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  1. #1
    bm
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    Prescription Glasses

    I found a company that sells prescription glasses and was wondering if anyone out there had comments to contribute, features to recommend, for me when choosing frames and lenses ... for budgetary reasons i'm going to go with a pair of $70 Tifosi frames and dark lenses, and no mirroring.

    What about blue light filters? Is that necessary? Is blue light from sunlight more harmful than from computer monitors and mobile devices?

    What are inserts for? Are those for very high prescriptions? Are they comfortable?

    What are you prescription cyclists wearing?


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  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Bifocal contacts and regular cycling glasses, tinted of course

  3. #3
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    Rudy Project here. Transition lenses. And I use stick on bifocals.

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  4. #4
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    I have been using a couple of sets of Oakley Half Jackets with prescription lenses from LensCrafters for several years. They are fantastic.

    My cycling club gets a discount from Rudy Project, so I'll check out the options there when I'm ready to replace them.

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  5. #5
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    The glasses with inserts... the glasses are one thing, getting a prescription for the inserts is another thing, they are not perscription if you don't use the inserts. I used them for years, they are ok.
    I moved on to polycarbonate prescription sports glasses like for racketball, only a little more open, but they are a lot more $$, but are a lot more durable for all sports, which I use on the bike & moto.
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  6. #6
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    I have 2 pairs of Oakley half jackets (1 grey tint 1 clear) they are pretty good, i use for riding and running. I also have some Oakley racing jackets, vented and transistion, I bought them for raod riding and are excellent, better anti fog than the half jackets and wind protection, but find soemtimes on the mtb in trees ad shadows they arn't as good as my straight tinted half jackets, I can miss some roots and rocks.

    I used to have some bolle's with inserts and they were pretty bad, they would fog up and sweat up really bad. If it wasn't for the tintfor summer, I found my regular glasses were better.
    All the gear and no idea

  7. #7
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    Prescription Glasses

    I have Oakleys prescription glasses (M Frame). Pricey but fantastic!

  8. #8
    xxl
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    I used these guys, years ago, and would happily use them again. As another poster said, the inserts are not as good as having a dedicated set of prescription glasses.

    https://www.zealoptics.com/en/passport-page
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  9. #9
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    Unless I use wrap around style glasses, I get too much buffeting of wind around the glasses. If your just cruising to work or store, don't think it matters much.
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  10. #10
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    One contact lens, half jackets with cheap aftermarket lens. The cheapo lenses seem to hold up better than the Oakley lens.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    Unless I use wrap around style glasses, I get too much buffeting of wind around the glasses..
    This is important if you do a lot of fast descents.

  12. #12
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    Bifocals
    I have progressive bifocals for my regular glasses. But progressive isn't helpful on a bike. I just need a small patch of close vision for the handlebar area, and the rest is distance vision. So my prescription riding insert is single vision distance only, with +2.00 stick-on bifocals, cut way down with a razor knife. They stay on fine, even when rinsing the lenses under the tap.


    Inserts:
    Advantages:
    Swappable lenses. I have polarized and clear lenses and prescription inserts.

    Wraparound lenses. My eyes water a lot on downhills and cold weather. Wraparound glasses made a huge difference. It's hard to do wraparound prescriptions -- the inserts are smaller than the wraparound, so they are easier to make.

    Protection for the prescription. A scratched lens is no big deal -- the expensive prescription layer is still good.

    Disadvantages:
    Two layers. Sweat occasionally gets in between. I get more reflections when riding at night.
    Last edited by rm -rf; 04-22-2017 at 02:22 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rm -rf View Post
    Bifocals
    I have progressive bifocals for my regular glasses. But progressive isn't helpful on a bike. I just need a small patch of close vision for the handlebar area, and the rest is distance vision. So my prescription riding insert is single vision distance only, with +2.00 stick-on bifocals, cut way down with a razor knife. They stay on fine, even when rinsing the lenses under the tap.

    Hmmm, I'll have to try that to see if it works for me. I've taken to carrying a pair of cheap-o reading glasses in my jersey pocket for reading cell phone, roadside repairs, etc. This means, obviously, that I have to stop if I need close-up vision.

    (Current solution: contact lenses and non-prescription cycling glasses, swap cycling glasses with reading glasses when required, as noted above.)

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  14. #14
    JSR
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    I've been using safety glasses with reading-type correction. Available at some hardware stores and pharmacies, they can be found in clear or tinted. They're not very fashionable. They are cheap.

  15. #15
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    Using project Rudy with clip-ins, my prescription is to high. Oakley and Rudy can't make the wrap around lens only
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