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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    Having been mashed by a car once already, I tend to avoid mingling with them as much as possible.

    I've sort of naturally (not so much as a conscious, intentional process) changed my riding habits to minimize my exposure.

    * I take MUT's when I can - my commute is 16 miles one way - 15.5 miles of it is on a paved MUT.

    * My Adventure Rides tend to be off of paved roads. "Gravel" or whatever you want to call it - most of my planned long weekend rides involve this.

    * I try to ride in a large group if I'm riding on roads with minimal shoulders, high speed vehicles, and sketchy site lines. Organized group rides, charity rides, fondos, etc..

    * I rarely ride among cars at night, or in bad weather (rain, etc...).

    * I live in suburbia these day - and used to love to ride into the city and explore - but no more - it's just too crazy dangerous to ride there. I head further out of town as much as possible.
    Amen. This is where I am 100%. Too much craziness going on out there. Oregon was great though, I felt like I could ride almost anywhere. Atlanta is not. Lots of cool reasons to live here, but cycling with traffic is not one of them.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  2. #52
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    To take it back on topic (sorry to rain on the off-topic parade), starting in May, the State of Michigan will increase speed limits on several non-highway corridors, in accordance to the 85% law:
    http://www.michigan.gov/documents/md...p_558274_7.pdf

    The orange lines are interstates and highways are increasing to 75mph, which IMO, will only open the gate to people going 90, 95, or even 100mph (the current speed limit is 70mph, and traffic regularly goes 85 to 90). The blue lines are state or county roads, which were at 55...already sketchy for bike riding, but increasing the speed limit to 65 opens that door to 75 to 80mph. Terrible for anyone riding a bike along those routes!

    The absolute best thing for traffic control in general is actual traffic control! If we had traffic police actually policing traffic in a proactive manner (as opposed to letting traffic policing occur only during downtime), we as cyclists would be a lot more protected, not to mention, traffic would flow much smoother.
    I lost my phone number. Can I have yours?

  3. #53
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    Parades are lame anyway

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Dude, what the heck are you talking about? I didn't ride through the parade, I went around it. The parade was going south and I went north to go around the tail end of it. I did not impact the parade or the spectators or infringe on anyones enjoyment.
    i would have been tempted to pick up the candies and thrown them back at the little punks.

    maybe logic would have won the day, and i just flipped them the bird.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    The trick is to ride in the mountains where cell phones don't work and there are no taverns. If the roads contain hairpin turns and cliffs, the substance abusers are either eliminated early or know better than to travel.

    Narrow roads are best because drivers are forced to be prepared to deal with other cars and obstacles.

    Take your cycling vacation in the alps (preferably Italy) where nearly everybody drives stick shift and the roads are constant hair pins. There is not time to be distracted between turns / constant shifting / cyclists / and wanting to pass or be passed.

    In the US, stay out of cities that are magnets for substance abusers. Also, stay away from universities where many of the drivers are too stupid to realize that texting / driving / drinking is a bad combination.

    With the above advice you will likely reduce the odds of being hit by a car by 75%.
    A guy that used to manage a local bike shop here got ran off of the road in the North GA mountains from what I hear. He's now paralyzed I believe. Skilled and experienced rider. It can be dangerous up there too.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  6. #56
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    Welcome to my world. Ever get a fire extinguisher to the face?

    Cyclist awarded almost $300K after biking incident in North Georgia | Talk of the Town
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  7. #57
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    Riding your bike on the road is one of the safest things you can do....The death rate for anyone on a bike is 2.1 people per Million .....The death rate in Motor Vehicles is 106 per million. More people die tripping in their home (not LSD), or while having sex, than are killed while riding.
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    You originally wrote the candy pelting continued from "float to float" as you "road past" (spelling errors in original). Either your original story was wrong or you are now changing it.
    Sorry for the spelling, but, as I rode south while the parade went north, I was riding past the parade. I got to the tail end of the parade and went around it to continue on my way.

    I didn't change anything, but be sure and let me know what needs correcting or you don't like in this post.
    Too old to ride plastic

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by MR_GRUMPY View Post
    More people die tripping in their home (not LSD), or while having sex, than are killed while riding.
    Was David Carradine considered to be having sex?
    Too old to ride plastic

  10. #60
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    It depends.
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
    .
    How would you like it if Hitler killed you
    Dogbert.

    I>U

    Buying parts to hang on your bike is always easier than getting fit.

    If you feel wimpy and weak, get out and train more, ya wee lassie!

    If Jesus had a gun, he'd be alive today!

