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  1. #1
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    innertubes with smooth valve stems ?????????

    Looking for some innertubes with smooth valve stems.
    Any recommendations????

    thanks.
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    Deda bars and stem
    Mavic Ksyrium Elite WTS 2013

  2. #2
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    Michelin

  3. #3
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    Zipp tubes have a nice smooth machined aluminum stem.

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    Re: innertubes with smooth valve stems ?????????

    Giant makes them.

  5. #5
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    Do all Michelin tubes have smooth stems?
    Litespeed Icon
    Ultegra SL
    Dura Ace Crank
    Mavic Ksyrium Elite 2013 WTS 2013
    Mavic CXP33 Ultegra
    Mavic Open Pro Dura Ace


    Bianchi Sempre
    Ultegra
    SLK Carbon Crank
    Deda bars and stem
    Mavic Ksyrium Elite WTS 2013

  6. #6
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    dumb question coming in 3...2...1...

    Why use smooth versus threaded? I'm new (again) so bear with me please

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by EggSalad View Post
    dumb question coming in 3...2...1...

    Why use smooth versus threaded? I'm new (again) so bear with me please

    Oh boy, never mind, found the answer, gotta love the search feature. Sorry to hijack, carry on gents.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by EggSalad View Post
    dumb question coming in 3...2...1...

    Why use smooth versus threaded? I'm new (again) so bear with me please
    Threaded valve stems tend to chew up the pump head gasket on your floor pump. I think unthreaded seat better too.

    I use michelins.

  9. #9
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    Vitorria latex and butyl tubes are smoothe
    Cyclists really need to learn a little Rule #5.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by charlox5 View Post
    I use michelins.
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^This
    Ride lots!
    Eddy Merckx

  11. #11
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    Specialized stems are threaded at the bottom for anyone who wishes to use the stem nut; smooth at the top.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by EggSalad View Post
    Oh boy, never mind, found the answer, gotta love the search feature. Sorry to hijack, carry on gents.
    I'll answer anyway: Threaded stems are for Freds.

  13. #13
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    Sunlite - tubes have smooth valve stems, removable valve cores, and they cost less then most other brands.

    Origin 8 - tubes have smooth valve stems, removable valve cores, light weight (85gr) and they cost less then most other brands.

    I have run both brands for years and never had any quality problems. I like having the removable valve core for adding sealant.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by EggSalad View Post
    Why use smooth versus threaded?
    A few years ago there was fad among poseurs to ride without the stem nuts. Cyclists would usually annoy them by pointing out that their stem nut is missing. That irritated the aforementioned poseurs greatly. And since the fad didn't go away for quite a while, it created a small market for smooth stems, which supposedly offered a legitimate defense against the aforementioned "where's the nut?" attacks. (It didn't really.) Was popular on hippie bikes mostly, but once in a while one could find a legit road bicycle with smooth stems.

    Anyhow, the fad is all but over now, but if one's determined one's can still find tubes with smooth stems available for sale in some lesser known stores and the like. Just a few months ago I saw them in a surplus store in San Jose. I thought about buying a few just as a relic of that era, but ended up getting a Russian gas mask instead....

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndreyT View Post
    A few years ago there was fad among poseurs to ride without the stem nuts. Cyclists would usually annoy them by pointing out that their stem nut is missing. That irritated the aforementioned poseurs greatly. And since the fad didn't go away for quite a while, it created a small market for smooth stems, which supposedly offered a legitimate defense against the aforementioned "where's the nut?" attacks. (It didn't really.) Was popular on hippie bikes mostly, but once in a while one could find a legit road bicycle with smooth stems.

    Anyhow, the fad is all but over now, but if one's determined one's can still find tubes with smooth stems available for sale in some lesser known stores and the like. Just a few months ago I saw them in a surplus store in San Jose. I thought about buying a few just as a relic of that era, but ended up getting a Russian gas mask instead....
    WTF??? Most people don't care if they are threaded because they use deep cross section rims with valve extenders. The threads are worthless in those cases.
    Cyclists really need to learn a little Rule #5.

  16. #16
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    Conti valves are smooth too.

    I hate the nuts, they keep coming loose and rattling. Nothing worse than having loose nuts (although having tight nuts can be an issue for some too ;) )

  17. #17
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    I use Kenda and stems are smooth.

  18. #18
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    I actually need the threaded stems as my lezyne floor pump actually screws on the stem (and that thing seriously kicks butt BTW). Before getting that thing (and seeing the light), I had a press on pump, smooth stems would have been pretty nice back then.

    On a side note...I may be a "newb" for doing it, but I take the stem nuts off on e I'm done inflating the tire on a fresh install. I had them some lose and rattle too many times, I just got sick of it. Like many have experienced, too tight = ripped tube, too lose = rattling on ride. I do keep one in my saddle bag though as you have to push my CO2 inflator on pretty hard and the nut helps hold everything in place.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by spookyload View Post
    The threads are worthless in those cases.
    The threads are worthless in all cases. Repeat after me: "Only Freds use stem nuts." They serve no useful purpose.

  20. #20
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    I use Michelin A1 threadless tubes. I must admit though, that sometimes the pump head pops off at high pressure without the threads. Probably just a worn rubber gasket.
    "What is this? A center for ants?"

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlandry View Post
    I use Michelin A1 threadless tubes. I must admit though, that sometimes the pump head pops off at high pressure without the threads. Probably just a worn rubber gasket.
    Yep, a worn out gasket from using tubes with threaded valve stems. ;)

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by giosblue View Post
    innertubes with smooth valve stems ?????????

    Looking for some innertubes with smooth valve stems.
    Any recommendations????

    thanks.

    My recommendation is to remove your "?" key and throw it away....
    Other countries need to stop hatin' or we'll unfriend them. - Christine

    Apparently I left my reading comprehension glasses in my ass. - DrRoebuck

    Still, it felt great and I felt like I was sitting on some kind of vibrator -Touch0Gray

  23. #23
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    (BTW, to continue the points made my previous message)

    ... The fad to ride without a nut (and to use a smooth stem) produced a couple of mythical justifications of "sounds right" kind, that supposedly explained why the nut removal is somehow the right thing to do

    The first one is a myth about the nut allegedly being capable of "rattling" when it gets loose. So far no one was able to successfully reproduce in it practice though, despite numerous attempts with different kinds of threaded stems and different kinds of rims. I personally ride metal rims with stem nuts. I don't closely monitor these nuts, so they get loose on regular basis. And they simply never rattle, regardless of whether they are tight or loose. The conclusion generally accepted by default in the cycling world is that "nut rattle" complainers just blamed some other issues of their drivedrain on stem nuts (and just ignored the fact that stem nut removal did not fix the rattle).

    The second one is a half-myth about threaded stems allegedly chewing up the rubber sealing ring in the pump head. It is only a half-myth because for obvious reasons the threads will indeed chew up the pump head if the user attempts to remove the head without disengaging the locking lever. On the other hand, proper disengagement of the locking lever before head removal prevents any additional wear from the threads. In other words, the problem here is not the threads, but rather the lack of proper skills when using the pump. Trying to fix that lack of skills by installing a smooth stem instead or learning to use the pump properly is obviously a very questionable proposition.

    I hope that clears some things up to people who are just getting into cycling.

    P.S. As a side note, one immediate question that pops up here is why people attempt to remove the pump had without disengaging it.

    You see, this stems from the lack of technical understanding of how a Presta pump works. Many non-technical people get trapped in the false belief that the Presta pump head depresses the valve head thus positively forcing the valve to stay permanently open. This naturally makes them to assume that if they are too slow with pump head removal, then a significant amount of air will escape from the freshly inflated tube (this belief is supported by the sound of hissing air that is always heard during the pump head removal). To prevent this from happening, they develop a parasitic habit of yanking the pump head from the stem in one quick and forceful motion. Most of them do remember to disengage the lever in the process, but their actions are typically poorly timed, resulting in pump head being damaged by the threads. (Curious children, naturally interested in observing the process of tire inflation, often end up with a black eye from their father's elbow as the father yanks the pump head off the stem.)

    Meanwhile, people who actually understand how the pump operates know perfectly well, that it doesn't really matter how fast or slow you detach the head from the stem. The air that hisses out during the detachment is actually residual pressure in the pump hose, not the pressure from the tire. No air from the tire escapes at all. So, the people who know how to do it properly just take their time to disengage the lever and maneuver the pump head off the stem without resorting to any "yanking". This deals absolutely no additional wear from the stem threads to the rubber sealer.
    Last edited by AndreyT; 05-31-2013 at 10:53 AM.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndreyT View Post
    (BTW, to continue the points made my previous message)

    ... The fad to ride without a nut (and to use a smooth stem) produced a couple of mythical justifications or "sounds right" kind, that supposedly explained why the nut removal is somehow the right thing to do

    The first one is a myth about the nut allegedly being capable of "rattling" when it gets loose. So far no one was able to successfully reproduce in it practice though, despite numerous attempts with different kinds of threaded stems and different kinds of rims. I personally ride metal rims with stem nuts. I don't closely monitor these nuts, so they get loose on regular basis. And they simply never rattle, regardless of whether they are tight or loose. The conclusion generally accepted by default in the cycling world is that "nut rattle" complainers just blamed some other issues of their drivedrain on stem nuts (and just ignored the fact that stem nut removal did not fix the rattle).

    The second one is a half-myth about threaded stems allegedly chewing up the rubber sealing ring in the pump head. It is only a half-myth because for obvious reasons the threads will indeed chew up the pump head if the user attempts to remove the head without disengaging the locking lever. On the other hand, proper disengagement of the locking lever before head removal prevents any additional wear from the threads. In other words, the problem here is not the threads, but rather the lack of proper skills when using the pump. Trying to fix that lack of skills by installing a smooth stem instead or learning to use the pump properly is obviously a very questionable proposition.

    I hope that clears some things up to people who are just getting into cycling.

    P.S. As a side note, one immediate question question that pops up here is why people attempt to remove the pump had without disengaging it.

    You see, this stems from the lack of technical understanding of how a Presta pump works. Many non-technical people get trapped in the false belief that the Presta pump head depresses the valve head thus positively forcing the valve to stay permanently open. This naturally makes them to assume that if they are too slow with pump head removal, then a significant amount of air will escape from the freshly inflated tube (this belief is supported by the sound of hissing air that is always heard during the pump head removal). To prevent this from happening, they develop a parasitic habit of yanking the pump head from the stem in one quick and forceful motion. Most of them do remember to disengage the lever in the process, but their actions are typically poorly timed, resulting in pump head being damaged by the threads. (Curious children, naturally interested in observing the process of tire inflation, often end up with a black eye from their father's elbow as the father yanks the pump head off the stem.)

    Meanwhile, people who actually understand how the pump operates know perfectly well, that it doesn't really matter how fast or slow you detach the head from the stem. The air that hisses out during the detachment is actually residual pressure in the pump hose, not the pressure from the tire. No air from the tire escapes at all. So, the people who know how to do it properly just take their time to disengage the lever and maneuver the pump head off the stem without resorting to any "yanking". This deals absolutely no additional wear from the stem threads to the rubber sealer.
    I can't tell if this is supposed to be humour or not...

    Presta valve threads do indeed chew up pump head inserts, and I can guarantee you that I'm not yanking the head off without first releasing the lever.

    I have ridden with people who had loose presta valve nuts, and they do indeed rattle. Mine would probably rattle too if I weren't anal about tightening them frequently (on the bikes that have threaded stems).
    Other countries need to stop hatin' or we'll unfriend them. - Christine

    Apparently I left my reading comprehension glasses in my ass. - DrRoebuck

    Still, it felt great and I felt like I was sitting on some kind of vibrator -Touch0Gray

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    I can't tell if this is supposed to be humour or not...

    Presta valve threads do indeed chew up pump head inserts, and I can guarantee you that I'm not yanking the head off without first releasing the lever.

    I have ridden with people who had loose presta valve nuts, and they do indeed rattle. Mine would probably rattle too if I weren't anal about tightening them frequently (on the bikes that have threaded stems).
    I agree. I hate threaded valves and will not buy tubes with them unless I have no other choice. Before I knew better, I used tubes with threaded valves and they screwed up the head on my pump. It was not due to failing to disengage the pump head, but due to the threads grabbing the rubber gasket inside the head. Fortunately I was able to get a replacement rubber gasket but it was a pain. I have used smooth valves ever since.

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