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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Depends on many factors (quality of tube, storage conditions) but 5 years is certainly not an issue in my experience.
    Yeah, I wouldn't think 5 years to be an issue. 10 years would be a different story.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  2. #52
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    I do not preemptively replace tubes.

    I also do not rotate tires. Once the rear is done I buy new rubber for front and rear.

    I also use this handy feature within Strava called "My Gear" which allows users to add bikes. Along with each bike you can also add components to each bike.

    If I ever wonder how many miles or time a component has I simply look at my gear to determine that (tires, chains, PM battery, brake pads, etc)

    https://support.strava.com/hc/en-us/...ties-on-Strava

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by tka View Post
    I work with a PhD Chemist. His job is to formulate rubber-based elastomer compounds used on several of our products. He is also a serious cyclist. He changes his tires and tubes at least every 3 years. He said his experience with formulating rubber elastomers shows that the inexpensive elastomer compounds used on bicycle tires dry-out enough in 3 years due to typical environmental factors that they should be replaced.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    He must not ride much if he doesn't wear out at least a rear tire in 3 years. I doubt he can cite a single study that might even suggest that a butyl rubber inner tube, mounted on a wheel, will deteriorate in any way in three years. Rubber doesn't "dry out," it oxidizes, and the amount of oxidation taking place inside the tire is miniscule. Your friend is either pulling your leg, trying to lord his expertise, or really doesn't understand what is going on. Ask him which it is.
    Quote Originally Posted by tka View Post
    You don't know the guy but by all means go ahead and attack him.

    I know nothing I say will convince you that he actually knows what he's talking about - a half a billion dollars in sales rides on his work - so I'll just check check out of this discussion.
    H
    Absolutely we will attack him. It's RBR. There's no safe spaces here at RBR for any snowflake.

    That being said everyone's definition of "serious" is different. But with that being said, 3 yrs without wearing out a rear tire seems odd. But with even that being said, Gatorskin hardshells are really painted aluminum painted to look like a tire. They last forever, but ride like crap.

    My final thought is to ride the tires that ride the best for you. I prefer race tires because of their supple feel. I'll take the price, lower millage and durability any day.
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by ziscwg View Post
    Gatorskin hardshells are really painted aluminum painted to look like a tire. They last forever................
    Really last forever? Well, maybe if they don't fail first. I don't even consider these puncture resistant. I've seen these puncture many times to the point of needing replacement - and not even with a lot of miles.

    As far as "riding like crap", running a little lower pressure solves that problem.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  5. #55
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    If the tubes are retired on the same schedule that the helmet gets retired they'll be easier to keep track of.
    Too old to ride plastic

  6. #56
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    Still puncture, but NO FLATS

    Quote Originally Posted by JCavilia View Post
    Nope. Tires wear with use; tubes don't. They don't just give up and develop leaks. I'd bet if you inspect your recent flat to find the cause (did you?) you'll find it was a road hazard (puncture) or pinch flat (can happen from striking a pebble, even if you didn't notice).

    As for that 2011 bike, "lots of use" for six years, and front tire not worn enough to replace? Hmmm. My practice, like many riders, is to move the front to the rear when the rear tire wears, and put the new tire on the front.
    I've been running Stan's NoTubes liquid in my tubes for a few seasons now. Seals punctures instantly with no pressure loss. Check out the YouTube videos. Stuff's amazing.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by bespoke View Post
    I've been running Stan's NoTubes liquid in my tubes for a few seasons now. Seals punctures instantly with no pressure loss. Check out the YouTube videos. Stuff's amazing.
    didn't know it was made to go into tubes.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by bespoke View Post
    I've been running Stan's NoTubes liquid in my tubes for a few seasons now. Seals punctures instantly with no pressure loss. Check out the YouTube videos. Stuff's amazing.
    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    didn't know it was made to go into tubes.
    I heard if you get a bike with disc brakes you never flat anymore.

    On the rim brake rig, I tried this, but it did not hold once you got moving and the tube flexed just a bit in the tire. There might be tube tire combos that this work OK, but you have to be willing to buy the premium tube with the removable core
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by ziscwg View Post
    I heard if you get a bike with disc brakes you never flat anymore.

    I heard if you get a bike with wider tires, your braking improves.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  10. #60
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    didn't know it was made to go into tubes.
    It's not made for tubes, but it works great in tubes if you don't want to deal with the hassle of a tubeless setup (or fixing flats). You need tubes with removable cores (Continentals, for example). Stans sells an injector that screws on to the valve stem. Pour a measured amount into the injector, depress the plunger to put it into your tube, reinstall the valve core (Stans also sells the little valve core removal tool if you need this), pump up and you're good to go. Check out how Stans works: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTlZvOVG8zs

    I have convinced most of my roadie buddies to use this stuff. Who doesn't what to stop getting flats?! Should be called Stan's NoFlats!!

    You probably heard of a product call Slime; green goop that's been around for years that is supposed to do what Stans does. YouTube has some comparisons. Actually, there is no comparison. Stans blows Slime away. Watch the video.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by arai_speed View Post
    I also do not rotate tires. Once the rear is done I buy new rubber for front and rear.
    Just FYI, I rotate the front to the rear, put new rubber on the front, and typically get 3-4K miles out of that back tire. Throw your perfectly good front tire my way and I'll get thousands of miles out of it. If you weigh a front tire when it is new, and weigh it again when your rear tire is worn out, you will find that the front tire has lost approximately zero weight. That means it is not getting worn out, and that's why you'll get all those "free" miles by putting it on the back.

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