Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 26
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    5

    Saddle Recommendation

    Need a comfortable saddle for my road bike, I weigh 150 lbs. and have a small bottom. Any recommendations on a new saddle and where to purchase?

    Thanks,

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: mpre53's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    2,123
    Saddles are really personal to the individual. It's hard for anyone to say what will make anyone's bottom but their own feel better.

    Right now, my bottom is perfectly happy on a $29 Specialized Riva. The stock Affinity on my Madone was an ass hatchet. I found bliss with a ~ $30 saddle. YMMV.

  3. #3
    Cranky Old Bastard
    Reputation: Randy99CL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,589
    Saddle recommendations are mostly useless because it is the one piece that you have to pick on your own. Your a$$ is not like any other.
    First place is to check your local dealer and try as many as you can.

    Specialized dealers have a way of measuring the distance between your sit bones that help decide what width you need.

    Some dealers have "try" saddles that they'll let you borrow to help decide.

    Search on saddles here, go to retail websites to learn about the models, read reviews and try as many as you can.
    Unfortunately, some people have to try a half-dozen or more to find the perfect one.
    "When you know absolutely nothing, anyone who knows 1% more than nothing sounds like an expert."

  4. #4
    banned
    Reputation: Sisophous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    702
    Quote Originally Posted by Randy99CL View Post

    Specialized dealers have a way of measuring the distance between your sit bones that help decide what width you need.
    I wish I knew this before I purchased my saddle. When I purchased my bike a few years ago, I had the bike shop remove the saddle it came with and I bought a gel saddle to replace it. It took time to get used to, but I believe your body adapts to the saddle over time so don't judge too much about comfort the first time you use it. If you can find a shop that does a measurement I would definitely go to one. My bike shop was of no help.

    I would make some phone calls and find a shop that can do the measurement. A saddle that may be comfortable to some may be very uncomfortable to others.

  5. #5
    2 fat 4 cycling
    Reputation: tvJefe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    159
    Measuring your sit bones (plenty of ways to do it at home) is a great place to start. It will tell you what width you are LIKELY to find more comfortable. From there, you just have to try a bunch.

    In my experience, a well-fitted saddle with less cushion is far more comfortable over long distances than a cushy gel saddle.
    More tea, Mr. Bike?

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,990
    OP, I think I have a similar build to you. I've usually done great with stock saddles. Lean guys with narrow hips may be the only people they work for!

    My favorite saddle in current production is the Specialized Avater, in 130 mm (IIRC) and not one of the gel models.

  7. #7
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    149
    Quote Originally Posted by tvJefe View Post
    Measuring your sit bones (plenty of ways to do it at home) is a great place to start. It will tell you what width you are LIKELY to find more comfortable. From there, you just have to try a bunch.
    Absolutely right. It's a great start, but you just have to try out various options. I was measured for a 130mm seat and used one for years on my mountain bike, but was never happy. Now I bought a Specialized Romin Evo Expert in 143mm for my road bike and couldn't be happier. Bought another for my mountainbike as well.

    I really like Specialized seats and they have a number of choices at various price points. Might be worth a look/try.
    Specialized Allez Expert (2013)
    Scott Scale 40 (2006)

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: looigi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    5,984
    Consider the Williams Aurora SLC. They have two widths and I have and use both. The narrow one might work better for you. Flat side to side and front to back which is what works for me out of the many saddles I've tried and used. $130, CF rails and 150gm actual weight.

    Road Bike Saddles, Road Bike Seats - Williams Cycling
    ... 'cuz that's how I roll.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Dave Cutter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1,903
    Quote Originally Posted by Wyville View Post
    .....I was measured for a 130mm seat and used one for years on my mountain bike, but was never happy. Now I bought a Specialized Romin Evo Expert in 143mm for my road bike and couldn't be happier.....
    I think... that might be normal.. or at least common. I think... the measurement taken for me best represented a center-to-center of the sit bones. Where as an edge-to-edge saddle seems more comfortable.

    Although my correct width soft saddle was really OK. My newer slightly wider (although barely padded) saddle is very comfy.
    If I didn't bicycle when the weather is bad... I wouldn't be a cyclist. I'd just be another old fat man... with a bicycle hanging in his garage.

    Urban Cycling.... Overcome your fears (a YouTube Link).
    Learn to cycle in traffic
    Or... just HTFU

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by tvJefe View Post
    Measuring your sit bones (plenty of ways to do it at home) is a great place to start. It will tell you what width you are LIKELY to find more comfortable. From there, you just have to try a bunch.

