Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 59
  1. #26
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    428
    PBL450,

    I guess this is the conundrum I face every time I walk in and pick out which bike I am going to ride. I stare at my latest whizzbang high-tech rides, yet somehow I keep pulling the 25 yr old Colnago Technos off its rack and throwing my leg over it. Guess I am bad for business, lol. Now, with my older helmets (4-8 years), I am going to start entering them back into wearing rotation as I realize I've been foolish all these years replacing them every three years. Within a decade period (and most probably longer), EPS or any of its variants simply does not break down at all when a helmet has been properly cared for and not crashed. It's more likely some other part of the helmet will fail first (a worn out strap, plastic retainer, etc, etc) before the helmet's EPS becomes unsafe to ride.

  2. #27
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: ibericb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    4,578
    Your helmets are probably fine if they've been properly cared for. But, it's not just the EPS. It's also the outer shell material, the straps, and those little plastic retainers. All are necessary for the helmet to function properly. I suspect the most likely component to fail are the retainer clips, but that's a complete SWAG.
    "When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments."
    -Elizabeth Howard West

    Never use your face as a brake pad.
    -Jake Watson

  3. #28
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    548
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    From a profit standpoint, the manufacturer wants you to buy a new helmet sooner rather than later... It's good business. From a safety standpoint the manufacturer wants you to buy a new helmet sooner rather than later to ensure that you are wearing a melon guard that boasts the latest and greatest advances in technology. Too old is last decades tech... Even if only minor changes show up to be improvements they would prefer you have that advantage.
    The only advance in technology in bike helmets in the last 10 years has been MIPS, and it remains to be seen if it is hype or not and if more manufacturers will adopt it.

  4. #29
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    3,619
    Quote Originally Posted by mfdemicco View Post
    The only advance in technology in bike helmets in the last 10 years has been MIPS, and it remains to be seen if it is hype or not and if more manufacturers will adopt it.
    Like I said... Even if something very minor is improved they want you to have that improvement. The same applies to other safety oriented products. Getting older stuff out of the game in favor of newer stuff is what they are after. This is the case in a ton of industries. Manufacturer assumes the worst and makes recommendations based on worst case scenario. You leave your helmet in your 120+ car and never clean anything, you have hit it on the ground at least once, and they think they improved the buckle last year... Maybe they even considered a recall for something that happened and they are biting their nails? It's not rocket science. And, of course, there is the profit bonus.

    I'm not saying old helmets aren't able to do their job, I'm telling you what the manufacturers are thinking.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  5. #30
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: ibericb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    4,578
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    I'm not saying old helmets aren't able to do their job, I'm telling you what the manufacturers are thinking.
    I think they're more concerned about plaintiff's attorneys when you are are seriously injured or killed as a result of head trauma, and were wearing one of their helmets.
    "When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments."
    -Elizabeth Howard West

    Never use your face as a brake pad.
    -Jake Watson

  6. #31
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    3,619
    Quote Originally Posted by ibericb View Post
    I think they're more concerned about plaintiff's attorneys when you are are seriously injured or killed as a result of head trauma, and were wearing one of their helmets.
    No. Having been a safety inspector, you might be surprised that people would actually like you to be safe. Yes, they have a stake in that, no doubt... But I also worked with tons of people who actually wanted their workers to be safe... Not everything comes down to the lawsuit liability. And if that's the way you want to live your life, good luck bro. But you are less of a minority than you think... As a housing inspector of many years you might be shocked to know that property owners would like tenants to be safe. And yes, I am not an idiot, there are slum lords... But they are 1 in 100. Most people are just trying to make a living like everyone else. And they don't want anyone to get hurt toward that end. Sure, I am applying the same logic I learned in the field to cycling helmets, but I think it's perfectly transferable... I worked with a few awful property owners, but I worked with a ton of great ones. People who balanced long term profitability with safety and health. If you only see the world through lawyer colored glasses I feel for you. I don't want to live like that...
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  7. #32
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: ibericb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    4,578
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    No. Having been a safety inspector, you might be surprised that people would actually like you to be safe. Yes, they have a stake in that, no doubt... But I also worked with tons of people who actually wanted their workers to be safe... Not everything comes down to the lawsuit liability. And if that's the way you want to live your life, good luck bro. But you are less of a minority than you think... As a housing inspector of many years you might be shocked to know that property owners would like tenants to be safe. And yes, I am not an idiot, there are slum lords... But they are 1 in 100. Most people are just trying to make a living like everyone else. And they don't want anyone to get hurt toward that end. Sure, I am applying the same logic I learned in the field to cycling helmets, but I think it's perfectly transferable... I worked with a few awful property owners, but I worked with a ton of great ones. People who balanced long term profitability with safety and health. If you only see the world through lawyer colored glasses I feel for you. I don't want to live like that...
    To be sure, there are many (if not most) in the world who want to see everyone safe and sound at all times. I generally hold that view. I am certain that is at the heart of places like the Snell Foundation. But a commercial corporate policy, warning and admonishing that your helmet needs to be replaced every three years is, I suspect, driven by the desire to mitigate product liability. Ask yourself two questions:

    1. If it weren't for product liability issues, well established in American law, would those recommendations be so advanced; would the stickers noting the need to be replaced in three years be applied to helmets and/or their packaging?

