Page 8 of 9 FirstFirst ... 6789 LastLast
Results 176 to 200 of 210

Thread: Pet Road Peeves

  1. #176
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,114
    stoners on bicycles.

  2. #177
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    416
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Or he could be implying that if he is riding his bike legally, the motorist needs to deal with the cyclists legal use of the road, and also obey the law, not tell him to "get off the road" or "ride on the sidewalk" or sumsuch.
    That's a tough one. Sometimes what a cyclist can legally do isn't necessarily the thing one should do from a safety standpoint. Being "dead right" won't be much of a consolation if you end up... dead.

  3. #178
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    4,917
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    And where am I saying that I'm assuming that the motorist will give me a courtesy?

    I stated that I "occasionally" have a thought that "s\he could give me a break", which is nothing but an honest statement of an occasional thought, and not an assumption, on my part, that I will be granted a courtesy.

    I have stated, on different occasions, that I grant the right of way when it's theirs, and take it when it's mine, and in no way Is my having a thought, in some instances, that someone could give me a break change that.

    I am not assuming that I will be granted a courtesy, just agreeing with BlazingPedals that the law is for all to follow "Stick to the written laws and don't get your nose out of joint when someone fails to follow an unofficial rule.", myself included.

    The assumption is yours.
    Your point is well taken. I was just emphasizing the point that we have WAY more to lose than the motorist does. Car vs. Bike. Bike always loses regardless of who is at fault.

    We want to live to cycle another day. Everybody stay safe.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  4. #179
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,851
    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    stoners on bicycles.
    Take it here...

    now that it's mostly legal does anyone burn......
    Too old to ride plastic

  5. #180
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,851
    Quote Originally Posted by cooskull View Post
    That's a tough one. Sometimes what a cyclist can legally do isn't necessarily the thing one should do from a safety standpoint. Being "dead right" won't be much of a consolation if you end up... dead.
    Are you saying that a cyclist should follow the letter of the law only when it's safe to do so, so that a motorist can drive down the road with no regard to the law and how it applies to all road users?

    The safe thing to do is to ride in a predictable smart manner.

    There are many proponents of stop and put your foot down at every stop sign, traffic or not. We will never get the respect of the motorists that resent us being on their road no matter if we continue to stop at the stop signs, as they think we should, and get off the road and out of their way, as they think we should.

    In my world, I yield theirs and take mine, and have relatively few problems with traffic. Sure, not a day goes by that one or a few drivers has an issue with me, but that's a small sampling of a day that could easily see me interacting with 100's of vehicles while riding in traffic.

    And as far as being "dead right", well we're all going to end up dead, and fear of death doesn't change that. The best way to get through the day is to pay attention to your surroundings and follow the rules of the road. Try and communicate with those that treat you with the same respect that they would treat another automobile, with a nod or verbally, while yielding what is theirs and taking what is yours.
    The more predictable we ride, the easier we are for them to understand. The more of them that understand, the easier dealing with traffic becomes. And the easier that dealing with traffic becomes, the sooner it goes from us and them to just the combined Us.

    The answer lies with us, not with them, and that's whether it's looked at over the handlebars or through a windshield..
    Too old to ride plastic

  6. #181
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    416
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Are you saying that a cyclist should follow the letter of the law only when it's safe to do so, so that a motorist can drive down the road with no regard to the law and how it applies to all road users?

    The safe thing to do is to ride in a predictable smart manner.

    There are many proponents of stop and put your foot down at every stop sign, traffic or not. We will never get the respect of the motorists that resent us being on their road no matter if we continue to stop at the stop signs, as they think we should, and get off the road and out of their way, as they think we should.

    In my world, I yield theirs and take mine, and have relatively few problems with traffic. Sure, not a day goes by that one or a few drivers has an issue with me, but that's a small sampling of a day that could easily see me interacting with 100's of vehicles while riding in traffic.

    And as far as being "dead right", well we're all going to end up dead, and fear of death doesn't change that. The best way to get through the day is to pay attention to your surroundings and follow the rules of the road. Try and communicate with those that treat you with the same respect that they would treat another automobile, with a nod or verbally, while yielding what is theirs and taking what is yours.
    The more predictable we ride, the easier we are for them to understand. The more of them that understand, the easier dealing with traffic becomes. And the easier that dealing with traffic becomes, the sooner it goes from us and them to just the combined Us.