    In my experience, a well-fitted saddle with less cushion is far more comfortable over long distances than a cushy gel saddle.
    I agree with your last point. The most comfortable saddle I've ridden is my current S-Works Toupe which has virtually no padding.

    In regards to your first point. When I had my bike fit Specialized measured my sit bones and they recommended a wide saddle. Having had a standard size on my previous Specialized bike and not wanting to put a wide saddle on the new aero bike, I went against their advise and I am more than happy with the results.

    I think it goes back to most comments. A saddle is a very personal thing and no one can really recommend one. Others may hate the S-Works Toupe that I really love.

    I also had the Toupe Pro for the first month after buying my bike as they couldn't source the S-Works saddle. This too was a very good saddle and I'd have been more than happy with it apart from the fact that I had set my heart on the S-Works saddle.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: DaveWC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    572
    I moved from an Avatar to a Selle Italia SLR Superflow and love it. The cutout works for me, no pain at all.


  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,014
    What's your price range?
    I ride Selle SMP's.
    My son thought the grass might be greener on another saddle and took a shot at a big race brand to "test" saddle a shot, he wound up taking it back the next day (cost him $14).
    At this point he is looking at Cobb Saddles, they seem to have the most iron clad guarantee I've ever seen.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: octobahn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    295
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBaron View Post
    The most comfortable saddle I've ridden is my current S-Works Toupe which has virtually no padding.
    I rode with a Toupe for years, and I agree that thing has no padding but I was comfortable. In the last few months, I don't know if my backside has just gone soft (heheh) but the Toupe no longer offer the comfort it use to, and I haven't changed any parts or adjust my fit. I'm on a Fi'zik Antares now and it's definitely the one for me (for now). I've just ordered another for my second bike.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: octobahn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    295
    I'm not familiar with Selle Italia saddles and thought this was a Photoshop job when I first saw it.

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveWC View Post
    I moved from an Avatar to a Selle Italia SLR Superflow and love it. The cutout works for me, no pain at all.


  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    996
    Welcome to "the Quest"! No one can answer the question for you. Some LBS have demo saddles. Some online sellers have demo programs. Buying used off Ebay so you can resale and recoupe most of your money. Have fun!
    "The problem with losing your mind is that by the time you realize it's gone, it's too late to get it back."
    Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    19,229
    Quote Originally Posted by mpre53 View Post
    Saddles are really personal to the individual. It's hard for anyone to say what will make anyone's bottom but their own feel better.
    And furthermore, lots of people blame their saddle when it's really a setup problem.

    There are 7 factors in preventing saddle numbness and pain:

    1) saddle adjustment - tilt angle is very important

    2) sitting properly - a lot of people ride too far forward on the saddle. Your "sit bones" should be perched on the rear, wide part of the saddle

    3) standing up - you should never let things go numb or get painful. At the first sign of any lack of feeling or pain, pedal standing up for a short distance and repeat as necessary to bring the feeling back and prevent further numbness

    4) easing up - you want to lift your rear end off the saddle any time you are going to hit a bump or sharp edge. It's easier on your anatomy, your wheels, your tires, and the rest of your bike.

    5) bike fit: in addition to saddle height and tilt, there is fore/aft adjustment, reach and drop to the bars, and cleat position.

    6) tires: proper width with the right PSI for your weight and roads so you don't feel every single road imperfection.

    7) saddle - there are some people who can ride most any saddle if it is properly adjusted (see #1) and there are some people who have problems with nearly any saddle. It's hard to predict which type you are. Work on 1-6 and if that doesn't help, THEN consider a new saddle.

    When choosing a new saddle, width is important but so are a number of other things and it really is not possible to recommend a saddle that works based on width alone. The shape of the saddle butt, width of the nose, thickness and density of padding, etc. all factor in.

    The standard advice to cure numbness is to tip the nose down, but having discussed this topic many times, it seems that some people do not sit properly on their saddles. You need to have a saddle and saddle position that has your sit bones on the butt of the saddle. If your saddle nose is tipped down too far, it may cause you to slide forward. If it is tipped up too far, it may be causing pressure. And if you can't get things right in between these points, it may be that you are not sitting in the right spot or that the saddle doesn't fit you. In my experience, the range of saddle tilt goes from "nose level" to saddle level. Nose level means that for most saddles, the butt of the saddle is slightly elevated (this is how I ride). Saddle level means that a level placed on the saddle would have the nose and butt level, which may create a hammock effect in the middle. If your saddle is "flat" and doesn't have a raised butt relative to the nose, then the "level" concept applies to the entire length of the saddle, not just the nose. Your personal comfort has to rule on where to place things in this range. Also, fore/aft position can influence comfort - it is a trade-off between pedaling style and the how much you lean on the bars vs. sit on the saddle.