    2. If a company like Specialized wanted to assure you were safe, why do they limit their crash replacement discount (20% at Specialized) to helmets less than 3 years old?
    "When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments."
    -Elizabeth Howard West

    Never use your face as a brake pad.
    -Jake Watson

  8. #33
    I love to climb!
    Reputation: Jwiffle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,890
    Quote Originally Posted by ibericb View Post

    2. If a company like Specialized wanted to assure you were safe, why do they limit their crash replacement discount (20% at Specialized) to helmets less than 3 years old?
    Precisely TO assure you were safe. By limiting the discount to three years, it encourages you to buy a new, supposedly safer helmet within three years.
    Stop in at Element Sports. www.elementsport.com
    Get Out! Have Fun!

  9. #34
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: ibericb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    4,578
    Quote Originally Posted by Jwiffle View Post
    Precisely TO assure you were safe. By limiting the discount to three years, it encourages you to buy a new, supposedly safer helmet within three years.
    Then why don't they extend the 20% discount to those replacing a good (not crashed) current Specialized helmet less than 3 years old with a new Specialized helmet? If they truly wanted to keep everyone safe, they would extend that policy to good helmet replacement before expiration, and not limit it to just crash replacement. Of course you could slam your good helmet on some pavement, falsely claim crash damage, then take it in for replacement.
    "When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments."
    -Elizabeth Howard West

    Never use your face as a brake pad.
    -Jake Watson

  10. #35
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    3,619
    Quote Originally Posted by ibericb View Post
    To be sure, there are many (if not most) in the world who want to see everyone safe and sound at all times. I generally hold that view. I am certain that is at the heart of places like the Snell Foundation. But a commercial corporate policy, warning and admonishing that your helmet needs to be replaced every three years is, I suspect, driven by the desire to mitigate product liability. Ask yourself two questions:

    1. If it weren't for product liability issues, well established in American law, would those recommendations be so advanced; would the stickers noting the need to be replaced in three years be applied to helmets and/or their packaging?

    2. If a company like Specialized wanted to assure you were safe, why do they limit their crash replacement discount (20% at Specialized) to helmets less than 3 years old?
    Of course their attorneys write their warnings and their job is to protect their employer from damages resulting from litigation in the situations you mention... That is their job. But that doesn't mean the warning is limited to protection from lawsuits. It means it was written by a lawyer... The manufacturer wants the product to do its job as best it can.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  11. #36
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: ibericb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    4,578
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    ... The manufacturer wants the product to do its job as best it can.
    Absolutely. Having worked for a very large industrial manufacturing company for many years, I can attest to that fact. They do want the product to work as intended.
    "When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments."
    -Elizabeth Howard West

    Never use your face as a brake pad.
    -Jake Watson

  12. #37
    Shuffleman
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    678
    I recently struggled with this as my helmet is 6 yrs old and pretty faded. I normally error on the side of caution but feel like this is partly marketing hype and partly liability focused.
    I live in Florida and keep my helmet in the garage. I also clean it by tossing it and my gloves into my pool after a ride. This is probably why it is faded. Either way, I bought a new helmet a few weeks ago just in case. I did keep the old one and use it for mtb now, which probably makes no sense.
    I guess that we all have to do what we feel is right. I don't spend a terrible amount on a helmet and it is not going to hurt me financially to buy one ever few years so I think that I will probably do just that. I will probably not count the days but I will be cautious within reason.

  13. #38
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    3,619
    Quote Originally Posted by ibericb View Post
    Absolutely. Having worked for a very large industrial manufacturing company for many years, I can attest to that fact. They do want the product to work as intended.
    And of course, the lawyers are there to protect them...
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  14. #39
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    31
    Referring back to Motorcycle helmets: I've always replaced them around 5 years or so. It falls on the Snell approval cycle which, coincidentally, the latest Snell approval is commonly the requirement for many local racetracks.
    I find, however, after 5 years the helmet may look find but the fit has changed. It's far more noticeable on a motorcycle helmet having it able to wiggle more than it used to.

    Quick link to Shoei's site (motorcycle helmet manufacturer) doesn't list "date" as a determining factor for helmet replacement. They do, however, note a 5-year warranty. I would consider motorcycle helmets to be subject to more demanding conditions than a bicycle helmet due to higher speeds and requirements to meet tougher standards.
    SHOEI North America | Safety-Sizing, Handling, And Care


    My bicycle helmet is a 10 year old Luis Garneau. Fit is getting loose but I've not crashed it - i'll consider a replacement soonish.

