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  1. #1
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    Little Rubber Tubes in Patch Kit?

    I bought a new patch kit from the LBS and it has 2 little gum rubber tubes in the package as well as the glue, buffer and patches. The instructions do not mention the rubber tubes.

    I asked the bike shop rats and they did not know.

    Are they just some extraneous pieces to float around the box? Are they treated to absorb moisture? I give up.

  2. #2
    wim
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    Brings back memories for me, LOL. These go on a so-called Woods valve. The valve stem of these things was a closed metal tube with a hole in its side. Sliding the rubber tubing over that valve stem closed the hole. At pumping, the air would expand the rubber tubing a bit and allow air into the tire. The little piece of rubber tubing would often rot and break, resulting in a sudden flat. Photo shows two valve stems.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the answer. I am very glad I do not need them. I can't imagine too many Woods Valves out there anymore.

  4. #4
    wim
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    Quote Originally Posted by biketyke
    I can't imagine too many Woods Valves out there anymore.
    Millions of them still out there in Northern and Central Europe on commuter-type bikes. In the 1970s, a modified version of the Woods valve appeared with the rubber tubing replaced by an internal check valve. That made pumping much easier and allowed for higher pressures. 40 psi or so was about the limit with the rubber-tubing valve.

  5. #5
    Domokun!
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    Quote Originally Posted by wim
    Brings back memories for me, LOL. These go on a so-called Woods valve. The valve stem of these things was a closed metal tube with a hole in its side. Sliding the rubber tubing over that valve stem closed the hole. At pumping, the air would expand the rubber tubing a bit and allow air into the tire. The little piece of rubber tubing would often rot and break, resulting in a sudden flat. Photo shows two valve stems.

    I learned something today! I thought I was old school too...
    " The ability to purchase an expensive bicycle does not make you a cyclist! "

  6. #6
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    Wow to Wim

    Quote Originally Posted by OldSkoolFatGuy
    I learned something today! I thought I was old school too...
    Likewise! Of course I never spent much time riding commuter bikes in Europe

  7. #7
    Frog Whisperer
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    hehehe...well there is Old School, and then there's wim!

    Thanks for the lesson I learned something today as well.... and lemme tell you, it's geting HARD to teach this old dog new tricks!
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right......

  8. #8
    Baltic Scum
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    Cool. I remember them from my first bike, a dark green Dutch offering which served me from 7th grade on. Of course, I did not know it has an English name. As the only design available at the time, we just called them die Ventile.
    Was juckt es die stolze Eiche, wenn sich ein Schwein an ihr kratzt?

  9. #9
    Unsafe at Any Speed
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    There was a 1970s version with a little external plastic ring in a groove replacing the rubber tube. The so-called 'easy valve'.

    These valves remind one of the days when everything on a bike could be bought separately, disassembled, cleaned, serviced, adjusted, ...

  10. #10
    wim
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    Little criminals, 1956.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pieter
    These valves remind one of the days when everything on a bike could be bought separately, disassembled, cleaned, serviced, adjusted, ...
    Your "disassembled" brought back something I shouldn't really admit to in a public forum, but here goes anyway: All you had to do to take out those valve stems was to remove a finger-tight, nicely knurled retainer nut. Capitalizing on this, a friend and I went from bicycle to bicycle (there were hundreds of them) parked at our school and removed the stems from bicycles whose owners we knew. We then attempted to sell the stems back to them and, if needed, rent them a pump. The scheme ran afoul of fate when we were observed by a teacher counting Woods valve stems instead of paying attention in class.

  11. #11
    Frog Whisperer
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    too funny................admitting this public is ok since you got caught then anyhow.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right......

  12. #12
    Unsafe at Any Speed
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    Well yes... Today, one will have to slash a tire or break off a valve to engage in similar criminal activity, a little drastic.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pieter
    Well yes... Today, one will have to slash a tire or break off a valve to engage in similar criminal activity, a little drastic.
    Hey, not necessarily. The Presta tubes on my bike have removable valve cores. Surprised the hell out of me one day when I thought I was opening the valve and the whole core flew out of the tube (luckily I found it).

    Asad

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