    The answer lies with us, not with them, and that's whether it's looked at over the handlebars or through a windshield..
    No that's not what I mean, even though I mostly agree with what you're trying to convey. I'm saying even though a particular behavior maybe legal for a cyclist to do, that it may not be wise- in the sense of self preservation- to do it "just because you can".

    For example, maybe it's legal for a cyclist to ride in the middle of the lane in one's state as long as your not holding up traffic. But would you really want to do that on say a sharp steep climbing blind corner? Your chugging away climbing 5mph in the middle of the lane at the end of the curve while a motorist starts around the beginning of the corner doing 30mph. Even though neither of you are technically breaking the law, there's a very good chance the driver won't see you and brake in time to avoid mowing you down once he rounds that curve. Reassuring yourself that you were "in the right" for a few weeks in the hospital and during months of rehab wouldn't be very consoling to me.

    Conversely, it may be safer to technically break the law than observe it to the letter. Here is a real case in point that I confront almost every day: I need to ride along a certain 4 lane road where traffic is travelling along at 45mph, but unfortunately on one small section the road has zero shoulder and there are railroad tracks at an angle of 30 degrees to the road direction. To ride safely over the tracks you have to ride perpendicular to them which forces you to swing into the middle of the road. Now I could roll the dice that a car going 45mph will slow down for me while I'm zig-zagging down the road negotiating those tracks, but I'd rather just ride the adjacent sidewalk for 50 yards to get around that stretch.

    Yes we will all have a date with the reaper, but I'd like to postpone that date as long as possible even if it means not following the letter of the law.

  7. #182
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,851
    Quote Originally Posted by cooskull View Post
    No that's not what I mean, even though I mostly agree with what you're trying to convey. I'm saying even though a particular behavior maybe legal for a cyclist to do, that it may not be wise- in the sense of self preservation- to do it "just because you can".

    For example, maybe it's legal for a cyclist to ride in the middle of the lane in one's state as long as your not holding up traffic. But would you really want to do that on say a sharp steep climbing blind corner? Your chugging away climbing 5mph in the middle of the lane at the end of the curve while a motorist starts around the beginning of the corner doing 30mph. Even though neither of you are technically breaking the law, there's a very good chance the driver won't see you and brake in time to avoid mowing you down once he rounds that curve. Reassuring yourself that you were "in the right" for a few weeks in the hospital and during months of rehab wouldn't be very consoling to me.

    Conversely, it may be safer to technically break the law than observe it to the letter. Here is a real case in point that I confront almost every day: I need to ride along a certain 4 lane road where traffic is travelling along at 45mph, but unfortunately on one small section the road has zero shoulder and there are railroad tracks at an angle of 30 degrees to the road direction. To ride safely over the tracks you have to ride perpendicular to them which forces you to swing into the middle of the road. Now I could roll the dice that a car going 45mph will slow down for me while I'm zig-zagging down the road negotiating those tracks, but I'd rather just ride the adjacent sidewalk for 50 yards to get around that stretch.

    Yes we will all have a date with the reaper, but I'd like to postpone that date as long as possible even if it means not following the letter of the law.
    Yeah, it does seem that we're both on the same page, ride in a smart, predictable manner.

    On that climb, I wouldn't be in the center of the lane, but in the right tire path of the automotive traffic.
    Too old to ride plastic

  8. #183
    Cycling Addict
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    3,186
    Quote Originally Posted by cooskull View Post
    No that's not what I mean, even though I mostly agree with what you're trying to convey. I'm saying even though a particular behavior maybe legal for a cyclist to do, that it may not be wise- in the sense of self preservation- to do it "just because you can".

    For example, maybe it's legal for a cyclist to ride in the middle of the lane in one's state as long as your not holding up traffic. But would you really want to do that on say a sharp steep climbing blind corner? Your chugging away climbing 5mph in the middle of the lane at the end of the curve while a motorist starts around the beginning of the corner doing 30mph. Even though neither of you are technically breaking the law, there's a very good chance the driver won't see you and brake in time to avoid mowing you down once he rounds that curve. Reassuring yourself that you were "in the right" for a few weeks in the hospital and during months of rehab wouldn't be very consoling to me.

    Conversely, it may be safer to technically break the law than observe it to the letter. Here is a real case in point that I confront almost every day: I need to ride along a certain 4 lane road where traffic is travelling along at 45mph, but unfortunately on one small section the road has zero shoulder and there are railroad tracks at an angle of 30 degrees to the road direction. To ride safely over the tracks you have to ride perpendicular to them which forces you to swing into the middle of the road. Now I could roll the dice that a car going 45mph will slow down for me while I'm zig-zagging down the road negotiating those tracks, but I'd rather just ride the adjacent sidewalk for 50 yards to get around that stretch.

    Yes we will all have a date with the reaper, but I'd like to postpone that date as long as possible even if it means not following the letter of the law.
    You apparently either haven't climbed a lot of twisty mountain roads or have never really thought about the realities of this. In the case of what you are describing you should swing as wide in the corner as is safe (I even go into the oncoming lane in right hand corners where I know no traffic is coming in the opposite direction). This will make you more visible to that car coming up from behind you. If you are hugging the white line in a right hand corner he won't see you until the last possible moment - giving him less time to react. That is the least safe method of climbing a mountain on a bike. Now once you have heard the car getting closer then you can swing over to the right side of the road knowing that he has now seen you and is adjusting his driving as a result.

    In a left hand climbing corner I will be all the way to the right (as much as possible) because I will be seen earlier.

    Now obviously if I hear someone hot rodding up the road behind me I am likely to get off the road because I don't trust that idiot to be able to control his car - but a car coming up at a normal speed will see me wide in the corners first and then moving over to where I feel it is safe for me.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  9. #184
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    4,917
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    There are many proponents of stop and put your foot down at every stop sign, traffic or not.
    This is an extreme interpretation. I don't know of anywhere in writing that a stop isn't a stop unless you unclip and put a foot down - feel free to correct me if I'm wrong. I know the police don't advocate this. I was leading a ride once where a couple of cyclists behind me were stopped and ticketed for blowing a stop sign. The officer said "as long as you slow to a crawl, put your hand down and look both ways, that's good enough for me". He was obviously implying that he wouldn't guarantee that was good enough for a different officer. However, I have never heard of anybody getting a ticket as long as they made the motions of stopping. If you just roll without slowing down, that's blatant disregard for the law. Sort of like the difference between going 70 in a 65mph zone and going 85 in a 65mph zone.

    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    The answer lies with us, not with them, and that's whether it's looked at over the handlebars or through a windshield..
    Exactly!
    Last edited by Lombard; 03-17-2017 at 05:47 AM.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  10. #185
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    807
    I am one of those riders who ride in the right tire track. From a practical point of view, I don't see any difference between this and riding in the center of the lane. For a car to pass me they have to at least partially cross the center line which means they have to deal with oncoming traffic in either case.

    The only real difference is the perception of drivers. They seem more tolerant if they only have to partially cross.

    Being predictable is the best defense when riding. I am glad I don't live where some you live, as the last angry clash with a driver was about 4 years ago

  11. #186
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    2,105
    If u are that scared of riding on the road, stay the hell off of it!
    BANNED

  12. #187
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,851
    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    If u are that scared of riding on the road, stay the hell off of it!
    I ain't afraid.







    I ain't smart enough to be afraid.
    Too old to ride plastic

  13. #188
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    416
    Quote Originally Posted by bradkay View Post
    You apparently either haven't climbed a lot of twisty mountain roads or have never really thought about the realities of this. In the case of what you are describing you should swing as wide in the corner as is safe (I even go into the oncoming lane in right hand corners where I know no traffic is coming in the opposite direction). This will make you more visible to that car coming up from behind you. If you are hugging the white line in a right hand corner he won't see you until the last possible moment - giving him less time to react. That is the least safe method of climbing a mountain on a bike. Now once you have heard the car getting closer then you can swing over to the right side of the road knowing that he has now seen you and is adjusting his driving as a result.

    In a left hand climbing corner I will be all the way to the right (as much as possible) because I will be seen earlier.

    Now obviously if I hear someone hot rodding up the road behind me I am likely to get off the road because I don't trust that idiot to be able to control his car - but a car coming up at a normal speed will see me wide in the corners first and then moving over to where I feel it is safe for me.
    Actually I live at the foot of the rocky mountains in CO and ride these sorts of climbs almost weekly in the summer so I am all to familiar with them.

