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  1. #26
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by eriku16 View Post
    But not faster... and never will be.
    Haha.

  2. #27
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    Shift speeds up and down the cogs are governed by how fast the gear train it spinning. I never seen a shift executed while a bike was standing still.
    "On long training rides, never use energy greater than you would use walking. You should arrive home fresh, not beaten up."

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    The liability of creating the algorithm for the above in bold...I come from the world of engineering...is greater than being stuck with frame and component parts.

    Yes, the success of Specialized versus a smaller bike company allows them to spend countless R&D dollars to brainstorm 'what if' scenarios relative to bike design of the future. This has gotten us to present day and will take us to the next level.

    The bike can be designed to disassociate upon a crash that attenuates energy like a F1 car without an 'anticipatory' disassociation.

    But what you have touched upon has 'foreboding' liability implications. First, introducing 'any technology' that change the face of crash dynamics can be used against a manufacturer in a court of law if a rider gets hurt. This is how FMVSS safety standards became established which continue to evolve as technology improves. A standard is created and then automobiles are tested to this standard for compliance. The bicycle industry is a long way from that rigor and until then, introduction of any 'planned' disassociation of a bicycle pertaining to any crash scenario will not be implemented. Liability.

    Also, keep in mind the average bike rider wants their bike to stay together as much as possible in a low speed crash. This intent defies 'a threshold' of disassociation when a bike breaks up even though in a more severe crash a bike breaking into smaller pieces is conducive to greater crash protection.
    _________________________________________________


    As stated, this development was not for the average rider. Explored for the elite for whom even the most advanced cycles are disposable.

    Chris explained they were also partnering with a firm called "Cognex" (CGNX?) and Tifosi experimenting with forward sensors transmitting to a rider glasses.

    The cognex sensors are refined enough to detect minute changes in road surface composition.

    Thus, it can tell paint stripes, man holes, etc, from pavement with better traction.

    Moreover, the system factors in temperature, humidity, precipitation and dew point to guess when those potential slip hazards might be subject to condensation or moisture. Infrared temp sensors can tell if a metal manhole cover is cool enough to draw moisture given the ambient temp and humitidy.

    Currently, they have text and digital read out on the glasses. They are however, working on a screen/map type system that will "paint" a path through the hazards ahead for the rider.

    The challenge they have not been able to overcome is loose gravel. The system reads the irregular surface much like pavement and assumes there's traction there.

    They're exploring upper tolerance limits on the surface irregularities to distinguish loose from paved.

    Another avenue explored was sonic / sonar. Much like a bat picking out a mosquito in the dark, the thinking is a pair of sensors placed on each brighter might be able to pick up more of a 3D "picture" of the surface and tell loose from solid.
    Last edited by MaxKatt; 5 Days Ago at 08:49 AM.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaxKatt View Post
    _________________________________________________


    As stated, this development was not for the average rider. Explored for the elite for whom even the most advanced cycles are disposable.

    Chris explained they were also partnering with a firm called "Cognex" (CGNX?) and Tifosi experimenting with forward sensors transmitting to a rider glasses.

    The cognex sensors are refined enough to detect minute changes in road surface composition.

    Thus, it can tell paint stripes, man holes, etc, from pavement with better traction.

    Moreover, the system factors in temperature, humidity, precipitation and due point to guess when those potential slip hazards might be subject to condensation or moisture. Infrared temp sensors can tell if a metal manhole cover is cool enough to draw moisture given the ambient temp and humitidy.

    Currently, they have text and digital read out on the glasses. They are however, working on a screen/map type system that will "paint" a path through the hazards ahead for the rider.

    The challenge they have not been able to overcome is loose gravel. The system reads the irregular surface much like pavement and assumes there's traction there.

    They're exploring upper tolerance limits on the surface irregularities to distinguish loose from paved.

    Another avenue explored was sonic / sonar. Much like a bat picking out a mosquito in the dark, the thinking is a pair of sensors placed on each brighter might be able to pick up more of a 3D "picture" of the surface and tell loose from solid.
    Doesn't matter if for average or elite cyclist. You will not see anticipatory disassociation in our life time. I come from the world of R&D.

    The other stuff about telemetry in glasses is here in its infancy. Right now, its not cost effective but some may buy it and hop on the bandwagon...guys who spend $10K on a bike.

  5. #30
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    Do any of you little keyboard warriors own a bike?

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Doesn't matter if for average or elite cyclist. You will not see anticipatory disassociation in our life time. I come from the world of R&D.

    The other stuff about telemetry in glasses is here in its infancy. Right now, its not cost effective but some may buy it and hop on the bandwagon...guys who spend $10K on a bike.

    I hear ya. But nobody really will be "buying" that technology in the short term. Just team's testing and refining bleeding edge stuff. When it's fully baked, and they can produce it at semi-sane cost, it will become standard equipment for MAMIL's. Again, not on the immediate horizon.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by n2deep View Post
    Do any of you little keyboard warriors own a bike?

    ^^^^
    luddite

  8. #33
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by n2deep View Post
    Do any of you little keyboard warriors own a bike?
    Just got done riding 40 mi in the rain. Spent a lot of time waiting for others with rim brakes.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Just got done riding 40 mi in the rain. Spent a lot of time waiting for others with rim brakes.
    Did you have your inhaler with you? How’s Lance?

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by eriku16 View Post
    But not faster... and never will be.
    I'm a little ashamed that I just wondered if you can get a testable difference in the wind tunnel between actively shifting with a STI lever and a Di2 lever.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    Lightest mechanical rim brake bike I've seen is under 10 lbs (frame was a size S). It's gonna a while before disc will ever get this light, if ever.
    This is very relevant to my riding experience

  12. #37
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    Just convert it to fixie and get rid of all the brakes and electronic shifting in one swoop. PERFECT! Plus by definition it will become lighter.
    “Bicycling has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world.” - Susan B. Anthony 1896
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