Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 37
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,178

    As if I needed another reason to no buy a Specialized

    In a recent interview with Cyclist magazine (UK publication), Chris Yu, Specialized’s director of integrated technologies , says:
    “In our view, we likely won’t develop another performance road bike with rim brakes.” (or, in the near future, with mechanical shifting either as he makes clear later in the article).

    So, Specialized, good luck with that. I hope it marks the end of your market dominance.

    Also to all you “why do you care about disc brakes; you’ll always be able to buy what you want” types... what say you now?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,934
    Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.......
    Oh my, a troll who doesn't know the difference between your and you're. What will they think of next?

  3. #3
    Satanic Watch Winder
    Reputation: oily666's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    4,820
    I won't buy Specialized because of the way they treated a friend and my LBS. Trying to sue a coffee shop for it's name didn't set well either.
    The crumbling of our wide freeways suggest a narrower vision

    Only the mob and the elite can be attracted by the momentum of totalitarianism itself. The masses have to be won by propaganda.

    MAKE AMERICA SMART AGAIN

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: taodemon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    739
    They will likely lose some market share if they only focus on electronic shifting and disc brakes. Electronic shifting alone prices bikes out of a lot of peoples budget. Even of those who can afford it, not all are willing to pay the premium for the perceived improvement of electronic/disc. While it is possible that disc and electronic shifting prices might drop, the general trend in bike prices is to go up for the top models.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    5,021
    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    In a recent interview with Cyclist magazine (UK publication), Chris Yu, Specialized’s director of integrated technologies , says:
    “In our view, we likely won’t develop another performance road bike with rim brakes.” (or, in the near future, with mechanical shifting either as he makes clear later in the article).

    So, Specialized, good luck with that. I hope it marks the end of your market dominance.

    Also to all you “why do you care about disc brakes; you’ll always be able to buy what you want” types... what say you now?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
    Maybe they plan to abandon the lower end market, because high-end stuff is more profitable?? Just a guess

  6. #6
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    12,616
    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    Maybe they plan to abandon the lower end market, because high-end stuff is more profitable?? Just a guess
    “In our view, we likely won’t develop another performance road bike with rim brakes."

    There will still be plenty of lower end bikes. LOTS of money to be made there.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  7. #7
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,260
    Quote Originally Posted by oily666 View Post
    I won't buy Specialized because of the way they treated a friend and my LBS. Trying to sue a coffee shop for it's name didn't set well either.
    Because it's the name of a city AND ASI (Fuji) already owned the copyright on the Roubaix name for a bicycle.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Oxtox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    10,012
    would have never considered a Spec with or without elec shifting / disc brakes...
    Ancient Astronaut theorists say, 'YES!'

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,710
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    “In our view, we likely won’t develop another performance road bike with rim brakes."

    There will still be plenty of lower end bikes. LOTS of money to be made there.
    And Develop does not mean produce and sell.

    Who knows what the quote really means. But if taken literally it says nothing about what they plan to continue producing and selling.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: kiwisimon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    6,286
    Not sure how much more development of rim brakes could be done. Got any ideas? Discs and E bikes have tons of potential for innovation and development. maybe as Jay says it was more about Rand D and not sales.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3,487
    Quote Originally Posted by kiwisimon View Post
    Not sure how much more development of rim brakes could be done. Got any ideas? Discs and E bikes have tons of potential for innovation and development. maybe as Jay says it was more about Rand D and not sales.
    That's because rim brakes don't need more development. Ironically what's driving disc movement is people want carbon clinchers, don't want tubular or aluminum for what ever reason. Given CC inferior braking in wet and/or super steep long descents and the fact they have been standard on mountain bikes for years I think this was inevitable even though rim brakes are perfectly fine. it was the CC's that caused all this IMO...

  12. #12
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    12,616
    Just wait until they come out with electric brakes.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: BCSaltchucker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,896
    well I'm not gonna throw a nice new Venge disc out for eating crackers in bed
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: upstateSC-rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,587
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    “In our view, we likely won’t develop another performance road bike with rim brakes."

    There will still be plenty of lower end bikes. LOTS of money to be made there.
    Agreed.
    In reference to the Assault on Mt Mitchell...
    Quote Originally Posted by merckx56
    The easier solution is to find a biker bar in Spartanburg the night before, go in and pick a fight. The ass-whipping you'll get will be far less painful than the one Mitchell will give you the next day!

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: MaxKatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    443
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Just wait until they come out with electric brakes.

    I was at a conference in Stuttgart with Chris Yu recently. In terms of non-commercial, professional-only, performance road bikes, they were experimenting with "molecular disassociation."

    Contact with terra firma in a crash cannot be avoided. Almost.

    Moreover, interestingly, their research indicates much of the rider injury sustained stems from the tangled protrusions of the cycles themselves.

    They've theorized if the cycle itself was to break into increasingly smaller component pieces, the debris field would act as a sliding mobile, albeit imperfect, bit of shielding between the rider and the ground.

    To that end, the photo-type is equipped with sensors which attempt to detect loss of control, anticipate impact, and properly time the disassociation.

