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  1. #1
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    Mace / Pepper Spray holster

    I few months back I seen a thread on here showing pics of a Mace / Pepper Spray holster someone posted, after being chased by a few dogs (always when I come to a hill) I'm ready to fight back......

    Hope you guys can help.

  2. #2
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    If you wanna fight back get yourself a holster and a 15 shot repeater air gun and that will put an end to the same dogs doing this over and and over.

    Fire a few warning shots and the next at the dog if they don't back down. NO dog owner has the right to keep a dog that will threaten you on a public road.

    I made a velcro strap and put the holster around the steer colume so I could draw on my right side which is where the dogs were coming at me.

    Mace is a complete waste of time, a good air gun packs enough punch that a couple of face shots will stop even the biggests dogs instantly. They won't mess with you again in the future.

  3. #3
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    Yes, a bb gun in the ass will do some aversion therapy with a dog without hurting it. Don't use too much power, it doesn't take much and I don't think you actually need to harm the dog for it to work. I've taught several dogs to quit doing things by shooting them in the ass with my bb gun. No permanent harm. I wouldn't shoot them in the face though - no reason for it, and why would you want to blind a dog when it serves no purpose?

    But pepper spray in the face will teach it too. I'd use the milder/smaller cannisters. I really doubt it takes a rocket engineer to figure out how to fashion an easy to use "holster" readily accessible from the handlebars. My first thought is thin cardboard and duct tape. Take it from there.

    Note, I'm not as much advocating PUNISHING the dog as TEACHING it to not chase bikes. Like using a shock collar to teach a bird dog not to sniff at snakes or porcupines.

  4. #4
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    My warning shots are exactly that a warning.

    The problem I have here on the rural roads in kansas is that there are many dogs that are left to do whatever they please. Farmers routinely shoot these dogs for chasing and attacking their livestock. These dogs aren't playing games, if they can they will attack you.

    Types of dogs that have been serious problems and ones that I've shot. Rottweilers, Dobermans, German Shepards, Chows(probably the meanist dogs on earth), pitbulls, hounddogs, and large muts.

    When you're going up a hill and two or three dogs in a pack are coming in on you and your 20 miles in the middle of nowhere with no one around, you give the dog a warning shot and then you do whatever is necessary.

    In Kansas if a dog chases your livestock you can shoot it, the owner of that dog is supposed to shoot it as well, the law enforcement is supposed to shoot to.

    Basically I consider myself a whole lot more important than a cow.

  5. #5
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    Can't you ride away from dogs when this happens, do you really need to carry a gun on your bike?

    I'm sure they are not greyhounds, they can't keep up with you on your bike with the adrenaline rushing for too long, can they?

  6. #6
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    Nashbar sells a plastic clip-on that fits on the handlebar than will carry a can of Halt. I tried using Halt on a number of occasions but found that because the wind always blows it away that I could never actually hit the dog with it. I also think it increases your chance of wrecking since now you've only got one hand on the bar and you've got your attention directed at the dog instead of the road up ahead. The only solution I've found is to either outrun the dog or pick another route.

  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=BikeRider] I also think it increases your chance of wrecking since now you've only got one hand on the bar and you've got your attention directed at the dog instead of the road up ahead.

    Thanks for the info, that's what I thought when guys said to use your water bottle, I guess I just need to learn to pedal faster........

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by iamnotfilip
    Can't you ride away from dogs when this happens, do you really need to carry a gun on your bike? ?
    You probably don't have a lot of experience. You know of course that a dog can easily run 20 mph don't you? You also know that under most circumstances even a fit recreational rider generally isn't cruising that speed, and it takes a while to accelerate to a speed faster than a dog. In the mean time, the dog's come out of the weeds, giving you very short warning before it's on you. Remember, the dog's at full run, you need to accelerate.

    Now imagine you're going up hill.

    After you've ridden for a while, I think you'll understand that it's not always possible to outrun a dog, plus why should you when you can pop the dog and teach it a valuable lesson? You might be helping the next rider who isn't as fit and fast as you are.

    Quote Originally Posted by iamnotfilip
    I'm sure they are not greyhounds, they can't keep up with you on your bike with the adrenaline rushing for too long, can they?
    You've never been chased by a dog, I guess.

