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  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Rather than ride the brakes, operate front and rear alternately a second apart each. This will allow enough time in between applications for the discs to cool.

    That is unless you wait until you need the braking force of both and rear at the same time in order to prevent crashing. If you're that foolish, nothing is going to save you.
    I don't ride my brakes all the way down the hill.

    It's wide open then hard braking.

    No alternative braking for me.

  2. #77
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    This discussion reminds me of discussions I heard when personal computers were still young. Somebody had a problem with DOS 2.3. and the reactions were predictable. There always was the equivalent of “For my permanently squealing brakes the fix was 6€ resin pads.”

    (What are you complaining about? The solution is simple! If only you knew what you were doing, man. DOS 2.3. is fine, a huge improvement over DOS 2.1.! If you don’t see that, you’re the problem! You don’t want to go back to mechanical typewriters, do you, dumbo luddite?)

    Not saying personal computers were a bad idea. In the end, even Microsoft programmed a decent operating system. Just saying that for an independent observer, these discussions create the impression that it pays to wait until the issues are ironed out.

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by HFroller View Post
    This discussion reminds me of discussions I heard when personal computers were still young. Somebody had a problem with DOS 2.3. and the reactions were predictable. There always was the equivalent of “For my permanently squealing brakes the fix was 6€ resin pads.”

    (What are you complaining about? The solution is simple! If only you knew what you were doing, man. DOS 2.3. is fine, a huge improvement over DOS 2.1.! If you don’t see that, you’re the problem! You don’t want to go back to mechanical typewriters, do you, dumbo luddite?)

    Not saying personal computers were a bad idea. In the end, even Microsoft programmed a decent operating system. Just saying that for an independent observer, these discussions create the impression that it pays to wait until the issues are ironed out.
    The issues ARE ironed out. We've been running them on mtb bikes for years. The problem is the crowd that have only recently started using them on road bikes with no previous experience.

    There really is no reason to wait at this point, other than them being as un-needed as T!t$ on a Bull!

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    It's wide open then hard braking.
    I think my last sentence in post 75 says it all.

    Sorry, no Darwin awards are given here.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  5. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    The issues ARE ironed out.
    But that's the thing. There was always somebody saying that the issues were ironed out by DOS 2.3.

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by HFroller View Post
    But that's the thing. There was always somebody saying that the issues were ironed out by DOS 2.3.
    Current disc brakes are up to Windows 7 Pro level.

  7. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by HFroller View Post
    This discussion reminds me of discussions I heard when personal computers were still young. Somebody had a problem with DOS 2.3. and the reactions were predictable. There always was the equivalent of “For my permanently squealing brakes the fix was 6€ resin pads.”

    (What are you complaining about? The solution is simple! If only you knew what you were doing, man. DOS 2.3. is fine, a huge improvement over DOS 2.1.! If you don’t see that, you’re the problem! You don’t want to go back to mechanical typewriters, do you, dumbo luddite?)

    Not saying personal computers were a bad idea. In the end, even Microsoft programmed a decent operating system. Just saying that for an independent observer, these discussions create the impression that it pays to wait until the issues are ironed out.
    In ten years we will be laughing at those who thought computers were anything short of P'sOS in 2018. I had a Wang with a ten meg hard drive in 1982 and I'm dammed glad I did.

    The world will leave you in the rear view mirror while you're waiting for perfection that never arrives.

    When exactly are they going to get problems with cars sorted out? They're over a hundred years in the development cycle and, while better than 10 years ago, still have a lot of problems.

    Imagine where we'd be if everyone had your view. Without the Model T Ford we never could have moved on to the Model A. Without the Model A, the 2018 Ford Expedition would still be 100 years in the future--at best.

    I suspect you may be among those who have been edu-trinated to recognize the vast corporate conspiracy that kept those bass turds at Ford from making the obvious / direct move from the 1931 model A to the 2018 Expedition?

  8. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    I don't ride my brakes all the way down the hill.

    It's wide open then hard braking.

    No alternative braking for me.
    Thats how I ride. No issues on a Fuji SL with Ultegra disc braking from 50ish mph into sharp corners. Still new but I'm not expecting any issues. I belive the pistons are ceramic which are great at resisting thermal transfer from the pads to the mineral oil.

    My mtb disc need to be trued occasionally which takes 5mins or less.

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fajita Dave View Post
    Thats how I ride. No issues on a Fuji SL with Ultegra disc braking from 50ish mph into sharp corners. Still new but I'm not expecting any issues. I belive the pistons are ceramic which are great at resisting thermal transfer from the pads to the mineral oil.

    My mtb disc need to be trued occasionally which takes 5mins or less.
    my man!

    yep, it's the brake draggers that will have the boiling issues.

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    The world will leave you in the rear view mirror while you're waiting for perfection that never arrives.
    Don't misunderstand me, Swift. I'm not against innovation. But in this case I'm letting others do their innovative duty.

    You're right, perfection never arrives - my rim brakes are very good, but they aren't perfect. Nevertheless, discs with a bit more perfection, without 6€ resin pads to fix permanently squealing brakes, would be nice.
    I’ve been riding rim brakes for 40+ years now, and I’ve never had a permanently squealing brake, now that I think about it.

    And by the way, if a disc rider leaves me in the rear view mirror, it's not because of the discs.


  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    In ten years we will be laughing at those who thought computers were anything short of P'sOS in 2018.
    I guarantee in 2028, software will still have bugs.

    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    When exactly are they going to get problems with cars sorted out? They're over a hundred years in the development cycle and, while better than 10 years ago, still have a lot of problems.
    If you grew up in the 1970s like I did, you would appreciate the reliability of cars today. Back then, most cars were junk at less than 100K miles with many headaches in between. Today, cars that go to 200K are more the norm than the exception.

    Quote Originally Posted by HFroller View Post
    I’ve been riding rim brakes for 40+ years now, and I’ve never had a permanently squealing brake, now that I think about it.
    I have known riders with rim brakes who had plenty of squealing problems. This problem is not unique to disc brakes.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



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