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,154
    Quote Originally Posted by Schneiderguy View Post
    Welcome to "the Quest"! No one can answer the question for you. Some LBS have demo saddles. Some online sellers have demo programs. Buying used off Ebay so you can resale and recoupe most of your money. Have fun!
    Schneiderguy wins the blue ribbon for the best advice in the thread (with due respect to those who have offered useful tips and techniques).

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    147
    A lot of good advice here, but as someone who irritated his prostate using a traditional saddle, i.e. without a cutout, I have a somewhat different perspective. It's not just about comfort but about avoiding injury. I bought a bike and was professionally fitted. The saddle that came with the bike, a Fizik Arione, felt comfortable to me. Then one night after a ride I couldn't urinate without a lot of pain. The doctor said I had irritated my prostate and that there were traces of blood in my urine. It took me months to fully recover. I realize that plenty of cyclists are fine with a traditional saddle; I'm not saying everyone needs a cutout. But I think it makes sense to try a saddle with a cutout first -- I don't see any downside to it. I use a Specialized Romin Evo and love it.

  19. #19
    Carbon Fiber = Explode!
    Reputation: CleavesF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,248
    Brooks works for all.
    '09 Voodoo Wazoo
    '08 Pedal Force RS2
    '06 Raleigh Cadent 5.0
    '01 Trek 4300 MTB
    '93 Norco Nitro MTB Touring
    '88 Schwinn Prelude Fixie
    1 hour of running = 1 hour of wasted time when you could have been riding. - Alaska Mike

  20. #20
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: MrMook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    366
    Quote Originally Posted by CleavesF View Post
    Brooks works for all.
    Except weight weenies and fashion snobs. And vegans.

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    149
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Cutter View Post
    I think... that might be normal.. or at least common. I think... the measurement taken for me best represented a center-to-center of the sit bones. Where as an edge-to-edge saddle seems more comfortable.

    Although my correct width soft saddle was really OK. My newer slightly wider (although barely padded) saddle is very comfy.
    I think so too. I buy my gear at a small store where I've been coming for years and the mechanic who measured me warned me that most people prefer a slightly wider seat. Of course at the time I didn't listen because the 130mm seat was "lighter". (That was at a time where I had a very short-lived obsession with weight.)
    Specialized Allez Expert (2013)
    Scott Scale 40 (2006)

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    19,229
    Quote Originally Posted by CleavesF View Post
    Brooks works for all.
    A little story to point out that your statement is nonsense. I had two riding buddies, one with a Brooks and one with a conventional saddle. They were constantly complaining to each other about their saddles and one day decided to swap. Both were in heaven after the swap. It is patently ridiculous to claim that any one saddle will work for everyone.

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    3
    I read the crazyguyonabike blog and discovered the Carbon Comfort bike seat by RideOut Technologies. Bought one and totally love it. I have doubled my distance!! I broke 80 miles and going for 100. RideOutTech.com

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Trek2.3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,076
    Looks funny but works great. Comes with 60-day money back guarantee.
    I have over 10,000 miles on my Moonsaddles.

    moonsaddle.com

  25. #25
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Rich Gibson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    110
    My stock Trek FX 7.6 was uncomfortable. I bought a Bontrager for my 120mm butt (188#). It's okay, but I settled on Selle SMP TRK. Like Goldilocks it's "just right!" You can get them between $50-$60 on the internet. Mine was from FSI cycles through an Amazon ad $57.57.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. saddle recommendation? koobi ?
    By Donn12 in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-07-2012, 03:05 PM
  2. saddle recommendation
    By robertburns3 in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 10-14-2007, 06:28 AM
  3. Saddle Recommendation for a Big Guy
    By SH0ck-D in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 04-02-2007, 01:26 PM
  4. Flat Saddle Recommendation
    By sigepf94 in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-22-2004, 07:18 AM
  5. Saddle recommendation
    By oldschool in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-07-2004, 01:37 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Hot Deals

Contest

Tour De France

Latest RoadBike Articles


Latest Videos

RoadbikeReview on Facebook