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  1. #51
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    Ha ha ha, that's awesome. More money than sense.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinrjensen View Post
    Did you ever ask him why he would do this? I mean, really it defies normal reason. There has to be a reason more than just wanting to waste a couple thousand bucks. Does he realize what this bike says about him? and it definitely says something about him, make no mistake about that. weather you like it or not this guy wants to stand out from the crowd in an extremely eccentric way. that's about the nicest way I can put it. he's pushing the envelope on normalcy here.
    EDIT: On further reflection I was a little harsh, but still the question needs to be asked. Why do this if not to incite violent reaction. This could "no way" have resulted in a better riding bike than one designed for this purpose, plus it would have cost what, 4 times as much as a bike designed for easy bike trails, which I would have to say this one would be suited for,; that and grocery shopping. I will stick by my statement that the person wanted to make a statement and that is what this bike is about. I will back of on just what statement he is trying to make but I will say he definitely wanted to be noticed. I mean he had to go way out of his way to do this. definitely outside of the box thinking going on here.
    yeah how silly paying 4 times what is really needed for a decent bike for the purpose.
    Did you notice the trek domane thread?
    Blows your hair back.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinrjensen View Post
    Did you ever ask him why he would do this? I mean, really it defies normal reason. There has to be a reason more than just wanting to waste a couple thousand bucks. Does he realize what this bike says about him? and it definitely says something about him, make no mistake about that. weather you like it or not this guy wants to stand out from the crowd in an extremely eccentric way. that's about the nicest way I can put it. he's pushing the envelope on normalcy here.
    EDIT: On further reflection I was a little harsh, but still the question needs to be asked. Why do this if not to incite violent reaction. This could "no way" have resulted in a better riding bike than one designed for this purpose, plus it would have cost what, 4 times as much as a bike designed for easy bike trails, which I would have to say this one would be suited for,; that and grocery shopping. I will stick by my statement that the person wanted to make a statement and that is what this bike is about. I will back of on just what statement he is trying to make but I will say he definitely wanted to be noticed. I mean he had to go way out of his way to do this. definitely outside of the box thinking going on here.
    IF someone wanted to go for a nice flat-bar city bike yet still get something a lot nicer than say a $500 off the shelf hybrid, they could get a titanium touring bike frame with integrated rack mounts, a nice panniers set, bulletproof custom-laced wheel set with dynamo hubs to power lights for city use, etc.

    IMO something like that, while not my style (I still prefer drop bars) would be money well spent for its purpose.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by robdamanii View Post
    Almost as bad as putting an upturned Brooks, a giant dangling saddle bag and a giant bar full of commuter sh!t on a Pinarello.
    Lol

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinrjensen View Post
    Did you ever ask him why he would do this? I mean, really it defies normal reason. There has to be a reason more than just wanting to waste a couple thousand bucks. Does he realize what this bike says about him? and it definitely says something about him, make no mistake about that. weather you like it or not this guy wants to stand out from the crowd in an extremely eccentric way. that's about the nicest way I can put it. he's pushing the envelope on normalcy here.
    EDIT: On further reflection I was a little harsh, but still the question needs to be asked. Why do this if not to incite violent reaction. This could "no way" have resulted in a better riding bike than one designed for this purpose, plus it would have cost what, 4 times as much as a bike designed for easy bike trails, which I would have to say this one would be suited for,; that and grocery shopping. I will stick by my statement that the person wanted to make a statement and that is what this bike is about. I will back of on just what statement he is trying to make but I will say he definitely wanted to be noticed. I mean he had to go way out of his way to do this. definitely outside of the box thinking going on here.
    Bart likes what he likes. He has always had "racing" bikes. As he has gotten older and had knees replaced, back giving out, and such, he has moved from drop bars to flat/riser bars. He knows what a good bike feels like and isn't ready to give that up. Hence a Trek and a Cervelo with high-end wheels, flat bar, XTR shifters, etc. He doesn't commute on the bikes much. He rides the Indiana bike 20 miles to a restaurant for breakfast and then back.