  11. #61
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    Last week, we had some nice weather and the local rag printed a big front page pic of a small group of riders in a pace line on one of our nice country roads. Of course next day there was a letter to the editor asking how the paper could condone risky, unsafe, and illegal (?) behavior. It included a few quotes without citation to support the illegal claim.

    Even though I'm a laissez faire kind of guy, I couldn't let that go and I wrote a response, refuting (with citations) his claim that bike riding on public roads is illegal as well as a few comments along the lines of "it's risky for everyone, there's room for everyone, let's all share and be safe".

    Of course the paper chose not to publish.

    Anyway I generally feel safer riding on these roads than I do walking the 4 blocks to my grocery store. That being said I ride with cameras now so my wife knows who to sue when they scrape me up off the pavement.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by MR_GRUMPY View Post
    It depends.
    Could you expand on that?
    Too old to ride plastic

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by MR_GRUMPY View Post
    Riding your bike on the road is one of the safest things you can do....The death rate for anyone on a bike is 2.1 people per Million .....The death rate in Motor Vehicles is 106 per million. More people die tripping in their home (not LSD), or while having sex, than are killed while riding.
    True indeed. I fully understand how people have different comfort levels with riding on the roads. But riding on the right roads and/or at the right times is relatively safe.

    IMO, I think it's a bad thing to "give in" and allow roads to get constructed that are unfriendly to cyclists, or perpetuate that cyclists need to be segregated from cars. Surveys have certainly shown that having dedicated bike paths is the 1st choice, but it is simply impractical to have a full alternative transportation system for cyclists. That is why I think it is important to continue the good work that has already been done to create traffic laws that do allow cyclists on the roads with continued advocacy for sharing the roads.

    I've attended city council meetings on multiple occasions and voiced the need for transportation planning that promotes bicycle use not just for recreation, but also for transportation. It's too easy for city planners to construct bike paths that dead-end nowhere and design for roads for autos only such that they create barriers for safe cycling routes that span many different communities.

    I always say to them that having roads that cycling-friendly is a good thing in general for your community. Do you really want high-speed highways that are non-pedestrian and non-cycling friendly to divide up your community, just in the interest of allowing people to drive cars faster? No!

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearDaddy View Post
    True indeed. I fully understand how people have different comfort levels with riding on the roads. But riding on the right roads and/or at the right times is relatively safe.

    IMO, I think it's a bad thing to "give in" and allow roads to get constructed that are unfriendly to cyclists, or perpetuate that cyclists need to be segregated from cars. Surveys have certainly shown that having dedicated bike paths is the 1st choice, but it is simply impractical to have a full alternative transportation system for cyclists. That is why I think it is important to continue the good work that has already been done to create traffic laws that do allow cyclists on the roads with continued advocacy for sharing the roads.

    I've attended city council meetings on multiple occasions and voiced the need for transportation planning that promotes bicycle use not just for recreation, but also for transportation. It's too easy for city planners to construct bike paths that dead-end nowhere and design for roads for autos only such that they create barriers for safe cycling routes that span many different communities.

    I always say to them that having roads that cycling-friendly is a good thing in general for your community. Do you really want high-speed highways that are non-pedestrian and non-cycling friendly to divide up your community, just in the interest of allowing people to drive cars faster? No!
    Ha Ha! Just posted today concerning "bicycle advocate" in my fair city...

    Meet The Robocop Of Twin Cities Cycling Advocacy WCCO | CBS Minnesota

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearDaddy View Post
    Ha Ha! Just posted today concerning "bicycle advocate" in my fair city...

    Meet The Robocop Of Twin Cities Cycling Advocacy WCCO | CBS Minnesota
    I understand his frustration, but I highly recommend that he really spends some time thinking about whether those confrontations are worth it:

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/wsbtv.r...ged-/138259439

    Police: Hit-and-run driver hit bicyclist, dragged him 50 ft. | WSB-TV
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by GearDaddy View Post
    Ha Ha! Just posted today concerning "bicycle advocate" in my fair city...

    Meet The Robocop Of Twin Cities Cycling Advocacy WCCO | CBS Minnesota
    I can't believe this guy has been hit from behind so many times! I've ridden in city traffic for 35 years and have never been hit from behind by a car, only once, a riding buddy who wasn't paying attention. So this guy "takes the lane" so he's visible. I ride in the right tire track of the lane and drivers see me just fine, apparently.

    A video perused recently on cycling in traffic noted the Dutch are going at a leisurely pace, 10-12 mph, while Americans "race" as fast as they can.