  9. #9
    Captain Obvious
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    frame pump or water bottle. no extra attachments necessary.
    And it just hurts in the very best way possible without a high priced dominatrix.---Ronsonic

    I'm pretty confident that I've pissed off several dozen random strangers on the internet tonight.---Creakyknees

    disclaimer---I make sh!t up as I go along.

  10. #10
    All or Nothing Baby!!!
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    Every time i've had a dog come after me, they have been more curious and just run beside me for a while. When I was younger i had a dog bite at my ankle though. If that happens now, i'll kick it then call the cops. In South Carolina there are no dog laws, no fence laws and no leash laws except in parks. A dog is 'legally' free to run around on your property but if that thing tries to bite me, I'll take it out whatever way I can. I'm not going to try to hurt it, but if that's what it takes.

    It's funny though, usually if the dog isn't going to attack and runs beside you just barking, you can swerve at it and they run like 4 feet to the side. Kinda fun to mess with them, then they will try to box you in on the side of the road. Just start pushing them to the other side of the road and they get scared and stop running, haha. I know the best thing you can do is just ignore them if they aren't close to you because they lose interest and decide the effort isn't worth the fun. I carry Halt in my back pocket. I usually see the dogs coming from thier yard.
    Zoom This!

  11. #11
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    How about putting some of stuff that stops a dog from chewing on things on rolled up cloth. When the dog comes after you just drop in front of the dog. The dog may go after the cloth, if he does he will soon associate going after you with a bad taste. Try writing the dog whisperer guy.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by iamnotfilip
    Can't you ride away from dogs when this happens, do you really need to carry a gun on your bike?

    I'm sure they are not greyhounds, they can't keep up with you on your bike with the adrenaline rushing for too long, can they?
    Let me be a little more clear about my situation. This is Kansas, I live on the on the east side 5 miles from Missouri, we have a lot of rolling hills.

    I ride a highway with little shoulder, about 6 inches and a white line. Tractor trailors routinely buzz me at 70+ miles an hour.

    I don't normally strap my gun on unless I'm having problems on a regular basis. I never use the gun in city limits as city dogs are nothing to deal with.

    Now what I'm really dealing with are dogs that aren't cute little fluffy pets. These are dogs that are left to their own most of the time. They often form little packs. These dogs aren't stupid and will often wait for me up ahead while I'm climbing a hill then one will cut me off and the others will circle in from behind. You now have a dog in the front and back, up a hill with traffic. What do you do. Do you sit there like a bone head and reach for the mace, no thanks.

    Legally I can carry a firearm in Kansas, but the 15 shot repeater has proven to be very effective at stopping them in their tracks, if one did actually clamp down on me it wouldn't take much to get him to back off with a gas gun.

    If two big dogs get you down on the ground they can easily over take a very strong man, once they start tearing at your face you got problems.

    The two dog situation is something that I've run into many times. You don't know what fear is until you've had two large dogs with a blood currdling growls with their backs hunched up and teeth flashing circling in on you waiting to rip the crap out of you for nothing more than daring to ride your bike down the road.

    As far as out running them. I do on a regular basis. Big dogs with big bone structures are easy to outrun on the flats and often times up hills. Dogs like Dobermans, German Shepards, Chows, Pit Bulls are tougher to get away from going up hill.

    Two weeks ago I was cut off by two dogs one a large half breed and one a german shepard, they were chasing cows in the pasture and terrorizing. I spotted them and hoped to get by unnoticed, well they saw me and started in on me going up hill. I had no choice but to stop as pedaling was going to be slower than they could run and would provoke an attack from behind. The german shepard was trying to come in on me and got with in about a foot of my legs growling with teeth showing, back stood up, and seemed ready to attack. I didn't have my gun with me, if I had I could have fired some warning shots and that probably would have done it. In this case I just stood perfectly still and hoped to god they didn't decided to start in on me.


    I'm 35 and race, so lack of speed isn't the issue.

  13. #13
    Knives, Guns, and Booze
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    If you get one of these:



    you can use a standard firearm holster.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camilo
    I've taught several dogs to quit doing things by shooting them in the ass with my bb gun. No permanent harm. .
    WHAT????

    Certainly there may be harm done.

    I don't want anyone to think that this "technique" you speak about is safe or OK.
    You riding with a gun?

    Sorry to rant but this is upsetting, they are animals and the owners need to take responsiblity.
    No need to injure a dog with a BB gun.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leopold Porkstacker
    If you get one of these:



    you can use a standard firearm holster.
    Their smaller one is great, too. Won't blow away in the wind.

    http://www.cabelas.com/prod-1/0044111228579a.shtml

  16. #16
    Cat 6 rider
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    Use pepper spray (not Mace- Mace does not work on dogs). I'd strongly advise against using a BB gun unless you really want to hurt/kill the dog. I've only had one dog chase me. It was a domestic dog, not a farm dog, and so used to being disciplined. I shouted 'Bad!' and it hesitated and I rode away.
    To the troll mobile, away...

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by messyparrot
    WHAT????

    Certainly there may be harm done.

    I don't want anyone to think that this "technique" you speak about is safe or OK.
    You riding with a gun?

    Sorry to rant but this is upsetting, they are animals and the owners need to take responsiblity.
    No need to injure a dog with a BB gun.
    I don't want anyone to think that what you've written above is correct: there is no injury involved, just aversion training. You've probably never done it so you really have no idea.

  18. #18
    Cat 6 rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camilo
    I don't want anyone to think that what you've written above is correct: there is no injury involved, just aversion training. You've probably never done it so you really have no idea.
    Maybe you're talking about something different, but the airguns I have, even target pistols, will _easily_ break the skin and penetrate at close range, and if you hit an artery you've got a serious, even potentially lift threatening injury. A family friend was almost killed with a Red Ryder BB gun. He spent several days in the hospital. If it's you or the dog, then it should be you, but maybe a paintball gun would be better for aversion training. It would hurt more and be less likely to cause serious injury. I still favor pepper spray, though.
    To the troll mobile, away...

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by California L33
    I'd strongly advise against using a BB gun unless you really want to hurt/kill the dog. I've only had one dog chase me. It was a domestic dog,
    Lots of white trash own dogs, they don't treat them too well, the dogs are mean not unlike the owners.

    I've had a pit bull at the top of a hill that used to jack with me every time. He meant business with a pair of testicles that practically hung to the ground. I asked the owners to chain their dog, they didn't, I asked them if the dog was going to bite me, they said more than likely he will attack me. The answer by the owners made me see the light, that's when I rigged up a holster and got the air gun. That was the first dog I shot and he never comes around me anymore, when he sees me come up over the hill he runs. Next came a couple of dogs that were being used to guard a junk yard, same problem, discussed the matter with the owners he didn't care, I shot them when they came in on me, now I never see them. That gun has cleaned up my route in a way that pepper spray could never, I have many cyclists that have thanked me for taking matters into my own hands.

    In California I'd imagine you have a lot more PC going on then in Kansas. I remember reading the outrage that people felt about that chimp that was shot that attacked that women that lost both her hands, eyes, nose, and lips. Some people actually thought the chimp should have been shot with a dart and transferred to a rest home for chimps.

  20. #20
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    There seem to be two types of dogs that pose risks to cyclists. The first can be considered actual pets that often will only chase to the edge of their property and/or will respond to loud "Git"s, "Bad Dog" & etc. These are single dogs and, while they certainly bear watching, I consider them manageable.
    The second, whether someone "owns" them or not, I consider feral dogs. They often run in packs, don't listen to anything, and pose a real danger to cyclists since they will attack. I've only been chased by feral dogs twice and luckily was able to out run them, but remember, out running isn't only about speed, it's also about the angle of attack. If they're near the side of the road and see you coming, you may have a problem.
    I don't own a gun, air or otherwise, but if I had any kind of regular contact with feral dogs I believe I would get one and use it.

  21. #21
    Beetpull DeLite
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    I keep a can of Halt! next to my underseat bag. It's a Planet Bike model whose strap goes around the whole back, so I clip the Halt on the strap and then tighten it so it's held in place.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by California L33
    Maybe you're talking about something different, but the airguns I have, even target pistols, will _easily_ break the skin and penetrate at close range, and if you hit an artery you've got a serious, even potentially lift threatening injury. A family friend was almost killed with a Red Ryder BB gun. He spent several days in the hospital. If it's you or the dog, then it should be you, but maybe a paintball gun would be better for aversion training. It would hurt more and be less likely to cause serious injury. I still favor pepper spray, though.
    Yea, probably. I'm talking about a low power thing that does not penetrate the skin. I have to admit, I don't own such a pistol. I do own a very simple pump-up air BB gun and I simply have pumped it up to very low output.... and it works and I've never hurt a dog.

    I would agree with you totally that improperly done it could actually injure the dog and that would not be a good thing except in a situation where there is no choice for personal safety. For what I'm talking about (aversion training), actual injury is not required. Just a little zing to make the dog's walnut-sized brain think "uh, bicycle = pain. Don't like pain. Don't go near bicycle." Like you said, pepper spray would do the same thing. Not only stop the dog, but teach it an unpleasant association.

    Actually, I kind of threw the bb gun out there, but to me, it's probably better to have some sort of pepper spray cannister readily available and practice sending the cloud out there so it would actually work with a chasing dog. Unless stopped, the bb gun thing is pretty impractical.

    Same sort of training is done for snakes and porcupines. There might be basic philosophical differences and some absolutely don't think any painful stimulus is ever appropriate. I personally think that humanely done, it is appropriate for things like this. The key is the "administration" - needs to be effective, not just vindictive.

  23. #23
    Cat 6 rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by heathb
    Lots of white trash own dogs, they don't treat them too well, the dogs are mean not unlike the owners.

    I've had a pit bull at the top of a hill that used to jack with me every time. He meant business with a pair of testicles that practically hung to the ground. I asked the owners to chain their dog, they didn't, I asked them if the dog was going to bite me, they said more than likely he will attack me. The answer by the owners made me see the light, that's when I rigged up a holster and got the air gun. That was the first dog I shot and he never comes around me anymore, when he sees me come up over the hill he runs. Next came a couple of dogs that were being used to guard a junk yard, same problem, discussed the matter with the owners he didn't care, I shot them when they came in on me, now I never see them. That gun has cleaned up my route in a way that pepper spray could never, I have many cyclists that have thanked me for taking matters into my own hands.

    In California I'd imagine you have a lot more PC going on then in Kansas. I remember reading the outrage that people felt about that chimp that was shot that attacked that women that lost both her hands, eyes, nose, and lips. Some people actually thought the chimp should have been shot with a dart and transferred to a rest home for chimps.
    Like I said, if it's you or them, it has to be you. I wouldn't even be averse to using an actual firearm and killing a dog about to maul someone, but I take issue with someone saying that airguns don't hurt dogs. I wouldn't want to encourage people to shoot dogs with _anything_ without cause, and they should have an understanding of the full gravity of the situation- you don't want to get bitten by a feral dog, but if you pull the trigger you could cause anything from a flesh wound (which could get infected and cause a slow death- it's an easy bet that people with running pit bulls don't exactly spend a fortune on vet bills) to near instant death if you were to sever a large artery.

    Even in a PC place like Cali it's hard to get animal control to come out, but when they do they have no trouble removing free running dogs. Maybe that's why they can't balance the budget.
    To the troll mobile, away...

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by California L33
    I wouldn't want to encourage people to shoot dogs with _anything_ without cause, and they should have an understanding of the full gravity of the situation- you don't want to get bitten by a feral dog, but if you pull the trigger you could cause anything from a flesh wound (which could get infected and cause a slow death- it's an easy bet that people with running pit bulls don't exactly spend a fortune on vet bills) to near instant death if you were to sever a large artery.
    Shooting in town can get you in trouble in certain cities. As well as getting your name in the newspaper which none of us need. If you only ride in town never carry an air gun, just keep riding and try to out run them, few domesticated dogs are in real shape, they're a lot like domesticated people.

    I live right in front of a highway and only have to ride about 5 blocks through the city and and then I'm out on the road where there's maybe a farmer every couple of miles. Some of these areas are very secluded. People do as they please in those parts, law enforcement is scarce. You do what you need to do to get in and out of some of these areas alive when you might run into at least a couple of dogs everyday. A dogs life expectancy in some of these areas might be a couple of years at the most, either they'll get ran over, shot or die from an illness or perhaps the coyotes will bate them in with an in heat female and the males will rip them to pieces.

  25. #25
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