Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 86
  1. #51
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    30
    So, unimaginably, a quick test of 1/5th the price resin pads instead of finned sintered ones completely muted the brakes (exact same method of bedding in - brake firmly from good speed without locking wheels about 10-15 times).

    However, one of the pistons in the other caliper doesn't move at even speeds even after cleaning and bleeding, which keeps bending the rotor. They don't sell those separately, so gonna have to replace the whole caliper.

    Otherwise, everything's nice apart from few things nothing to do with brakes. Completely fixable as well tho.

    Last edited by nimetonmaili; 05-09-2018 at 05:07 AM.

  2. #52
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,026
    Quote Originally Posted by nimetonmaili View Post
    So, unimaginably, a quick test of 1/5th the price resin pads instead of finned sintered ones completely muted the brakes (exact same method of bedding in - brake firmly from good speed without locking wheels about 10-15 times).

    However, one of the pistons in the other caliper doesn't move at even speeds even after cleaning and bleeding, which keeps bending the rotor. They don't sell those separately, so gonna have to replace the whole caliper.

    Otherwise, everything's nice apart from few things nothing to do with brakes. Completely fixable as well tho.

    I'd spend some time trying to get the pistons to move evenly before buying a new caliper. Pull the pads out and get some mineral oil. Carefully pump the lever a couple of times to expose some of the piston and apply a few drops of mineral oil to the piston. Push it back into the caliper. Repeat as necessary. Use a plastic tire lever to push the piston to avoid damaging it. When you get them moving the same clean up w/ isopropyl.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  3. #53
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    359
    Quote Originally Posted by nimetonmaili View Post
    So, unimaginably, a quick test of 1/5th the price resin pads instead of finned sintered ones completely muted the brakes (exact same method of bedding in - brake firmly from good speed without locking wheels about 10-15 times).

    However, one of the pistons in the other caliper doesn't move at even speeds even after cleaning and bleeding, which keeps bending the rotor. They don't sell those separately, so gonna have to replace the whole caliper.

    Otherwise, everything's nice apart from few things nothing to do with brakes. Completely fixable as well tho.

    You're splitting hairs with this one. A little bit of flex in the disc will not cause it to bend/warp and it wont effect braking power or pad wear. You definitely don't need to replace the caliper anyway. Could just be a bubble behind one of the pistons causing it to move a little slow. Just tap both sides of the caliper with a wrench to dislodge any bubbles and bleed it. Should only ever need to do that once unless you take the pistons out for some reason.

    Glad the resin pads fixed the squealing. Resin pads still have tons of braking power and they're plenty durable. There are extremely few exceptions that would require sintered pads.

  4. #54
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    765
    Are you guys saying most all "hydraulic" brake systems on the market will 'squeal" like this if you don't regularly maintain them? I mean, ole'd rim pads are plug and forget for something like 10k miles.

    How often is this "cleaning" and "adjusting" of them going on?

    My skepticism of "hydraulic" brakes might turn into outright hatred if you guys say this has to be performed fairly often. The only disc brakes I heard squeal were the very early versions, that were not 'hydraulic', and the squeal only happened when they either sprinted and/or braked.

    Thus I thought the "hydraulic" and "direct-mounted" brakes removed all this worry....????

  5. #55
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by Fajita Dave View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nimetonmaili View Post
    However, one of the pistons in the other caliper doesn't move at even speeds even after cleaning and bleeding, which keeps bending the rotor.
    Could just be a bubble behind one of the pistons causing it to move a little slow. Just tap both sides of the caliper with a wrench to dislodge any bubbles and bleed it.
    Need 10 characters.

  6. #56
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    Are you guys saying most all "hydraulic" brake systems on the market will 'squeal" like this if you don't regularly maintain them? I mean, ole'd rim pads are plug and forget for something like 10k miles.

    How often is this "cleaning" and "adjusting" of them going on?

    My skepticism of "hydraulic" brakes might turn into outright hatred if you guys say this has to be performed fairly often. The only disc brakes I heard squeal were the very early versions, that were not 'hydraulic', and the squeal only happened when they either sprinted and/or braked.

