racing on gravel
    By Creakyknees in forum Pro Cycling - Tour de France
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-12-2012, 10:29 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •