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  1. #1
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    Iíve always felt that the carbon steerer

    Would be the area of failure out of all the possible ways to have a front end catastrophe.

    I was worried about the wrong scenario, it appears.

  2. #2
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    fatties need to worry about carbon failure, yes

  3. #3
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    Use a torque wrench or better yet, only have your LBS touch your headset if you are that worried about it.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    ďStatistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.Ē -- Aaron Levenstein



  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    Would be the area of failure out of all the possible ways to have a front end catastrophe.

    I was worried about the wrong scenario, it appears.
    Your remark is a bit too elliptical to be intelligible. Are you suggesting that you have learned that you should have been focusing on a different component? If so, what is it? And how did you learn this (i.e., where did this news "appear")?
    Have you ever been to Electric Ladyland?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCavilia View Post
    Your remark is a bit too elliptical to be intelligible. Are you suggesting that you have learned that you should have been focusing on a different component? If so, what is it? And how did you learn this (i.e., where did this news "appear")?
    I didnít think, until recently that the fork legs were the weak link.

  6. #6
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    Forks generally are overbuilt even the lightweight ones. The big difference between current carbon forks and those made in the early nineties is that layup and resin impregnation FEA work led to the current state of the art forks we use now


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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    I didnít think, until recently that the fork legs were the weak link.
    Ah. I don't know if they're THE weak link, but there have been many stories, for many years, of fork legs breaking. Also, fork ends, handlebars, stems, etc. Anything can break, under the right circumstances.

    Did this revelation arise from a personal experience, or something you saw or read? (if the former, I hope you weren't hurt).
    Have you ever been to Electric Ladyland?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    Would be the area of failure out of all the possible ways to have a front end catastrophe.

    I was worried about the wrong scenario, it appears.
    What alternative scenario are you worried about ?.

    I'm under the impression that the move to carbon steerer tubes resulted in the move to a 1-1/2" bottom replacing the 1-1/8" that was common in aluminum steerers.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    I didnít think, until recently that the fork legs were the weak link.
    And where did you come to this conclusion? Me thinks you have spent way too much time obsessing over this thread:

    Roubaix-Elite Specialized Frame defect
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    ďStatistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.Ē -- Aaron Levenstein



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    I'm under the impression that the move to carbon steerer tubes resulted in the move to a 1-1/2" bottom replacing the 1-1/8" that was common in aluminum steerers.
    that change probably helps a lot for integrity.

    but, correct me if I'm wrong, I think mountain bikes went to that tapered standard earlier than road bikes and they all have aluminum or steel steerers.
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  11. #11
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    Back in 07' or 08' I aquired a used Fiordifrutta cyclocross team bike that had been well used... about a year into my ownership on a CX course pre-ride (thankfully) I hit a G-out section and the Easton carbon steer sheered off!!!

    faceplant into the front tire and full yard-sale knocking the breath out of me as I body slammed to the ground.

    lesson learned is that I'm 100% confident in carbon fiber components that I've purchased NEW and know the history of not so sure buying last seasons pro-team's cast offs as I felt the steerer was damaged before I purchased it all it needed was the perfect storm to finally break.

    I shudder to think what the outcome woulda been if I had hit that same section at race speeds.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    that change probably helps a lot for integrity.

    but, correct me if I'm wrong, I think mountain bikes went to that tapered standard earlier than road bikes and they all have aluminum or steel steerers.
    That could be true, I don't pay attention to mt. bikes, one of mine is a 1" Aheadset RockShock, the other's a 1-1/8 Fox, non tapered, both aluminum.

    I did notice the move on road bikes to 1-1/2" on the lower race area not long after carbon steerers became the norm.

  13. #13
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    the front of a bike gets a lot more impacts than the rear doesn't it? Chances are that stress induced failures would happen there. It's always been that way even before carbon was around.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwisimon View Post
    the front of a bike gets a lot more impacts than the rear doesn't it? Chances are that stress induced failures would happen there. It's always been that way even before carbon was around.
    There is one thing, though. Steel front ends would brinnell the lower headset race first before starting to wiggle apart along the tubes. The weakest points were in the welded joints.

    But look at these carbon frames! The joints are fine! They went bye bye right in the middle of the tubes, like toys. I don't want my life to depend on anything that fragile while streaking along the MUTs at 18 mph! One hit destroys a $2000 investment and I won't make it home. I don't want to take the gamble. Neither do lots of prospective buyers, hence gravel bikes. And now we're back to weights in the low 20#s that carbon bikes replaced. Who woulda known?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    I didnít think, until recently that the fork legs were the weak link.
    Not to be too insulting, but this is a reprise of your trolling behavior. If you have something specific to say, then say it. This kind of oblique and unsubstantiated insinuation does not bring anything to the party.

    As an aside, I have a Time CF fork with well over 190K road miles on it. What is your takeaway on that anecdote?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Not to be too insulting, but this is a reprise of your trolling behavior. If you have something specific to say, then say it. This kind of oblique and unsubstantiated insinuation does not bring anything to the party.

    As an aside, I have a Time CF fork with well over 190K road miles on it. What is your takeaway on that anecdote?
    until I had seen some of the newest posting on broken fork legs I lived under the assumption that the weakest link in a carbon fork was at the point just above the crown.

    As for youíre high mileage fork, who cares? My grandma smoked everyday and lived to 110 y/o.

    Have a nice day!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    until I had seen some of the newest posting on broken fork legs I lived under the assumption that the weakest link in a carbon fork was at the point just above the crown.
    So one (1) person comes here and posts pics of their broken fork legs. You then immediately come to the conclusion that this is the most common place for a carbon fork to break?

    Am I missing something here?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Not to be too insulting, but this is a reprise of your trolling behavior.
    This.
    Last edited by Lombard; 02-14-2018 at 09:39 AM.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    ďStatistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.Ē -- Aaron Levenstein



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    As for youíre high mileage fork, who cares? My grandma smoked everyday and lived to 110 y/o.

    Have a nice day!
    I care. Iíve got a full carbon EA90(CX) with about 15k mixed surface miles and 6 or 7 good racing wrecks. Tell me when Iím gonna endo?

    And pics, cigarette receipts and an obit or grandmas never smoked, and died at 63 of heart disease. (Pics or it didnít happen)


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    The internet is a little like a bar, a wonderful place where we can bullsh(t our past, but it also, is full of reasonably reliable sources of information to be used as ammo to call "bullish)t."

  19. #19
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    FWIW I've had two high-speed front-impact crashes on a bike with an all-carbon fork/steerer (EDGE 2.0) and in both cases the fork survived unscathed; it was the downtube of the steel frame that was destroyed in both instances.


    [edit: ...along with the front wheel. And, in one case, a lot of my bones.]

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
    FWIW I've had two high-speed front-impact crashes on a bike with an all-carbon fork/steerer (EDGE 2.0) and in both cases the fork survived unscathed; it was the downtube of the steel frame that was destroyed in both instances.


    [edit: ...along with the front wheel. And, in one case, a lot of my bones.]
    this is what i meant, stuff like this ^^^ I always thought the carbon steerer would snap like a twig but apparently it's stronger than i thought.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    this is what i meant, stuff like this ^^^ I always thought the carbon steerer would snap like a twig but apparently it's stronger than i thought.
    So why didn't you post this thought, along with whatever "evidence" you think might support it in your original post? Instead we get what amounts to a near refusal to explain what you were saying. Brilliant. Does it somehow surprise you that some people think you're a troll?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
    FWIW I've had two high-speed front-impact crashes on a bike with an all-carbon fork/steerer (EDGE 2.0) and in both cases the fork survived unscathed; it was the downtube of the steel frame that was destroyed in both instances.


    [edit: ...along with the front wheel. And, in one case, a lot of my bones.]
    Very possible to design a carbon fork to be stronger than the steel frame its mated to, especially the thinner walled tubing that satisfies the gods of light weight. And 11spd pointed out steel gives way sooner than carbon in an impact. So the truth isn't quite so simple.

    A few years ago, a few of the beefier carbon forks were bullet proof. They'd faithfully transfer all the impact force in a crash to the down tube and top tube, like happened in your case. It was the under built forks that broke.

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