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  1. #1
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    Selle SMP Strike Saddles

    Hello,

    I've been looking at the SMP strike saddles and was wondering if anyone has any opinion on them. The two models I've been considering are the PRO and the Evolution. I have not seen either one of these in person as my LBS does not carry this brand. So before I order one from someplace I wanted to hear what people have to say about them both.

    Thanks

    RC

  2. #2
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    A buddy of mine when I was living in Italy was a bike shop owner (good friend to have!) and he was looking into carrying SMP saddles while I was there, so he had samples of each model that he was trying out. I got to take a ride on the Pro model (the Evolution is pretty damn narrow, IMO). I found it to be surprisingly comfortable given its shape; it's very well padded around the cutout, and if you stay in the "sweet spot" position, with you sit bones on the back of the saddle, it's really pretty good. That said, you can't move around much in the saddle, and forget about getting on the nose for climbing. I was a bit bothered by the thinness of the support around the nose of the saddle; that is, the whole nose is just a thin band of support, and that chafed a bit after a long time in the saddle.

    Bottom line: Not a bad seat, and could be considered if you ahve specific problems related to your tender bits. That said, it's heavy and expensive; I really prefer my trusty Flite in the end, and I've never had any problems with numbness. And as with all saddles, YMMV!!!

  3. #3
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    I took a test ride on a bike fitted with one. It was like sitting on a very short pair of railroad tracks. I wasn't impressed.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Americano_a_Roma
    ...... I got to take a ride on the Pro model (the Evolution is pretty damn narrow, IMO). I found it to be surprisingly comfortable given its shape; it's very well padded around the cutout, and if you stay in the "sweet spot" position, with you sit bones on the back of the saddle, it's really pretty good. ......

    Bottom line: Not a bad seat, and could be considered if you ahve specific problems related to your tender bits. That said, it's heavy and expensive; I really prefer my trusty Flite in the end, and I've never had any problems with numbness. And as with all saddles, YMMV!!!
    Is the evolution narrower at the back? Looking at the pictures it looks the Pro is a little shorter and the evolution doesn't have as much of a bend at the front...is that correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei Roida
    I took a test ride on a bike fitted with one. It was like sitting on a very short pair of railroad tracks. I wasn't impressed.
    Which model did you test?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by rayclark
    Is the evolution narrower at the back? Looking at the pictures it looks the Pro is a little shorter and the evolution doesn't have as much of a bend at the front...is that correct?
    The evolution is about an inch narrower across the rear of the saddle at the widest point; that's pretty significant, and it looked to me like the Evolution would be appropriate only for smaller riders. The Evolution is actually shorter than the pro; the SMP website gves dimensions as Pro:278x148 mm, Evolution: 266x129 mm. Again, I'd say that unless you are fairly small, the Pro is the way to go. Out of curiosity, why are you prepared to drop so much cash on this saddle sight unseen? I don't know what specific physiological issues you might have, but I'd steer you toward a Selle Italia Flite Gel Flow, which is way cheaper, similar weight, and you could probably find at your LBS and try before you buy. My main objection to the SMP is that if you get yourself positioned just so over the cutout, it's pretty comfy, but if you move just a little, all those edges and holes and corners start hitting you in just the wrong places.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Americano_a_Roma
    The evolution is about an inch narrower across the rear of the saddle at the widest point; that's pretty significant, and it looked to me like the Evolution would be appropriate only for smaller riders. The Evolution is actually shorter than the pro; the SMP website gves dimensions as Pro:278x148 mm, Evolution: 266x129 mm. Again, I'd say that unless you are fairly small, the Pro is the way to go. Out of curiosity, why are you prepared to drop so much cash on this saddle sight unseen? I don't know what specific physiological issues you might have, but I'd steer you toward a Selle Italia Flite Gel Flow, which is way cheaper, similar weight, and you could probably find at your LBS and try before you buy. My main objection to the SMP is that if you get yourself positioned just so over the cutout, it's pretty comfy, but if you move just a little, all those edges and holes and corners start hitting you in just the wrong places.
    Thank you the info you have provided. It is very usefull in helping me make a choice. You ask why I'm repared to drop that kind of cash sight unseen....on the saddles I have tried so far I have had big issues with them causing me numbness. I have read that this saddle was designed to help eliminate those issues. I currently have a Fizik Aliante which is a great saddle but after about 45 minutes I can't feel anything down there. If this saddle would prevent that condition, then $200 is nothing. I will definitly look into the other one that you have suggested, as I have not taken a look at that particular model. If you can suggest any other saddle that I should consider, that would be great.

    Thanks

    RC

  7. #7
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    I have tried several of the saddles with cutouts. In each case the saddle felt fine initially and then became swaybacked within a few months.

    Jim
    Jim Purdy - Mansfield, TX

  8. #8
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    1) Have you REALLY worked on the tilt of your saddle? I think that a high-quality saddle like the Aliante will fit 9 out of 10 riders acceptably (maybe not be the BEST, but acceptably) if the tilt and position is dialed in. Look into getting a good two-bolt seatpost if you don't have one already; I find that the tilt adjustment is hit-and-miss with the toothed single-bolt adjustment systems. Ride at least an hour after each adjustment (unless you're in excrutiating pain) before you change again.
    2) Every butt is different, but there are a few saddles out there that seem to satisfy a majority of those that try them. Have you tried a Flite, SLR or SLK? Those are all available with cutouts, too... It's not that the SMP wouldn't work for you, maybe it would, but I'd encourage you to try something from the LBS, with an eye to something you could exchange if it doesn't work for you. Good luck!

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