    Much like the programming of self-driving vehicles, the challenge is developing technology that can 1) correctly assess the environment and 2) make the critical disassociation decision in a timely fashion so as to maximize the mitigation of risk to rider.

    It was impressive and compelling. I felt they were really striving to earn that S-Works moniker. We'll see how it goes. I got the feeling it might be a while before this was "race ready." But still, news of the experimentation alone was exciting.

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    544
    I don't see the problem. If you're interested in a performance bike, you'll buy a bike that performs better. If you want something that doesn't perform as well, they'll have a rim brake bike to sell.

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 11spd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    1,746
    Quote Originally Posted by MaxKatt View Post
    I was at a conference in Stuttgart with Chris Yu recently. In terms of non-commercial, professional-only, performance road bikes, they were experimenting with "molecular disassociation."

    Contact with terra firma in a crash cannot be avoided. Almost.

    Moreover, interestingly, their research indicates much of the rider injury sustained stems from the tangled protrusions of the cycles themselves.

    They've theorized if the cycle itself was to break into increasingly smaller component pieces, the debris field would act as a sliding mobile, albeit imperfect, bit of shielding between the rider and the ground.

    To that end, the photo-type is equipped with sensors which attempt to detect loss of control, anticipate impact, and properly time the disassociation.

    Much like the programming of self-driving vehicles, the challenge is developing technology that can 1) correctly assess the environment and 2) make the critical disassociation decision in a timely fashion so as to maximize the mitigation of risk to rider.

    It was impressive and compelling. I felt they were really striving to earn that S-Works moniker. We'll see how it goes. I got the feeling it might be a while before this was "race ready." But still, news of the experimentation alone was exciting.
    The liability of creating the algorithm for the above in bold...I come from the world of engineering...is greater than being stuck with frame and component parts.

    Yes, the success of Specialized versus a smaller bike company allows them to spend countless R&D dollars to brainstorm 'what if' scenarios relative to bike design of the future. This has gotten us to present day and will take us to the next level.

    The bike can be designed to disassociate upon a crash that attenuates energy like a F1 car without an 'anticipatory' disassociation.

    But what you have touched upon has 'foreboding' liability implications. First, introducing 'any technology' that change the face of crash dynamics can be used against a manufacturer in a court of law if a rider gets hurt. This is how FMVSS safety standards became established which continue to evolve as technology improves. A standard is created and then automobiles are tested to this standard for compliance. The bicycle industry is a long way from that rigor and until then, introduction of any 'planned' disassociation of a bicycle pertaining to any crash scenario will not be implemented. Liability.

    Also, keep in mind the average bike rider wants their bike to stay together as much as possible in a low speed crash. This intent defies 'a threshold' of disassociation when a bike breaks up even though in a more severe crash a bike breaking into smaller pieces is conducive to greater crash protection.
    Last edited by 11spd; 08-10-2018 at 03:36 AM.

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    544
    You know, now that I think about it, I'd imagine the venn diagram of people who wouldn't ever buy a Specialized and people who wouldn't ever buy disc brakes approximates a single circle pretty well.

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,971
    In the near future, it will be funny when all the guys on the traditional high end rim brake bikes will be called out as "having an unfair weight and aero advantage" when they pass guys on high end bikes with electric shifting hydro disc. I can imagine the guys on rim brakes giving a little smirk

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Notvintage's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,203
    I wouldn't buy a Spech or any other high priced, but made in China for pennies on the dollar bike.

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    544
    Quote Originally Posted by Notvintage View Post
    I wouldn't buy a Spech or any other high priced, but made in China for pennies on the dollar bike.
    Cool story

  22. #22
    tlg
    tlg is online now
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    12,616
    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    In the near future, it will be funny when all the guys on the traditional high end rim brake bikes will be called out as "having an unfair weight and aero advantage" when they pass guys on high end bikes with electric shifting hydro disc. I can imagine the guys on rim brakes giving a little smirk
    Electric shifting is now lighter than mechanical. It's not out of the question that hydro may be lighter in the near future.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    745
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Electric shifting is now lighter than mechanical. It's not out of the question that hydro may be lighter in the near future.
    No, that's not possible.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    5,971
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Electric shifting is now lighter than mechanical. It's not out of the question that hydro may be lighter in the near future.
    Lightest mechanical rim brake bike I've seen is under 10 lbs (frame was a size S). It's gonna a while before disc will ever get this light, if ever.

  25. #25
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: eriku16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    117
    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Electric shifting is now lighter than mechanical..
    But not faster... and never will be.
    "On long training rides, never use energy greater than you would use walking. You should arrive home fresh, not beaten up."

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 17
    Last Post: 10-04-2016, 08:21 PM
  2. As if I needed another reason to hate road discs...
    By OldChipper in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 67
    Last Post: 09-04-2015, 08:25 AM
  3. Another reason to buy from a local bike shop, not online............
    By Lombard in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 07-09-2015, 02:32 PM
  4. Another reason to buy more bikes
    By ahaid in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 06-24-2009, 02:12 PM
  5. As if you needed another reason to buy a bike....
    By FrontRanger in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-05-2007, 09:01 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.