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Thread: Need help fast!

  1. #26
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    This may have been mentioned already.

    The idea of flat bars may be attractive to someone new to cycling. In my opinion you will find a properly fitted drop bar bike more comfortable for most road/gravel riding. One of the reasons is that flat bars have more limited positions for your hands. Drop bars allow you to place your hands in a variety of positions. As noted by Lombard, a gravel/adventure bike is a great choice for mixed surfaces.

    I'm in my 50's and have two bikes that I use regularly. One is a carbon frame road bike (Giant Defy) with 25mm tires that I use for road riding/fast group rides/racing. The other is a steel frame gravel/adventure bike (Salsa Vaya) with 40mm tires that I use for commuting/running errands/gravel roads. I did my first 200 mile ride last year on the Defy and I've done >100 mile gravel rides on the Vaya.

    It hard to explain the difference between the two bikes. The Salsa is more stable and offers a more forgiving ride albeit a bit slower then the Giant.

    a quote from this article: https://pelotonmagazine.com/home-pag...ycle%E2%88%97/

    “It would be much better to call these bicycles what they are: the most efficient, most practical, lowest consumption, most sustainable, most socially accountable method of human transportation from point A to point B over the widest range of surfaces ever invented. Of course, this long definition is totally impractical but it does describe what these new bicycles are. I would prefer they be called universal bikes or SUBs, Sport Utility Bikes,” says Bryne.

    The best advice has already been given. You need to ride as many different bikes as you can. And don't just ride lots of different bikes in the same category. Try a number of bikes of different styles.

  2. #27
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    It had not been mentioned. Thank you for your comments. Very helpful.
    Quote Originally Posted by J.R. View Post
    This may have been mentioned already.

    The idea of flat bars may be attractive to someone new to cycling. In my opinion you will find a properly fitted drop bar bike more comfortable for most road/gravel riding. One of the reasons is that flat bars have more limited positions for your hands. Drop bars allow you to place your hands in a variety of positions. As noted by Lombard, a gravel/adventure bike is a great choice for mixed surfaces.

    I'm in my 50's and have two bikes that I use regularly. One is a carbon frame road bike (Giant Defy) with 25mm tires that I use for road riding/fast group rides/racing. The other is a steel frame gravel/adventure bike (Salsa Vaya) with 40mm tires that I use for commuting/running errands/gravel roads. I did my first 200 mile ride last year on the Defy and I've done >100 mile gravel rides on the Vaya.

    It hard to explain the difference between the two bikes. The Salsa is more stable and offers a more forgiving ride albeit a bit slower then the Giant.

    a quote from this article: https://pelotonmagazine.com/home-pag...ycle%E2%88%97/

    “It would be much better to call these bicycles what they are: the most efficient, most practical, lowest consumption, most sustainable, most socially accountable method of human transportation from point A to point B over the widest range of surfaces ever invented. Of course, this long definition is totally impractical but it does describe what these new bicycles are. I would prefer they be called universal bikes or SUBs, Sport Utility Bikes,” says Bryne.

    The best advice has already been given. You need to ride as many different bikes as you can. And don't just ride lots of different bikes in the same category. Try a number of bikes of different styles.

  3. #28
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    Thank you very much for your comments.
    Quote Originally Posted by mrcookie View Post
    even if the performance sale ends friday, there will be another one next week, or the week after. generally speaking once their bikes drop in price that's where the price tends to stay, and they will continue to show how much savings it is over it's "original" price (and it was probably never sold at that price in the first place).

    maybe it's the perfect bike for you, but i'm with everyone else, don't be time pressured into a purchase. that's a recipe for buyers remorse (although performance would likely take it back for a while anyway).

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.R. View Post
    This may have been mentioned already.

    The idea of flat bars may be attractive to someone new to cycling. In my opinion you will find a properly fitted drop bar bike more comfortable for most road/gravel riding. One of the reasons is that flat bars have more limited positions for your hands. Drop bars allow you to place your hands in a variety of positions.
    Yes and no. If you never have any intention of using the drops, you have two possible hand positions on road bars. And if you want more hand positions on flat or riser bars, you can attach bar ends - that will give you two.

    That is not to say that road bar bikes don't have other niceties. STI shifters are much nicer to use than any of the shifter options on flat or riser bar bikes - whether they are thumb shifters or grip shifters which don't shift anywhere near as smoothly.

    Quote Originally Posted by J.R. View Post
    The best advice has already been given. You need to ride as many different bikes as you can. And don't just ride lots of different bikes in the same category. Try a number of bikes of different styles.
    This!!!
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  5. #30
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    Any good bike shop should have a good fit device that they can put you on to size the bike properly to your anatomy, flexibility, etc. The shop should also have an experienced and qualified bike fitter. This will go a long way in assuring you get the right bike.

  6. #31
    pmf
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    I have to agree with what many are saying about Performance. I buy stuff there occasionally, but I know what I want and don't ask the staff there for advice because they don't know anything about bicycles. Most of the sales people I've spoken to don't even ride bikes. The mechanics there are kids -- I'd never take a bike to Performance for any service.

    Yes, their prices are good, but you'll get as much good advice as you would buying a bike over the internet. Find a local shop and spend some time talking to the folks there. If they have an attitude, or are pushy, go to the next one. Once you find a place you like, it'll be worth the extra money you'll pay.

  7. #32
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    Thank you. that's good advice.

    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    I have to agree with what many are saying about Performance. I buy stuff there occasionally, but I know what I want and don't ask the staff there for advice because they don't know anything about bicycles. Most of the sales people I've spoken to don't even ride bikes. The mechanics there are kids -- I'd never take a bike to Performance for any service.

    Yes, their prices are good, but you'll get as much good advice as you would buying a bike over the internet. Find a local shop and spend some time talking to the folks there. If they have an attitude, or are pushy, go to the next one. Once you find a place you like, it'll be worth the extra money you'll pay.

  8. #33
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    Fitting

    Lots of great advice already about types of bikes, pricing, using your local bike shop. A number of posts talked about fitting. That can be pretty intimidating for a novice. However, there are some great online videos that talk about how to fit a bike.

    Here is a detailed description of bike fitting - https://blog.bikefit.com/how-to-fit-a-road-bicycle/

    GCN has some short intro videos that can help https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VYhyppWTDc and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cofyIZt0dmE

    Art's Cycle is also a great source for help. They have a fit video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrZBjOloChg

    My summary of advice
    Your old "rules of thumb" about a good bike no longer apply. It is amazing the strides manufacturers have made in the last 10 years. Don't go into the process with any preconceptions.

    Check around for a local bike club. Many offer social rides and people in the club are happy to talk bikes! You might even be able to find nice deals on bikes from club members.

    Visit 3-5 local bike shops (that carry different brands) and ask for help and a test ride. Do the test ride on surfaces that you are likely to actually ride (like rough roads). You will definitely feel a difference across models and frame materials.

    Drop bars are often more comfortable than flat bars

    Look for a frame with an "upright" riding position. That means you can have the handlebars above the seat (Bike like the Trek Domane and Specialized Roubiax - plus MANY other makes/models)

    You might also look for an "endurance" bike. These allow for wider tires (28c tires or greater). The larger tires allow you to have a more comfortable ride without sacrificing efficiency.

    If you live in an area with lots of rain and you expect to ride in the rain, disk brakes sure are nice

    Carbon is nice if you can afford it. Steel can be more comfortable than Aluminium.

    Local shops often have sales or "last year's models" at discount. Just remember, if a bike is lower priced, they cut corners someplace.

    Components are important. For Shimano get 105 or Ultegra. Dura Ace isn't worth it unless you ride ALOT.

    A little secret is that wheelsets are just as important as frames. Wheelsets can make a noticeable different in ride and efficiency. Most bike will go cheap on wheelsets since most buyers don't appreciate their value.

    As mentioned by others, be careful of buying based on price. It is an easy trap to fall into. Your thinking "I'm just going to ride a few miles - why pay more." Well, you will ride a nice bike more than a crappy bike. If you do ride more you will appreciate the nicer bike vs having to upgrade. A few more dollars can get you a lifetime bike vs something you will ultimately regret. But also don't feel you have to spend a fortune.

    Best of luck with your search. It can be intimidating - just try to make it fun.

  9. #34
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    Performance has a decent product selection and prices, however their website is a nightmare, and their customer service is pathetic. Good luck if you have an issue. I used them for years but finally gave up because their service is so bad. I recommend that you not buy from Performance.

  10. #35
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    Thank you for your in depth comments. They are much appreciated.

    Quote Originally Posted by wsuv View Post
    Lots of great advice already about types of bikes, pricing, using your local bike shop. A number of posts talked about fitting. That can be pretty intimidating for a novice. However, there are some great online videos that talk about how to fit a bike.

    Here is a detailed description of bike fitting - https://blog.bikefit.com/how-to-fit-a-road-bicycle/

    GCN has some short intro videos that can help https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VYhyppWTDc and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cofyIZt0dmE

    Art's Cycle is also a great source for help. They have a fit video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrZBjOloChg

    My summary of advice
    Your old "rules of thumb" about a good bike no longer apply. It is amazing the strides manufacturers have made in the last 10 years. Don't go into the process with any preconceptions.

    Check around for a local bike club. Many offer social rides and people in the club are happy to talk bikes! You might even be able to find nice deals on bikes from club members.

    Visit 3-5 local bike shops (that carry different brands) and ask for help and a test ride. Do the test ride on surfaces that you are likely to actually ride (like rough roads). You will definitely feel a difference across models and frame materials.

    Drop bars are often more comfortable than flat bars

    Look for a frame with an "upright" riding position. That means you can have the handlebars above the seat (Bike like the Trek Domane and Specialized Roubiax - plus MANY other makes/models)

    You might also look for an "endurance" bike. These allow for wider tires (28c tires or greater). The larger tires allow you to have a more comfortable ride without sacrificing efficiency.

    If you live in an area with lots of rain and you expect to ride in the rain, disk brakes sure are nice

    Carbon is nice if you can afford it. Steel can be more comfortable than Aluminium.

    Local shops often have sales or "last year's models" at discount. Just remember, if a bike is lower priced, they cut corners someplace.

    Components are important. For Shimano get 105 or Ultegra. Dura Ace isn't worth it unless you ride ALOT.

    A little secret is that wheelsets are just as important as frames. Wheelsets can make a noticeable different in ride and efficiency. Most bike will go cheap on wheelsets since most buyers don't appreciate their value.

    As mentioned by others, be careful of buying based on price. It is an easy trap to fall into. Your thinking "I'm just going to ride a few miles - why pay more." Well, you will ride a nice bike more than a crappy bike. If you do ride more you will appreciate the nicer bike vs having to upgrade. A few more dollars can get you a lifetime bike vs something you will ultimately regret. But also don't feel you have to spend a fortune.

    Best of luck with your search. It can be intimidating - just try to make it fun.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by wsuv View Post
    Components are important. For Shimano get 105 or Ultegra. Dura Ace isn't worth it unless you ride ALOT.
    Would you care to elaborate on this? If anything, the Dura-Ace cassette will wear out faster because it is titaniam, not steel. Steel chain vs. titanium cassette. Steel wins! In other words, kiss your titanium cassette good-bye in 2,000 miles.

    I own bikes with 105 5800 and Ultegra 6800. I don't find the Ultegra any better than the 105 - they both shift flawlessly!
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  12. #37
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Would you care to elaborate on this? If anything, the Dura-Ace cassette will wear out faster because it is titaniam, not steel. Steel chain vs. titanium cassette. Steel wins! In other words, kiss your titanium cassette good-bye in 2,000 miles.

    I own bikes with 105 5800 and Ultegra 6800. I don't find the Ultegra any better than the 105 - they both shift flawlessly!
    My wife has bikes with Dura Ace 9000 and 9100 (I'm a Campy guy). When I buy the group, it comes with a Dura Ace cassette. so I put the cassette on when I build up the bike. It doesn't last as long as a steel Ultegra cassette, but considerably longer than 2000 miles. Only the bigger cogs that don't get the majority of the use are titanium. And when it does wear out, I buy steel Ultegra cassettes because they last longer, weigh hardly much more, and cost half as much. As for the rest of the group, it's lighter and shifts nicer than Ultegra. Twice as nice? Not even close, but nicer. She rides a lot (5000 miles last year) and feels that the nicer group is worth an extra $600 over the long run. I'm not saying 105 or Ultegra aren't very good because they are. Or that the cost differential between Dura Ace and 105 passes the benefit cost test for most people -- because it probably doesn't. It does to some though.

    wsuv make a valid point.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    My wife has bikes with Dura Ace 9000 and 9100 (I'm a Campy guy). When I buy the group, it comes with a Dura Ace cassette. so I put the cassette on when I build up the bike. It doesn't last as long as a steel Ultegra cassette, but considerably longer than 2000 miles. Only the bigger cogs that don't get the majority of the use are titanium. And when it does wear out, I buy steel Ultegra cassettes because they last longer, weigh hardly much more, and cost half as much. As for the rest of the group, it's lighter and shifts nicer than Ultegra. Twice as nice? Not even close, but nicer. She rides a lot (5000 miles last year) and feels that the nicer group is worth an extra $600 over the long run. I'm not saying 105 or Ultegra aren't very good because they are. Or that the cost differential between Dura Ace and 105 passes the benefit cost test for most people -- because it probably doesn't. It does to some though.

    wsuv make a valid point.
    This is impressive. I didn't think a Shimano-Campy marriage could work. That is a tough difference to overcome!

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    This is impressive. I didn't think a Shimano-Campy marriage could work. That is a tough difference to overcome!
    There are some things we do not speak of ...

  15. #40
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    I think this is what's called a Mixed Marriage.

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    This is impressive. I didn't think a Shimano-Campy marriage could work. That is a tough difference to overcome!

  16. #41
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    At your age and taking your account as new to biking literal, there is no way to know what is the best bike for you in terms of style, (road, mountain, commuter, cross, or fitness, etc.)

    Buy the very low end priced bike of a reputable band such as Trek, Giant, Fuji, etc. Get properly fitted. After you have been riding it regularly for several months or more you will then have a clear idea of where to turn for the type of bike you want and what you are willing to pay.

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