    True, staying on the left side of the road will make you visible to the driver slightly earlier than riding the left, and for less sharp curves I agree this may be safer. However, for very tight corners in which visibility is very limited regardless of what part of the lane you ride cars going around inevitably drift left (due to inertia) which in my mind makes hugging the white line safer. Also it is easier for a car to veer left (again for physics reasons this is the car's natural tendency) to avoid you if the driver needs to take emergency evasive action because they didn't notice you in time.

    That's my take, to each his own.

  14. #189
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    229
    When the town or county re-paves lots of roads during the summer... but not any roads on my routes.
    Fred-li-ness is not a virtue, it's a way of life.

    Embark on Fredly endeavors.

  15. #190
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,851
    Quote Originally Posted by mann2 View Post
    getting farted at.
    Was riding a tandem with my wife quite a few years ago, and while straining up a hill a fart slipped out and the bike almost stopped moving. I doubled down on my effort to try and regain momentum. Looking down in my effort and I saw my wives feet off the pedals and her legs sticking out on both sides of the bike.

    "Help me" I yelled.

    "If you're gonna fart in my face you're gonna pedal up the hill yourself" she responded.

    My wife don't like getting farted at neither.
    Too old to ride plastic

  16. #191
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    2,105
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Was riding a tandem while straining up a hill....
    I don't see how that is not ever going to happen. Like she doesn't?

    Anyway my #1 peave is people who throw their bike back when they stand, and if your on their wheel trying to recover from your pull, WATCH OUT!
    BANNED

  17. #192
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,831
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    My wife don't like getting farted at neither.
    Well, who does?

  18. #193
    Cycling Addict
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    3,186
    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    Well, who does?
    I've a friend with no sense of smell whatsoever, so he just laughs.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  19. #194
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    4,917
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Was riding a tandem with my wife quite a few years ago, and while straining up a hill a fart slipped out and the bike almost stopped moving. I doubled down on my effort to try and regain momentum. Looking down in my effort and I saw my wives feet off the pedals and her legs sticking out on both sides of the bike.

    "Help me" I yelled.

    "If you're gonna fart in my face you're gonna pedal up the hill yourself" she responded.

    My wife don't like getting farted at neither.
    You need to explain to her that the back pressure helps propel you up the hill.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  20. #195
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,851
    Quote Originally Posted by bradkay View Post
    I've a friend with no sense of smell whatsoever, so he just laughs.
    Man, that's gotta suck.
    Too old to ride plastic

  21. #196
    Cycling Addict
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    3,186
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Man, that's gotta suck.
    He calls it his superpower.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  22. #197
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,851
    Quote Originally Posted by bradkay View Post
    He calls it his superpower.
    Without a sense of smell is he able to taste his food? I've been under the impression that there is no taste without smell.
    Too old to ride plastic

  23. #198
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: JasonB176's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    928
    When drivers hesitate to pass when they have a good line of sight to do so but don't. Then, when it's really not safe to pass, they finally lose their patience and attempt the pass when they shouldn't.
    2012 Motobecane Le Champion Team Titanium
    2002 Jamis Eclipse
    2000 Specialized Allez Elite

  24. #199
    Cycling Addict
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    3,186
    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Without a sense of smell is he able to taste his food? I've been under the impression that there is no taste without smell.
    He tends to like overspiced foods, so there is some taste but it takes a strong spice to make it. I fear that it will catch up to him in his old age.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  25. #200
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,851
    When a driver is so slow that I have to pass while riding my bike.
    Too old to ride plastic

Page 8 of 9 FirstFirst ... 6789 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Cycling - Pet Peeves
    By Duane Behrens in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 165
    Last Post: 06-18-2014, 03:54 AM
  2. Today's mostly trivial pet peeves.
    By charlox5 in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-30-2012, 06:04 PM
  3. Pet Peeves with the language
    By jarbiker in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 82
    Last Post: 06-22-2011, 08:44 AM
  4. TdF pet peeves
    By loudog in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 07-16-2009, 10:17 AM
  5. Top Ten Motorist Related Road Riding Pet Peeves
    By lot8con8 in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: 09-22-2006, 04:30 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •