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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    If you have to buy a bike with disc brakes, I would definitely get hydraulic. Hydraulic are self-adjusting after initial setup and have better modulation. Since disc brakes are very powerful, modulation is important unless you enjoy face plants.
    Have you actually seen someone do a face plant on the road?

    If I do a face plant, I doubt it is the brakes fault regardless of the type of brake

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herbie View Post
    Have you actually seen someone do a face plant on the road?

    If I do a face plant, I doubt it is the brakes fault regardless of the type of brake
    Yes I have and I can assure you it's not pretty. Granted there are other reasons people do face plants besides brake lockup, but that is still a legitimate concern, especially among less experienced cyclists.

    I have ridden both mechanical disc and hydraulic disc bikes. I would never own a mechanical disc bike, period.
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  3. #28
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    My last bike came with BB5s. They work better than rim brakes but need frequent (read: < 100 miles) adjustment, which I couldn't abide on a commuter. An RBR member talked me into replacing them with XTs instead of BB7s and I've never looked back.

    Here's the thing: once you get above a certain price point I'd expect hydro, not mechanical. Why put cheap brakes on a nice bike? I'd look askance at mechs on a $2100 bike.
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  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtrac View Post
    My last bike came with BB5s. They work better than rim brakes but need frequent (read: < 100 miles) adjustment, which I couldn't abide on a commuter. An RBR member talked me into replacing them with XTs instead of BB7s and I've never looked back.

    Here's the thing: once you get above a certain price point I'd expect hydro, not mechanical. Why put cheap brakes on a nice bike? I'd look askance at mechs on a $2100 bike.
    There are plenty of good current rim brakes with surprisingly good modulation compared to rim brakes of yesteryear. I have never needed to re-adjust any rim brakes more often than every 500 miles.

    I have ridden multiple bikes with mechanical discs and all failed to please. I found them quite grabby and unpredictable. And <100 mile re-adjustment is a joke.

    Now I have my first hydraulic disc bike. I am actually quite impressed by the modulation and predictability or braking. It feels nearly impossible to lock these up, yet there is plenty of braking power. And hydraulic brakes are self-adjusting, so you never need to re-adjust them after initial adjustment. One important note for noobies. If you need to remove the front wheel for transport, be very careful not to let the front brake handle pull. Otherwise, the brake will re-adjust itself without a disc. Then you will get brake rub! In order to set up adjustment again, you will need something narrow to separate the calipers.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbinbi View Post
    Very happy with rim brakes. Don't carry if I have anything better. Just don't want more hassle etc. than what I have with rim brakes. Which is basically adjusting the barrel nut every once a year or 2. If mechanical disks are going to be a PITA, then maybe an upgrade is important. If not, then no issue with them to save $700

    2018 models are shipping, specialized hasn't updated their website. A 2018 elite is $600 less than 2017 model with upgrade of hydraulic and dt swiss wheels
    Have you spent any time with respectable hydro disc brakes on like hills/mountains or crappy weather?

    While I'm happy with rims in these conditions most of the times, when you really need that extra performance you get from hydro disc, it's great to have
    It's a fire road.............
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    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtrac View Post
    Why put cheap brakes on a nice bike? I'd look askance at mechs on a $2100 bike.
    You're right, they should cost more. I'll pass that along to TRP. If it isn't painful to buy, it can't be trusted.

  7. #32
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    I have Spyre C mechanicals and they are not a problem. They have (so far) stayed adjusted (and they do self-center ... I have QR axles and have removed a wheel and replaced it no problem.) They don't offer the kind of braking the Hydro discs on my MTB do .... they are on par with Ultegra or Tiagra brakes, except they work immediately on rainy days (which is why they are on my rain bike.)

    One big issue, for those who care, is weight. No matter how you slice it (or lie about it, which I have seen folks do) a disc set-up is going to weigh at least twice as much. Sure that might be 800 grams versus 320 or something ... but if you are buying an expensive lightweight bike which ends up weighing as as much as a cheap, heavier bike with rim brakes because the lighter bike has discs .... might give on pause.

    I am considering going with TRP HY/RDs on my next bike a century bike---designed slightly more for comfort more than performance. HY/RD (from anecdote) seem to offer all the stopping power and a little less stress than full hydro. But I am torn, because as much as I like the idea ... Shimano rim brakes are really all the brakes I need on 99.27 % of my rides---rain included.

  8. #33
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    Both of my lowracers use disc brake in front and rim brake in back. Since I'm unwilling to have mis-matched brake levers, that means mechanical disc in front. These days, the Tektro models Spyre/Spyke or the Hy/Rd would be the only mechanicals I would consider, the reason being, like hydraulics they move both pads instead of using the outside pad to push the rotor into the inside pad. Moving both pads means you can adjust them to have more pad clearance and no squealing because the inside pad is too far from the rotor. Getting them 'dialed in' is easier and they tend to stay dialed in.

    I've tried hydros and they definitely have a nicer, smoother feel. That alone would be worth something.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbinbi View Post
    Very happy with rim brakes. Don't carry if I have anything better. Just don't want more hassle etc. than what I have with rim brakes. Which is basically adjusting the barrel nut every once a year or 2. If mechanical disks are going to be a PITA, then maybe an upgrade is important. If not, then no issue with them to save $700

    2018 models are shipping, specialized hasn't updated their website. A 2018 elite is $600 less than 2017 model with upgrade of hydraulic and dt swiss wheels
    Aren't hydraulic brakes more of a pain? I think they might require more specialized maintenance which would cost more. I only have a mountain bike with mechanical so my opinion is solely based on what I've seen from bike mechanics on YouTube, so please take this with a grain of salt.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by commuterbik View Post
    Aren't hydraulic brakes more of a pain? I think they might require more specialized maintenance which would cost more. I only have a mountain bike with mechanical so my opinion is solely based on what I've seen from bike mechanics on YouTube, so please take this with a grain of salt.
    No, it's just different. Instead of cable changes, you'll need to bleed. And you'll be replacing the hydro hoses a whole lot less than housing, which can be annoying if you have internally routed cables/hoses.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by commuterbik View Post
    Aren't hydraulic brakes more of a pain? I think they might require more specialized maintenance which would cost more. I only have a mountain bike with mechanical so my opinion is solely based on what I've seen from bike mechanics on YouTube, so please take this with a grain of salt.
    A different animal for sure, but I wouldn't say more of a pain. Just different. In fact, once you set up and adjust hydraulic brakes initially, they are self-adjusting just like the brakes on your car. So in that sense, less trouble. The one thing to watch is to not let a brake handle get pulled while your wheel is removed. If there is no disc between the pads, the calipers will re-adjust for this and you will have brake rub once you put your wheel back in. You will have to set them up all over again.

    Hydraulic has so much nicer modulation - none of that grabby feel you get with mechanical.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

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  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by beeristasty View Post
    No, it's just different. Instead of cable changes, you'll need to bleed. And you'll be replacing the hydro hoses a whole lot less than housing, which can be annoying if you have internally routed cables/hoses.
    Good point on the internal routing.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by commuterbik View Post
    Aren't hydraulic brakes more of a pain? I think they might require more specialized maintenance which would cost more. I only have a mountain bike with mechanical so my opinion is solely based on what I've seen from bike mechanics on YouTube, so please take this with a grain of salt.
    the initial set up is a bit more specialized, but it's not rocket science. On my mtb shimano brakes, I set them up and have had to swap pads twice in 2 yrs. Beyond that, they just work.

    SRAM uses DOT fluid which can absorb moisture and reduce performance. I have done bleeds/flush once a year. They did not really need it, but it was just a preventative maint thing.
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Hydraulic has so much nicer modulation - none of that grabby feel you get with mechanical.
    You're describing pads and rotors. The Spyre with the stock pads isn't grabby.

    A caveat with hydraulic is that there aren't many adjustments. With the Spyre (again, the archetype for what a mechanical brake should be), you can adjust the contact point and the leverage ratio, in addition to whatever reach adjustment the paired levers allow.

    Hydraulic brakes require adjustment less frequently, but when you do need to, it tends to be a bigger job. I get enough of syringes with my mountain bike.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by beeristasty View Post
    No, it's just different. Instead of cable changes, you'll need to bleed. And you'll be replacing the hydro hoses a whole lot less than housing, which can be annoying if you have internally routed cables/hoses.
    Have you experienced sticky pistons, where one retracts and the other doesn't causing the pads to rub the rotor? What a pain. Mechanicals don't have that problem.


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  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfdemicco View Post
    Have you experienced sticky pistons, where one retracts and the other doesn't causing the pads to rub the rotor? What a pain. Mechanicals don't have that problem.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    What I like about my mechanicals is that if the disc rubs a pad, it really easy to realign them by just loosening the mount bolt, and while squeezing the brake lever, tighten the mount bolt and presto chango, they are perfectly set.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfdemicco View Post
    Have you experienced sticky pistons, where one retracts and the other doesn't causing the pads to rub the rotor? What a pain. Mechanicals don't have that problem.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Nope. Each system has its advantages and disadvantages. From my experiences, I'd take hydros over mechs any day of the week.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by commuterbik View Post
    What I like about my mechanicals is that if the disc rubs a pad, it really easy to realign them by just loosening the mount bolt, and while squeezing the brake lever, tighten the mount bolt and presto chango, they are perfectly set.
    This is how all disc brakes are set up.

  19. #44
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  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by commuterbik View Post
    What I like about my mechanicals is that if the disc rubs a pad, it really easy to realign them by just loosening the mount bolt, and while squeezing the brake lever, tighten the mount bolt and presto chango, they are perfectly set.
    I have Spyres & had trouble with that method. I had to use paper as shims between pads & rotor, then squeeze to set the housings or else one side would rub.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexdi View Post
    Hydraulic brakes require adjustment less frequently, but when you do need to, it tends to be a bigger job. I get enough of syringes with my mountain bike.
    Adjustments on hydraulics aren't as difficult as you seem to imply here. If they do get out of adjustment, a caliper spreader is pretty much all you need.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
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    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveRider View Post
    I have Spyres & had trouble with that method. I had to use paper as shims between pads & rotor, then squeeze to set the housings or else one side would rub.
    They've got hex pad adjustments on both sides. This shouldn't be necessary.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Adjustments on hydraulics aren't as difficult as you seem to imply here. If they do get out of adjustment, a caliper spreader is pretty much all you need.
    You bleed with a caliper spreader?

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexdi View Post
    You bleed with a caliper spreader?
    You do not need to bleed in order to re-adjust your calipers.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    You do not need to bleed in order to re-adjust your calipers.
    You do if they're low on fluid. Let's not quibble over the meaning of adjust; bleeding is part of owning hydraulic brakes. That, alone, is a sizeable argument for mechanical.

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