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  1. #1
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    Reputation: Kodi Crescent's Avatar
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    Reducing saddle stitch short wear

    I have a saddle that I love, but its heavily stitched (Selle SMP). Rather than replace shorts all the time, I'm looking for some other option to reduce the wear due to the stitching.

    I'm thinking of melting parafin into the stitching to fill the voids and lubricate the surface slightly. Anyone have any other ideas that they've tried that actually work?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kodi Crescent View Post
    I have a saddle that I love, but its heavily stitched (Selle SMP). Rather than replace shorts all the time, I'm looking for some other option to reduce the wear due to the stitching.

    I'm thinking of melting parafin into the stitching to fill the voids and lubricate the surface slightly. Anyone have any other ideas that they've tried that actually work?
    I think the wax would wear away quickly. I have covered scuffs on saddles with quick-set epoxy, spread in a thin layer. It hardens to a slick, tough surface, flexible enough not to crack off, IME. It might work for this purpose.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kodi Crescent View Post
    I have a saddle that I love, but its heavily stitched (Selle SMP). Rather than replace shorts all the time, I'm looking for some other option to reduce the wear due to the stitching.

    I'm thinking of melting parafin into the stitching to fill the voids and lubricate the surface slightly. Anyone have any other ideas that they've tried that actually work?
    It might be difficult with an SMP because of its shape, but a saddle cover would work,...

    There are plenty of thin nylon saddle covers out there...

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  4. #4
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    I use an older, quite heavily stitched SMP Evolution (there's less stitching on the 2012 ones). I cannot say that chafing from the stitching has been a problem, but that can be because I'm skinny and/or my Bergamo bibs can take it.

    However I use shoe cream to keep the leather in good condition, and that might also soften the stitching. However my saddle is black natural leather and I don't know how shoe cream works with the colored lorica ones.
    They do anything just to win a salami in ridiculous races. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me. It was the illest of times, it was the dopest of times. And we looked damn good. Actually the autobus broke down somewhere on the Mortirolo.

  5. #5
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    The 2012s do address this issue, but I can not say to what extent.
    I trashed a few bibs prematurely before I switched out saddles.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mogarbage View Post
    The 2012s do address this issue, but I can not say to what extent.
    I trashed a few bibs prematurely before I switched out saddles.
    I ordered a new 2012 because of this, and the f-ing shop sent me one from 2011 stock. I've got to send it back and hope they fix their f-up.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbwh View Post
    I use an older, quite heavily stitched SMP Evolution (there's less stitching on the 2012 ones). I cannot say that chafing from the stitching has been a problem, but that can be because I'm skinny and/or my Bergamo bibs can take it.

    However I use shoe cream to keep the leather in good condition, and that might also soften the stitching. However my saddle is black natural leather and I don't know how shoe cream works with the colored lorica ones.
    I looked at my summer bibs, and there seems to not be any chafing. The winter ones with the Roubaix fabric tend to pill up where the stitching is.

  8. #8
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    I've had that wear problem and some discomfort problems as well due to embroidered seats. I never tried a fix, just changed out the seat. IMO it's a pretty poor design that deliberately puts, lumpy, abrasive stuff right where you sit for hours at a time. Then too, I have no one but myself to blame for buying it.
    Don't believe everything you think.

  9. #9
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    +1 on this Mr. Versatile - it's not so much about cycling shorts (these wear out eventually anyway) as about comfort. I'd rather ride plastic/rigid saddle than one with stitches on the side. Also I check how sidewalls compress before making a purchase - folded material acts the same way, causes friction and bites where you don't want it.

  10. #10
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    I actually had this problem with SMPs (which I no longer use, just because I could never quite get along with them) and I found a really good solution to it.

    Basically the stitching rubs bobbles on your shorts because parts of the stitch are raised higher than others. My SMP would significantly damage my shorts in just one ride before I worked out this solution.

    To cure it, get a small allen key, and use the curved corner (the outside of the bend in the allen key which makes it an 'L' shape) to press down the stitching. Put your thumb on the inside of the 'corner', and use it to press the curve down. You need to roll the corner of the allen key over the stitching again and again, pressing it HARD. use an allen key that is the same width as the stitching, maybe 3 or 4 mil. You will press the stitching down into the leather, just the tiniest bit, and also you will make the stitches themselves a lot smoother and flatter. Brush your fingers over each area once you are done, and you will notice the subtle difference.

    This works with the unpadded SMPs, so I'm sure would also work with padded ones. Takes about 30mins to do, and then it'll be fine forever. The saddle/stitching looks exactly the same after this, and it won't rub bobbles on your shorts.

    I was really happy to have worked out this solution, as it sucks having a saddle that is otherwise perfect, but ruins your shorts. So thought I ought to share it!!

    Ben

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