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  1. #1
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    Hello, newish to road cycling

    Hello, im new to the forum and kinda new to road cycling. i use to ride long time ago then i got into a motorcycle accident and had to have my radial head replaced. Anyways i bought my first new bike. Fuji Grand Fondo. full shimano 105 and disk brakes.
    started off just doing 10 miles, now able to do 34-40 miles at a time with a average speed of 13 max 24

    BUT when im spinning my knee's tend to hurt so i assume my fit is off.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hello, newish to road cycling-17342650_10155149370199100_5856588792709464828_n.jpg   Hello, newish to road cycling-17352058_10155149370189100_6243158920726884903_n.jpg  

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cmrenninger View Post
    BUT when im spinning my knee's tend to hurt so i assume my fit is off.

    Could be. It also could be, at least in part, your cadence (aka revolutions per min.)
    Most newish cyclist have a natural instinct to pedal HARDER when they want to go faster. I know I did.
    Try to develop the mindset to pedal FASTER when you want to go faster.

    Do you happen to know what you're cadence is? What's good is a person to person thing but very generally speaking if it's below 80 it might be something to work on.

    I don't mention that to suggest looking there as a substitute to making sure you're fit is right on though. 'In addition' to making sure fit is good.

  3. #3
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    I concur with Jay said on fit and cadence.

    Did your bike shop do a fitting when they sold you the bike? A good bike shop will put you and your new bike on their trainer, watch you pedal and make adjustments to dial in your fit just right. If your bike shop didn't do this, they are not worth your business.

    If you bought the bike off the internet, you can still have a bike shop perform this service, but it will probably cost you around $100-200. It is well worth the cost.
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  4. #4
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    A picture of your bike doesn't show anything. A picture of you on your bike shows a bit. A video pedaling would show a lot more.

  5. #5
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    Your knee hurts because your road bike has disk brakes.

  6. #6
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    Take it back to lbs if you can. Otherwise, look for fitting instructions on line. GCN'S video is good. Don't overlook cleat placement and simple things like the seat not being level (can't quite tell from the pic). Finally, there's a small chance the crank is too long for you.

  7. #7
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    funny. you don't look newish.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cmrenninger View Post
    Hello, im new to the forum and kinda new to road cycling. i use to ride long time ago then i got into a motorcycle accident and had to have my radial head replaced. Anyways i bought my first new bike. Fuji Grand Fondo. full shimano 105 and disk brakes.
    started off just doing 10 miles, now able to do 34-40 miles at a time with a average speed of 13 max 24

    BUT when im spinning my knee's tend to hurt so i assume my fit is off.
    Yep, that saddle is tilted down. Your weight is constantly sliding forward onto your arms and knees. You should be able to sit up on the saddle and not fall forward. Level that saddle. Might have to lower it a little.

    The other thing: rotate the brake levers down slightly. That'll give more space for the arms to absorb shocks with the hands on a level surface perpendicular to the vertical direction of the shocks. I bet your arms and hands hurt too, right?

    On a level saddle rider can sit up and balance fore-aft. He can also lean forward without upsetting that balance, because upper body is now counterbalanced by the legs turning the crank. The knees won't hurt, either. You'll enjoy how well spinning recovers the knees from the hard efforts, quite the opposite of what you're experiencing.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by charliethetuna View Post
    funny. you don't look newish.
    That's all we need, a newish princess.

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