    As for the money...well, that isn't a problem, is it? If you look closely at the small picture of his bike, you can see a note taped to the handlebar. That's for his "personal assistant". It tells the assistant to drop off the bike at the shop and what he wants done to it. If you look at the big picture of his Arizona Trek you'll notice numbers on his tires. He marks the mileage every time he replaces tires, which he does right around every 1500 miles. He doesn't like flats.

    What I think the bike says about him is that he knows what he likes and doesn't give a flying f@#$ what anyone else thinks. It's one of the reasons I like him.
    Other countries need to stop hatin' or we'll unfriend them. - Christine

    Apparently I left my reading comprehension glasses in my ass. - DrRoebuck

    Still, it felt great and I felt like I was sitting on some kind of vibrator -Touch0Gray

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Hamilton View Post
    There you go. It struck me there must be thousands of teenagers who'd drool over that bike in its original configuration and would have appreciated how special it was. But for them, it's completely out of reach. It's sad when you see something really nice, really special getting wasted in the hands of someone who couldn't appreciate it when there are so many others who might have.
    So....you don't think people in a wheelchair should be able to buy nice shoes either?

    Is it really wasted if the guy actually rode it?
    And please... It's a Scott CR1. I sell Scotts, but I'd hardly consider them fine art or "special". It's a made in China carbon frame. Whoop.
    Other countries need to stop hatin' or we'll unfriend them. - Christine

    Apparently I left my reading comprehension glasses in my ass. - DrRoebuck

    Still, it felt great and I felt like I was sitting on some kind of vibrator -Touch0Gray

  7. #57
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    I "get" Bart. He didn't ruin the bike - he simply installed flat bars. That bike (and likely his cervelo) can be "restored" back to what it was designed to be.

    The Criagslist guy, not so much. The wheels are trashed and for no good reason. The kickstand on the thin carbon stay? While it may not have done damage, but really? And then there's all the missing pieces. A bar and stem, and two dura-ace brake/shifters? - even at ebay prices you are looking at at least $500 to replace, plus another $300-500 for a wheel set. After spending $1200-1300 on a 7 year old bike..

    The guy basically bought a porsche carrera 4, then went and had it jacked up so accommodate 33" super-swampers. What he really needed was a jeep. It just makes no sense (and his ad copy reinforces it).

    Now if he’d just written – “I wanted a lightweight, quick handling commuter bike and I didn’t care about the cost” – well then I would respect that. But he didn’t. He’s quite proud of how he ‘fixed’ all the things wrong with the race bike to make it his ‘tool around the neighborhood’ bike. And that’s sad.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    So....you don't think people in a wheelchair should be able to buy nice shoes either?
    Good question since the circumstances are so completely identical that no one could tell them apart.

    Not.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    Bart likes what he likes. He has always had "racing" bikes. As he has gotten older and had knees replaced, back giving out, and such, he has moved from drop bars to flat/riser bars. He knows what a good bike feels like and isn't ready to give that up. Hence a Trek and a Cervelo with high-end wheels, flat bar, XTR shifters, etc. He doesn't commute on the bikes much. He rides the Indiana bike 20 miles to a restaurant for breakfast and then back.

    As for the money...well, that isn't a problem, is it? If you look closely at the small picture of his bike, you can see a note taped to the handlebar. That's for his "personal assistant". It tells the assistant to drop off the bike at the shop and what he wants done to it. If you look at the big picture of his Arizona Trek you'll notice numbers on his tires. He marks the mileage every time he replaces tires, which he does right around every 1500 miles. He doesn't like flats.

    What I think the bike says about him is that he knows what he likes and doesn't give a flying f@#$ what anyone else thinks. It's one of the reasons I like him.
    Sounds like good people. I'd have coffee with the guy.

    When I look at these bikes I have some of the same thoughts everyone else has.... but would I make a thread about it? Nope.
    If the money didn't come out of my pocket what the hell do I care what anyone else does with their bike. Bunch of judgmental children in here so far.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Hamilton View Post
    Good question since the circumstances are so completely identical that no one could tell them apart.

    Not.
    If the circumstances were "completely identical" (as opposed to slightly identical??), it wouldn't be a comparison, would it?
    Other countries need to stop hatin' or we'll unfriend them. - Christine

    Apparently I left my reading comprehension glasses in my ass. - DrRoebuck

    Still, it felt great and I felt like I was sitting on some kind of vibrator -Touch0Gray

  11. #61
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    The only two issues that would concern me over that Scott CR-1 are, clamping force on the rear kick stand compromising the carbon fibre and the improper seat rail compatibility with a high end seat post.

  12. #62
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    I agree with others. I can't figure out why someone like this Bart guy would not go to a custom steel builder like Hampsten, and get a custom Titanium bike that fit his flatbar requirements. Heck, he could even have went to Crumpton and gotten a custom carbon bike that fit better. Instead, he wastes a ton of money on a stock frame and then tries to make it work for a situation it was not designed for. Weird.

    Also, he would be far better served with a different choice of wheels. Those 808's do very little other than look "cool" on that bike.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    If the circumstances were "completely identical" (as opposed to slightly identical??), it wouldn't be a comparison, would it?
    But in your hypothetical, there's basically nothing similar, much less identical. It's just a dumb non sequitur.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill2 View Post
    Lol
    robdamanii doesn't understand camera angles. You can tell that from the Craigslist-style pictures of his own bikes.

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Hamilton View Post
    robdamanii doesn't understand camera angles. You can tell that from the Craigslist-style pictures of his own bikes.
    You mean the bikes that don't have a giant light and botard bell on the front? Or the "I can stuff a midget into this bag" saddle bag?

    And I thought you were ignoring me?

    I'm so flattered.
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  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Hamilton View Post
    Love this part of the ad:



    Yup, I'll bet all those professional racers had racing bikes that looked just like this one.
    And I bet they all ride 13.9 cm frames, too.

    He did write that the frame was 139 mm, didn't he? I'm not imagining that, am I?

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by laxpatrick View Post
    I LOVE that he had the rims drilled out for Schraeder valve stems - cause screwing a couple of adapters on would've totally ruined the look... Or maybe he was afraid of having them stolen.
    He probably kept snapping the valve cores when he went to inflate his tires.

    Quote Originally Posted by nightfend View Post
    They clamped a heavy steel kickstand to a thin carbon chainstay. You think the drilled rims are their biggest engineering liability?
    I smell a do-it-yourself project here--regardless of his claims that the shop did it.
    Last edited by mpre53; 04-10-2012 at 08:45 AM.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole Hamilton View Post
    But in your hypothetical, there's basically nothing similar, much less identical. It's just a dumb non sequitur.
    Scott CR1 as a hybrid/commuter bike - bad because the guy isn't utilizing the bike to its full potential.

    Nice shoes - bad because the guy isn't utilizing the shoes to their full potential.

    I'm not seeing the problem here.

    The CR1 guy likely can't ride the CR1 as a comfort-race bike, and the guy in the wheelchair obviously can't use the shoes for what they were intended.
    Other countries need to stop hatin' or we'll unfriend them. - Christine

    Apparently I left my reading comprehension glasses in my ass. - DrRoebuck

    Still, it felt great and I felt like I was sitting on some kind of vibrator -Touch0Gray

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    Nice shoes - bad because the guy isn't utilizing the shoes to their full potential.
    Doesn't mean he can't appreciate them. I don't "utilize" any art I've ever bought, but I do appreciate it.

  20. #70
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    The bike isn't ruined. The bike is just different than it was.

    Why would someone do this?

    How about this- He bought the bike years ago (2006). He never really rode it. rather than buy a whole new bike he thought, Hmmm... 600 for new or 250 to alter this one? why not? it's a nice bike, maybe this will make it ride better.

    A lot of his mods speak to the inherent flaws in modern bike design- that super cush saddle is there because that bike can't fit tires wider than 25s. The bars are higher because frankly, that's more comfortable. And kickstands just make sense on a commuter bike- if you haven't used a kickstand lately, try it. you'll be amazed.

    a $10,000 superbike that just hangs on a peg in your living room and looks pretty, that you ride maybe 100 miles a year is not a good bike. It's not even good art.

    a bike you ride is a good bike. a bike is a tool, nothing more. and altering that tool to make it do what you want isn't ruining it, it's making it better.
    Quote Originally Posted by JustTooBig View Post
    Your Logical-to-Dumbass ratio is way out of kilter, buddy

  21. #71
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    My problem with kickstands is a more practical one than aesthetics. I've yet to see one that'll keep any bike from blowing over in even a moderate wind.

  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightfend View Post
    I agree with others. I can't figure out why someone like this Bart guy would not go to a custom steel builder like Hampsten, and get a custom Titanium bike that fit his flatbar requirements. Heck, he could even have went to Crumpton and gotten a custom carbon bike that fit better. Instead, he wastes a ton of money on a stock frame and then tries to make it work for a situation it was not designed for. Weird.

    Also, he would be far better served with a different choice of wheels. Those 808's do very little other than look "cool" on that bike.
    The bigger question is, why the f**k does it matter to you? Is there a shortage of overpriced wheels with dubious benefits? Is there a shortage of Madones?

    Makes me wish I'd kept my old colnago and added a basket just to piss people off.
    Quote Originally Posted by JustTooBig View Post
    Your Logical-to-Dumbass ratio is way out of kilter, buddy

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lotophage View Post
    How about this- He bought the bike years ago (2006). He never really rode it. rather than buy a whole new bike he thought, Hmmm... 600 for new or 250 to alter this one? why not? it's a nice bike, maybe this will make it ride better.
    Or how about this- He won the bike in a raffle. Had it given to him. Got it on clearance at a super deal. etc etc.

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Or how about this- He won the bike in a raffle. Had it given to him. Got it on clearance at a super deal. etc etc.
    Yup, either way, as long as he was riding it, who cares?
    Quote Originally Posted by JustTooBig View Post
    Your Logical-to-Dumbass ratio is way out of kilter, buddy

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpre53 View Post
    My problem with kickstands is a more practical one than aesthetics. I've yet to see one that'll keep any bike from blowing over in even a moderate wind.
    Yup. This is why kickstands disappeared about 40 years ago. In the 50s and 60s, pretty nearly all bikes had kickstands, even the "3-speeds" like the Austrian-made J.C. Higgins I had back then. But here's what Eugene Sloane wrote in his 1974 bicycling bible of the day, The NEW Complete Book of Bicycling, written just as they were disappearing. I studied this book like it was an engineering text that year when I bought my Paramount and can remember reading this. You'll like the last sentence.

    You'll never find a kickstand on a good bicycle for at least four reasons. First, if the kickstand is bolted on chainstays, it will eventually loosen and when you tighten it, you squeeze and weaken the stays. Second, if it's welded on, stays are weakened at the weld due to the heat stress. Third, kickstands, even aluminum ones, add weight. Fourth, a good breeze, or a passerby, can knock over a bike propped up by a kickstand, with possible damage to derailleur, finish, brake levers, or handlebars; it's much better to lean the bike against a wall. ... So please wipe that look of dismay off your face because good bikes are "missing" a kickstand; it's a negative feature.
    Just noticing that this passage was clearly written pre-Loctite. Still, it's been good advice for decades.
    Last edited by Nicole Hamilton; 04-10-2012 at 12:59 PM.

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