  15. #40
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: ibericb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    4,578
    When should I replace my helmet?

    The answer is , it depends. Apparently most manufacturers currently use 5 years. Bell appears to be the exception.
    "When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments."
    -Elizabeth Howard West

    Never use your face as a brake pad.
    -Jake Watson

  16. #41
    Pay heed people
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    544
    Solution - ride crits and replace your helmet whenever you crash. You're almost guaranteed to never have a helmet last more than 2-3 years.

  17. #42
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,297
    Look on the back of any shampoo bottle -- what do you see for directions -- lather, rinse, repeat. If you were a shampoo manufacturer wouldn't you do the same thing? Kind of the same thing with helmets, except they use that safety angle, which is probably more effective than a dandruff problem.

  18. #43
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    55
    Thanks, found this thread trying to find that link I remembered I saw it somewhere. I think it's darn funny that some in this thread expect companies to care less about money than the people using the helmet.
    Quote Originally Posted by mfdemicco View Post

  19. #44
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    4,931
    Let me just start by saying that I dismiss most conspiracy theories. This includes the one about helmet manufacturers putting expiration stickers on helmets for the sole purpose of getting us to buy new helmets. If there is a non-scientific motive behind the expiration dates, I would have to say it is protection from liability.

    The problem with aging helmets and ones that are subjected to extended extremes of temperature, is the hardening of the foam surface that rests against your head. The harder it becomes, the less it will absorb impact in a crash. I have read that one way to test a helmet to see if it is still good is to stick your fingernail in the foam surface. If you can penetrate it, it is still good. If not, it needs to be replaced. I don't know how true that is, but it's worth mentioning.

    Conspiracy or not, I would rather be safe than sorry.

    This all being said, you are vastly better off with an old helmet than no helmet.

  20. #45
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    7
    The Helmets: Bicycle Helmets site has very interesting information not biased either by company hype or other such influences. They found even dramatic mistreatment like gasoline that showed major apparent damage did not cause the helmet to fail a spec test. Sweat and body oils had zero effects, and other things like bug screen, DEET, sunscreen also did not cause consequential damage. 8 year old helmets that do not show damage or cracks probably are fine. Note, the new MIPS feature has not been shown to give more protection, so sales prices on nonMIPS helmets that are solid brands now may be a great way to save, and if you don't need one, just stick it in a closet, where zero aging effects should be incurred until you start using it. Helmet tech has not improved significantly and many designs are odd, weird, square style embellishments rather than functional protection, and pricey ones are not better than mid-priced units.

  21. #46
    Neophyte
    Reputation: jetdog9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,324
    Quote Originally Posted by MMsRepBike View Post
    Well let me put it to you like this:

    The owner of our shop does his diligence and tells every customer pretty much that helmets are only good for 2 or 3 years. He points them to the statements provided by the manufacturers and then does his best to sell them a new helmet. He will tell anyone who will listen and even those that won't that helmets need regular replacement.


    He wears a 2008 Giro Atmos, it's the only helmet he owns.
    Would rep this but not allowed.

  22. #47
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Srode's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,594
    For what it's worth, when I used to road race motorcycles, riders were required to use helmets manufactured not more than 5 years prior to the race they were participating in and that was checked when you took your bike through tech inspection.
    Moderation is boring - do epic s##t

    Trek Domane
    Niner RLT9 (Gravel Bike)
    Trek Crockett

  23. #48
    Fecal indicator
    Reputation: Oxtox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    9,387
    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    For what it's worth, when I used to road race motorcycles, riders were required to use helmets manufactured not more than 5 years prior to the race they were participating in and that was checked when you took your bike through tech inspection.
    what's the similarity of construction between moto and cycling helmets...?

    guessing they're significantly different.
    the 45th POTUS is inept, corrupt, and a pathological liar. and those may be his better qualities...

  24. #49
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Srode's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,594
    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    what's the similarity of construction between moto and cycling helmets...?

    guessing they're significantly different.
    pretty much the same materials, eps foam and polycarbonate shell

  25. #50
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    91
    Since this thread is over 2 years old I wonder how many helmets forum readers have replaced since the original post.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Hammer HEED expiration/best by date
    By octobahn in forum Racing, Training, Nutrition, Triathlons
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-29-2012, 06:26 PM
  2. Furthest past the slash... or past expiration date
    By funknuggets in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 01-14-2010, 04:09 AM
  3. Today is Radar's expiration date.
    By firstrax in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 02-27-2008, 03:23 AM
  4. Expiration date for Performance 20% discount code?
    By loosecannon in forum Hot Deals
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-16-2005, 07:58 AM
  5. How long is GU good for after expiration date?
    By filly in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-01-2004, 09:33 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •