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  1. #1
    jkk
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    Lezyne Pressure Carbon Drive Capabilities

    Haven't seen this model reviewed here ... I bought one today, fits in jersey pocket, weighs nothing - package says 72g and good to 120 psi. Impressivley built and finished but expensive. When I tried it to inflate my 23C tire, after 150 strokes, the last 25 or so extremely difficult, I just couldn't get any more air in. After disconnecting the pump (only a small amount of air escaping while unscrewing the pump), I measured 75 psi. I was expecting better based on the company literature and packaging. I think it would be a superb pump for a mountain bike with pressures in the 30 to 40 psi range, but I bought it for my road bike which I normally run at 105 psi. I suppose in a jam, 75 psi would enable me to get home as opposed to being stranded, but I'm planning to return it and maybe go for Lezyne's 160 psi rated pumps. Although they are a bit longer, it will be a good trade-off. Has anyone tried Lezyne's160 psi rated "road drive" pumps? What psi do they realistically achieve?

  2. #2
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    Their mini-pump names are confusing. I believe what you got was the mountain pump, and what you got in pressure is about all you can expect. There's an identical pump in a thinner profile that takes almost twice the number of pumps but does get you to well over 100 psi -- at least I do it without a problem. It works at least as well as any mini pump does -- lots of pumping needed but it does get to the pressure. If you use a mini pump a lot, I'd suggest their model that has a longer hose and a mini foot brace so you can put more muscle into it. It's not as svelte but gives you more pressure faster.

    Don't forget Lezyne's little additions to their pumps, like their right-angle pump head for disc wheels and their pump hose with an integrated pressure gauge. Even if you simply toss them in your tire bag, they are very useful when you need them.

  3. #3
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    Basic tire pump physics is pretty simple. The larger the piston, the more are is pumped per stroke and the harder you have to push. The force and volume/stroke goes as the square of the piston diameter. Pumps for mountain bike tires have larger diameter pistons so you can push more air into the larger tires but sacrifice the ultimate pressure you can reach. Road pumps have smaller diameter pistons so you can reach higher pressure, but it moves less air per stroke which is a trade-off for the smaller volume of road tires.

    Lezyne road pumps generally have "road", "pressure", or "HP" in their names to signify they are optimized for the higher pressure and smaller volume of road tires.

  4. #4
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    I used a Road Drive for about a season. 200 strokes to get up to around 100psi. I stopped using it because the tubes I am currently using have removable valve cores and it would unscrew the valve cores when I was unscrewing the hose. I went back to a Blackburn A-1 plus packing a couple 16g co2's. As mentioned above mini pumps have a smaller diameter and take a lot of strokes.

    P.S. I contacted Leyzne and inquired if they had any plans about making a full length frame pump with the removable hose, they said no. Too bad, it would be awesome.
    Last edited by Dinosaur; 03-05-2011 at 07:02 AM. Reason: added info

  5. #5
    jkk
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    ... thanks

    Thanks for the feedback. It's good to know that at least some of these models do actually achieve 100 psi or more. Two salesmen at the local bike shop I bought this "Pressure Carbon Drive" at (the best in the area, services a well-known pro's bikes) told me this particular model I bought was indeed intended for road bike use. I'm going to return it and try out one rated for 160 psi.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkk
    Thanks for the feedback. It's good to know that at least some of these models do actually achieve 100 psi or more. Two salesmen at the local bike shop I bought this "Pressure Carbon Drive" at (the best in the area, services a well-known pro's bikes) told me this particular model I bought was indeed intended for road bike use. I'm going to return it and try out one rated for 160 psi.
    On the website this model is listed as the Pressure Carbon Drive 2. I wonder if there is a mark 2 model for a reason.

  7. #7
    downhill quickly
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dinosaur
    I used a Road Drive for about a season. 200 strokes to get up to around 100psi. I stopped using it because the tubes I am currently using have removable valve cores and it would unscrew the valve cores when I was unscrewing the hose. I went back to a Blackburn A-1 plus packing a couple 16g co2's. As mentioned above mini pumps have a smaller diameter and take a lot of strokes.

    P.S. I contacted Leyzne and inquired if they had any plans about making a full length frame pump with the removable hose, they said no. Too bad, it would be awesome.
    Good point with the removable valve core. For my road tubeless DA 7900 c24’s a consideration for a cleaner process of adding occasional sealant was to replace the existing Shimano valves with a Stans removable value core. However, as I like my dual purpose Road Drive CFH with high pressure CO2 hose and the act of keeping the “action” either pumping or CO2 away from the Presta valve; I will not be replacing with Stans removable cores and rather keep my Leyzne.

  8. #8
    I am the Walrus
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    What a timely thread, I just got my Lezyne Pressure Drive M today. Decided to go this route after nearly being stranded in freezing rain last week using CO2. I run 700x25 tires at around 100f and 110r.

    I just let the air out of one of my tires and hooked up the Lezyne. 200 strokes got me a little winded and 105 PSI. The Pressure Drive M (medium) is 107 grams and about 9 inches long, so could go in a jersey pocket, but looks fine mounted on the frame.

    Maybe I'm not smart enough to use CO2 or stay out of freezing rain, but I feel better having my new pump.





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    “Enjoy yourself, it's later than you think."

  9. #9
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    I've got the Carbon Road Drive M(edium) and after using it in the field 5 or 6 times I'd say it's a good pump.

    Never counted the pumps or actually measured the pressure, but by feel I'd say it's relatively pain free to get a 700-23 to 100 psi.

    The only annoyance is the screw-on valve. You have to screw it on twice, once to shape the tube so you can go through the tire mounting routine, then again to inflate to battle pressure.

    The Carbon Road Drive is super light and small, so on balance, for a portable pump, I'm happy with it.

  10. #10
    jkk
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    Thanks again everyone for the great feedback. I didn't mention this before, but the "Pressure Carbon Drive" that I bought and could not get beyond 75 psi is the short model, 170 mm long. Based on the feedback here, others have had success achieving 100 psi or more with the medium or longer sizes. I'll definitely be returning the Pressure Carbon Drive and getting one of the medium size road drive models - those seem to be the optimal configuration for these pumps.

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