Page 3 of 11 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 269
  1. #51
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,936
    Quote Originally Posted by ceugene View Post
    It honestly doesn't take that much more time.
    unless you're in a major hurry!

  2. #52
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    409
    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    unless you're in a major hurry!
    I bet I could change my TA as fast or faster than you can change your QR. In fact, I wouldn’t even have to worry about getting the right clamping pressure on the dropout right since it’s really just a lag bolt.

    And again, the part you ignored. Important team members would just be able to swap bikes in most cases.

  3. #53
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,936
    Quote Originally Posted by ceugene View Post
    I bet I could change my TA as fast or faster than you can change your QR. In fact, I wouldn’t even have to worry about getting the right clamping pressure on the dropout right since it’s really just a lag bolt.

    And again, the part you ignored. Important team members would just be able to swap bikes in most cases.
    Simmer down Rambo....

    My thought of it taking longer is not the quick release or thru axle, it's getting the rotor between the pads quickly which can be difficult, as I said when in a hurry.

  4. #54
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    409
    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    Simmer down Rambo....

    My thought of it taking longer is not the quick release or thru axle, it's getting the rotor between the pads quickly which can be difficult, as I said when in a hurry.
    The axle ends slide nicely into integrated guides at the dropouts. Round-edged rotors make it even easier. A complete non-issue which has nothing specifically to do with rear wheels.

    Again, nothing to say about contenders simply being able to swap bikes in most cases?

  5. #55
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,936
    Quote Originally Posted by ceugene View Post
    Again, nothing to say about contenders simply being able to swap bikes in most cases?
    Yes I agree, swapping bikes would likely be faster overall, maybe.

  6. #56
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    253
    ...ahhnd, we've morphed into, guess what, a disc break thread! OP, I hope you'll try again next year.

  7. #57
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: BCSaltchucker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,897
    I'm not even going to post in this thread
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  8. #58
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    Simmer down Rambo....

    My thought of it taking longer is not the quick release or thru axle, it's getting the rotor between the pads quickly which can be difficult, as I said when in a hurry.
    The brakes pads already have a beveled edge to help guide the rotor in. The pads could easily be modified or manufactured to let the rotor slide straight in with a wide margin of error.

    If a sportbike can have a rear wheel changed in 5 seconds in the Daytona 200 surely we can do better with bicycles. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=MkhH3nl0glc

    I like disc brakes but banning rim would be stupid. I feel like the top level of racing should also be about designing better equipment devolped by the worlds best riders. If thats rim brakes so be it.

  9. #59
    Forever a Student
    Reputation: MMsRepBike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    4,963
    Quote Originally Posted by Fajita Dave View Post
    I feel like the top level of racing should also be about designing better equipment devolped by the worlds best riders. If thats rim brakes so be it.
    Time to wash your mouth out with soap.
    use a torque wrench

  10. #60
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,936
    Quote Originally Posted by Fajita Dave View Post
    The brakes pads already have a beveled edge to help guide the rotor in. The pads could easily be modified or manufactured to let the rotor slide straight in with a wide margin of error.
    what type of easy mod would allow a wide margin of error?

  11. #61
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,936
    Changing a wheel with the bike wheels down is tough especially if the rider stands over the top tube, add in disc brakes and trying to do it fast while getting the chain right is gonna be a wee bit tougher.

    Rear wheel changes during a race have always been difficult, even with rim brakes.

    When I have a flat, I always flip the bike over.

    Even in the garage, I'll take the bike out of the stand and flip it over to put the rear wheel back on.

  12. #62
    Banned forever.....or not
    Reputation: MR_GRUMPY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    23,982
    And waiting for a team car only takes a few seconds....right?
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
    .
    How would you like it if Hitler killed you
    Dogbert.

    I>U

    Buying parts to hang on your bike is always easier than getting fit.

    If you feel wimpy and weak, get out and train more, ya wee lassie!

    If Jesus had a gun, he'd be alive today!

  13. #63
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,749
    Speaking of wheel changes for those of us that don't have a team car following us around most of the time, or a pro bike mechanic addressing spongy braking action...and of course we have discussed the pros and cons of disc versus rim brakes ad infinitum....to me aside from a few grams, a handful of watts at speeds I generally don't ride...and yes there is cost diff which I can fortunately afford...so what is the biggest reason I don't ride disc brakes on the road? Maintenance relative to not needing the additional braking strength because I live in flat country. Now if living in an environment with even moderate elevation change, I would suck up the more fiddly nature of disc brakes and ride a road bike with disc brakes.

    I know many will and have come here and say disc brake maintenance isn't that big a deal....or....they just drop the bike off at the shop and let them deal with it...which is fine of course. And why would a guy like me with my background... I change the brakes on my cars...past motorcycles etc...so why the big deal then? For me if given a choice, I prefer simplicity if I don't need something because life is already complicated enough. For example, I collect dive watches and I won't own a mechanical watch...when that in some cases is all collectors will own. I don't want to be bothered with winding a watch or setting the time as modern solar and battery quartz watches are so accurate.

    Anyway, this is a great review of disc brake maintenance for those interested with some clever tips. To me, a stark contrast to setting up and maintaining rim brakes which are comparatively more simple which allows bike maintenance to be directed toward other areas of the bike.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQ_oIAPuQR8
    Last edited by 11spd; 01-04-2018 at 05:11 AM.

  14. #64
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    what type of easy mod would allow a wide margin of error?
    Only the brake pad material has a slight bevel to guide the rotor in. The back plate is still flat to hang up the rotor. Just file a slight beveled edge on it.

    If its really such a big deal for pros I'm sure the manufactures could design the pads or the caliper to guide the rotor in seamlessly. Which would then trickle down to us.

  15. #65
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,749
    Quote Originally Posted by Fajita Dave View Post
    Only the brake pad material has a slight bevel to guide the rotor in. The back plate is still flat to hang up the rotor. Just file a slight beveled edge on it.

    If its really such a big deal for pros I'm sure the manufactures could design the pads or the caliper to guide the rotor in seamlessly. Which would then trickle down to us.
    Thing about beveling pads is..it cuts down marginally on surface area contact between pad and rotor. Weight is a clear factor in brake design which includes pad surface area and piston size and of course rotor size.

    That said, I believe disc brake design...like the evolution of rim brakes that has made them so far superior to rim brakes of even 10 years ago...this evolution will continue to make wheel changes more seamless. The caliper itself could be ramped and shingle brake pads for example to guide the rotor in without pad contact. No doubt there were will be further improvements...just like there have been of most recent hydro disc brakes.

  16. #66
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,978
    Quote Originally Posted by MR_GRUMPY View Post
    And waiting for a team car only takes a few seconds....right?
    there are many instances where a climb is long and road is a tad narrow, and the only immediate service is a neutral motorcycle. The team car could be a way back.

  17. #67
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,749
    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    there are many instances where a climb is long and road is a tad narrow, and the only immediate service is a neutral motorcycle. The team car could be a way back.
    The team car maybe back but not typically the supporting team which wll sacrifice a bike from lesser team member. They pretty much ride the same pedals for this contingency and even know by rider size the best bike to substitute...most teams even riding the same model bike.

    Of course when something like this comes up, who can forget Froome in last years TdF running during a stage in lieu of not having a rideable bike.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEx2T6YDb58

  18. #68
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,978
    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Thing about beveling pads is..it cuts down marginally on surface area contact between pad and rotor. Weight is a clear factor in brake design which includes pad surface area and piston size and of course rotor size.

    That said, I believe disc brake design...like the evolution of rim brakes that has made them so far superior to rim brakes of even 10 years ago...this evolution will continue to make wheel changes more seamless.
    people keep saying disc brake design will evolve to make things easier to use. Well guess what, disc brake has been in mtb for what, 2 decades now? and most of the evolution has already taken place. There isn't much to evolve on the road. Caliper realignment, bleeding, noise, all things that happened 2 decades ago and still happen today albeit to a little lesser extent. No thanks, I'll stick with rim brakes. I still remember the dark days of disc when flipping a bike over and pressing the brake levers could get air into the system, what a PITA to have to be mindful of.

  19. #69
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,749
    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    people keep saying disc brake design will evolve to make things easier to use. Well guess what, disc brake has been in mtb for what, 2 decades now? and most of the evolution has already taken place. There isn't much to evolve on the road. Caliper realignment, bleeding, noise, all things that happened 2 decades ago and still happen today albeit to a little lesser extent. No thanks, I'll stick with rim brakes. I still remember the dark days of disc when flipping a bike over and pressing the brake levers could get air into the system, what a PITA to have to be mindful of.
    Never say never. Don't think many would have predicted carbon fiber bicycles either....
    But agree that I will stick with rim brakes as well...largely because I don't want the hassle. I would only accept the maintenance downside if I needed more braking performance.

  20. #70
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,978
    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Never say never. Don't think many would have predicted carbon fiber bicycles either....
    But agree that I will stick with rim brakes as well...largely because I don't want the hassle. I would only accept the maintenance downside if I needed more braking performance.
    Within 2 decades of carbon fiber use in bicycles, the evolution is more dramatic than the 2 decades of hydro disc. Evolution in disc is now leveled. Hopefully they improve the piston seals, because those seals sure as hell won't last more than 5 years before they start to rot and air gets in (this is in fair weather, in foul weather, they may not last 3 years). Anyway, I expect that RBR will soon have our own "Brake Time" subforum just like on MTBR! It's coming

  21. #71
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,749
    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    Within 2 decades of carbon fiber use in bicycles, the evolution is more dramatic than the 2 decades of hydro disc. Evolution in disc is now leveled. Hopefully they improve the piston seals, because those seals sure as hell won't last more than 5 years before they start to rot and air gets in (this is in fair weather, in foul weather, they may not last 3 years). Anyway, I expect that RBR will soon have our own "Brake Time" subforum just like on MTBR! It's coming
    Lol...technology has now leveled on hydro disc brakes? Glad you aren't chief engineer anywhere. You wouldn't have your job very long. Technology never levels.
    I mentioned rim brakes earlier. How long have rim brakes been around? 50 years?...longer? In the last 10 years, caliper brakes are 'night and day' better than their predessors.
    One can never predict the trajectory of any technology. Technology generally isn't linear. A modern bicycle with carbon frame and wheelset, electric shifting, 11 speeds in back...hydro disc brakes, press fit BB, carbon molded handlebar and stem...is a veritable space ship compared to bikes of the 60's.
    Virtually every component has evolved significantly and bicycles of the future will likely continue to have more integrated electronics...power meters...supplemental power....computers far superior to what we have today etc.

  22. #72
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,053
    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    Within 2 decades of carbon fiber use in bicycles, the evolution is more dramatic than the 2 decades of hydro disc. Evolution in disc is now leveled. Hopefully they improve the piston seals, because those seals sure as hell won't last more than 5 years before they start to rot and air gets in (this is in fair weather, in foul weather, they may not last 3 years). Anyway, I expect that RBR will soon have our own "Brake Time" subforum just like on MTBR! It's coming
    Necessity is the mother of invention. I actually agree with 11spd that it's going to get better with disc brake systems, largely because there is gaining interest in making it work better. MTB riders haven't needed to address issues of quick wheel changes, so the ideas were not developed.

    Road bike design hasn't always been great at pushing the boundaries of innovation. Heck, road bikes barely changed from the 50's to the late 80's, and then things changed quite a bit. But that innovation largely spilled over from development of mountain bikes, i.e. seeking to shed weight and add strength. This gave rise to things like new frame materials, different frame construction, better crank and BB designs, and a host of different drivetrain/shift solutions.

  23. #73
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,978
    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Lol...technology has now leveled on hydro disc brakes? Glad you aren't chief engineer anywhere. You wouldn't have your job very long. Technology never levels.
    I mentioned rim brakes earlier. How long have rim brakes been around? 50 years?...longer? In the last 10 years, caliper brakes are 'night and day' better than their predessors.
    One can never predict the trajectory of any technology. Technology generally isn't linear. A modern bicycle with carbon frame and wheelset, electric shifting, 11 speeds in back...hydro disc brakes, press fit BB, carbon molded handlebar and stem...is a veritable space ship compared to bikes of the 60's.
    Virtually every component has evolved significantly and bicycles of the future will likely continue to have more integrated electronics...power meters...supplemental power....computers far superior to what we have today etc.
    Whatchu talking about homie, about this "day and night" difference in rim brakes in last 10 years. Dura Ace 7900 was introduced about 10 years ago, yep, a decade ago. DA 7900 braking today is still on par with DA 9000 and DA 9100 for almost all use that I can think of. But that is not all, DA 7900 brakes are still competitive with with hydro disc in dry condition and aluminum rims. I'm failing to see your "day and night" comparison!

  24. #74
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,178
    Quote Originally Posted by MMsRepBike View Post
    Aqua blue sport is forcing their riders to use nothing but disc brakes. They're not giving any option. Even outspoken critics like champion Larry Warbasse is being forced to use them.

    Trek factory racing is forcing their riders to use them (at least on the Emonda), even in the mountains. They have posted that it's not going to be an option, every rider that was on rim brakes last year will be on disc brakes this year, zero exceptions.

    I'm sure they're not the only two teams doing this.
    Nice to see the manufacturers finally admit that there are no intrinsic benefits to disc, so they must *force* their riders to use them so they can sell more bikes and shops can sell more service.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  25. #75
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    3,424
    you sort of violated your own proposed policy.

Page 3 of 11 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The Once and For All, End All Be All, Disc Brakes vs. Rim Brakes Thread
    By Rashadabd in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 798
    Last Post: 4 Weeks Ago, 12:08 AM
  2. RBR TdF 2018 Predictions! Post by Start Time 2018
    By PJay in forum Pro Cycling - Tour de France
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: 07-28-2018, 07:45 AM
  3. 2018 SW Tarmac Disc Availability
    By boogermin in forum Specialized
    Replies: 209
    Last Post: 04-03-2018, 02:39 AM
  4. 2018 S-Works Venge Vias Disc Di2
    By WRM4865 in forum Specialized
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 10-26-2017, 05:48 PM
  5. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-29-2010, 11:44 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.