    Thus I thought the "hydraulic" and "direct-mounted" brakes removed all this worry....????
    Not sure you read the thread.

    For my permantently squealing brakes the fix was 6€ resin pads. The pistons moving unevenly, not sure, will have to see, but havent really heard of "most all" hydraulics acting like this. Certainly plenty more than rims (less tolerance), but people with no issues rarely create threads about it. Maybe a few "never had any problems" or "haven't touched them apart from changing pads for 3 years" here and there.

    But if you want to "hate" them, go ahead, it's a free world.
    Last edited by nimetonmaili; 05-10-2018 at 01:38 AM.

  7. #57
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,170
    Quote Originally Posted by nimetonmaili View Post

    But if you want to "hate" them, go ahead, it's a free world.
    Cool. Done.

    And in response.... if you read the forums, there are plenty of regularly-encountered issues like this with disc brakes. Where are all the rim brake problem threads???
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  8. #58
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by nimetonmaili View Post
    Not sure you read the thread.

    For my permantently squealing brakes the fix was 6€ resin pads. The pistons moving unevenly, not sure, will have to see, but havent really heard of "most all" hydraulics acting like this. Certainly plenty more than rims (less tolerance), but people with no issues rarely create threads about it. Maybe a few "never had any problems" or "haven't touched them apart from changing pads for 3 years" here and there.

    But if you want to "hate" them, go ahead, it's a free world.

    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    Cool. Done.

    And in response.... if you read the forums, there are plenty of regularly-encountered issues like this with disc brakes. Where are all the rim brake problem threads???
    Did you read the post you're replying to?

  9. #59
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Srode's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,907
    Quote Originally Posted by nimetonmaili View Post
    So, unimaginably, a quick test of 1/5th the price resin pads instead of finned sintered ones
    How much were you paying for the resign pads? I just bought a couple pairs of the metalic / sintered pads for $19 each, can't imagine resin pads being 1/5th of that ($4/pair).
    Moderation is boring - do epic s##t

    Trek Domane
    Niner RLT9 (Gravel Bike)
    Trek Crockett

  10. #60
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by Srode View Post
    How much were you paying for the resign pads? I just bought a couple pairs of the metalic / sintered pads for $19 each, can't imagine resin pads being 1/5th of that ($4/pair).
    Oh. I got the G02A for 6€, but apparently that's a major discount, since the J04C price is down too: Bike-Components - G02A, Bike-Components - J04C

    I just remember getting them for 30€ before.

  11. #61
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    295
    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    Cool. Done.

    And in response.... if you read the forums, there are plenty of regularly-encountered issues like this with disc brakes. Where are all the rim brake problem threads???
    Selection bias.

    The people using rim brakes don't complain because they die from not being able to stop fast enough.

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

  12. #62
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,299
    Oh dear, I'm out of popcorn.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  13. #63
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    359
    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    Cool. Done.

    And in response.... if you read the forums, there are plenty of regularly-encountered issues like this with disc brakes. Where are all the rim brake problem threads???
    Perhaps roadies can't handle the extreme complexity of hydraulic disc brakes.

    Poking fun aside they are not a headache to deal with and certainly not a headache to maintain. Squealing is solved by using resin pads more often than not but if your brakes are wet they will most likely squeal. Bleeding is stupid easy with Shimano brakes on the rare occasion you actually need to. It shouldn't take more then 15mins to bleed both ends. You literally never need to clean the rotors unless you're careless and get some sort of lube on them (same as rim only they do need to be cleaned occasionally).

    There's a learning curve to any new piece of equipment. Just like learning how to adjust derailluers for the first time.

  14. #64
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,026
    Quote Originally Posted by Fajita Dave View Post
    Perhaps roadies can't handle the extreme complexity of hydraulic disc brakes.

    Poking fun aside they are not a headache to deal with and certainly not a headache to maintain. Squealing is solved by using resin pads more often than not but if your brakes are wet they will most likely squeal. Bleeding is stupid easy with Shimano brakes on the rare occasion you actually need to. It shouldn't take more then 15mins to bleed both ends. You literally never need to clean the rotors unless you're careless and get some sort of lube on them (same as rim only they do need to be cleaned occasionally).

    There's a learning curve to any new piece of equipment. Just like learning how to adjust derailluers for the first time.
    ^All of this...^
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  15. #65
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1,170
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    ^All of this...^
    And yet.... lots of threads on disc brake issues...

    I still maintain there’s nothing that isn’t easier/faster with rim brakes. Surely you don’t contest that CX??


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  16. #66
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,026
    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    And yet.... lots of threads on disc brake issues...

    I still maintain there’s nothing that isn’t easier/faster with rim brakes. Surely you don’t contest that CX??


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Rim brakes are very easy (most of them anyway) to work on. Some disc brakes are a pain, so are some rim brakes. At least you don't have to deal w/ brake fluid/mineral oil w/ rim brakes. Given the performance and other benefits of disc brakes I'd say they're worth any hassle.
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  17. #67
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,771
    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Rim brakes are very easy (most of them anyway) to work on. Some disc brakes are a pain, so are some rim brakes. At least you don't have to deal w/ brake fluid/mineral oil w/ rim brakes. Given the performance and other benefits of disc brakes I'd say they're worth any hassle.
    Except when utterly not needed for a pure road bike.

    I love my disc brakes on my mtb and gravel bikes, have had all brands over the years and have settled on Shimano.

    They are cake to operate and maintain.

  18. #68
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    7,557
    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    Except when utterly not needed for a pure road bike.
    I wish I lived where there were "pure" roads instead of these dammed long disracting climbs followed by fast twisting descents.

    It must be like heaven?

  19. #69
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,771
    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    dammed long disracting climbs followed by fast twisting descents.
    I agree, but I don't do super long climbs all the time with return miles of steep downhills.

    On the occasion that I do a 26 mile mountain climb, I'll just take my aluminum wheeled rig.

    Over heating and boiling the brake fluid would be my only concern on a ride like that with discs.

  20. #70
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    7,557
    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    Cool. Done.

    And in response.... if you read the forums, there are plenty of regularly-encountered issues like this with disc brakes. Where are all the rim brake problem threads???
    I'm not seeing many spoon-brake threads either. I guess that's a sign that you folks have worked out the issues?

  21. #71
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    7,557
    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post

    Over heating and boiling the brake fluid would be my only concern on a ride like that with discs.
    Yep. That and the fact that brake fluid is a magnet for lightening strikes.

  22. #72
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,299
    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    Over heating and boiling the brake fluid would be my only concern on a ride like that with discs.
    Not a problem if you know how to apply your brakes.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  23. #73
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,771
    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    Yep. That and the fact that brake fluid is a magnet for lightening strikes.
    Yep that too, so why risk it?

  24. #74
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,771
    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Not a problem if you know how to apply your brakes.
    I generally squeeze the lever when my brain says Slow Down or you're gonna yardsale.

    Is there any other way?

  25. #75
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,299
    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    I generally squeeze the lever when my brain says Slow Down or you're gonna yardsale.

    Is there any other way?
    Rather than ride the brakes, operate front and rear alternately a second apart each. This will allow enough time in between applications for the discs to cool.

    That is unless you wait until you need the braking force of both and rear at the same time in order to prevent crashing. If you're that foolish, nothing is going to save you.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. overhauling Shimano LX Feehub
    By daniell in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 11-09-2008, 05:12 PM
  2. Overhauling Pedals
    By daniell in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-01-2007, 06:03 PM
  3. overhauling hub (for beginner)
    By steel515 in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-07-2006, 07:01 PM
  4. Overhauling Mavic Ksyrium SL hubs
    By CoachRob in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 02-08-2005, 02:30 PM
  5. Overhauling advice on Dura Ace BB (Octalink)
    By NoMSG in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 12-28-2004, 09:15 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.