    I used to do that. Pedestrians and motorists wouldn't see me until I was right on them, and I had too many close calls, so discovered actually slowing down was safer, providing you leave some room for cars to pass. If you can't keep up with traffic, don't "take the lane," IMO. Get the hell over so cars won't run into you. And when a car parks in the bike lane, just ease past it on the left. Driver will see you in his left rear view mirror as he's checking for cars before pulling out into traffic.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by MR_GRUMPY View Post
    Riding your bike on the road is one of the safest things you can do....The death rate for anyone on a bike is 2.1 people per Million .....The death rate in Motor Vehicles is 106 per million. More people die tripping in their home (not LSD), or while having sex, than are killed while riding.
    by your logic wingsuit proximity base jumping is immeasurably safer than cycling or automobiles, even commercial air travel, because so few people killed doing it. Death rate one per billion per year. Though only a couple dozen people actually do this sport.
    Last edited by BCSaltchucker; 3 Weeks Ago at 04:15 PM.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by MR_GRUMPY View Post
    Riding your bike on the road is one of the safest things you can do....The death rate for anyone on a bike is 2.1 people per Million .....The death rate in Motor Vehicles is 106 per million. More people die tripping in their home (not LSD), or while having sex, than are killed while riding.
    Of the many people I'm acquaintances with, I can't think of one person who I have known that has been killed in a car accident. I do, however, know of two close cycling friends that were killed by being struck by a car. I know the statistics speak volumes to a lot of people, but it really is dependent on your location.

  19. #69
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    Like Fredrico, I ride in the right tire track. However I consider this taking the lane. If I am in the right tire track, a passing car will have their right tire in the left track, and their left tire across the lane marker. A passing vehicle cannot pass and stay entirely in the same lane with me

    Perhaps your area uses wider lanes, or just a difference in definitions

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herbie View Post
    Like Fredrico, I ride in the right tire track. However I consider this taking the lane. If I am in the right tire track, a passing car will have their right tire in the left track, and their left tire across the lane marker. A passing vehicle cannot pass and stay entirely in the same lane with me

    Perhaps your area uses wider lanes, or just a difference in definitions
    You're assuming the driver see's you.

    My situation, the driver looked right at me. She told the officer she didn't see me. It was broad daylight, and I had a flashing front and rear light, and was wearing a high-viz jersey.

    I believe the OP stated that he believes the driver that hit him never saw him.

    Taking the lane isn't going to help if you just get mowed over. Think about it. Full sized cars and trucks get rear ended all the time. That happens to you, the result isn't going to be good.

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herbie View Post
    Like Fredrico, I ride in the right tire track. However I consider this taking the lane. If I am in the right tire track, a passing car will have their right tire in the left track, and their left tire across the lane marker. A passing vehicle cannot pass and stay entirely in the same lane with me

    Perhaps your area uses wider lanes, or just a difference in definitions
    You're right! Riding in the right tire track IS taking half the lane! On most city streets cars can squeeze by without going over the line too far and its only for a few seconds. And I get over if I think the way is clear and signal, "Go ahead! Pass!" The situation happens once a year. The rest of the time, traffic has no difficultly passing a little over the line. Big deal.

    My feeling is a rider on a bike is more visible if he isn't right next to the parked cars. Riding in the right tire track adds perspective and he's more noticeable.

  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herbie View Post
    Like Fredrico, I ride in the right tire track. However I consider this taking the lane. If I am in the right tire track, a passing car will have their right tire in the left track, and their left tire across the lane marker. A passing vehicle cannot pass and stay entirely in the same lane with me
    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    My feeling is a rider on a bike is more visible if he isn't right next to the parked cars. Riding in the right tire track adds perspective and he's more noticeable.
    Count me as another who rides in the right tire track.

    More visible, less chance to be crowded off the road or into the curb and room to maneuver if someone does crowd you. And as an added benefit, fewer flats because the automotive traffic has swept the path clean with their larger tires.
    Too old to ride plastic

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Migen21 View Post
    You're assuming the driver see's you.

    My situation, the driver looked right at me. She told the officer she didn't see me. It was broad daylight, and I had a flashing front and rear light, and was wearing a high-viz jersey.

    I believe the OP stated that he believes the driver that hit him never saw him.

    Taking the lane isn't going to help if you just get mowed over. Think about it. Full sized cars and trucks get rear ended all the time. That happens to you, the result isn't going to be good.
    I assume that the drivers can see me, but I ride as though I'm invisible.

    Nothing is going to help if we just get mowed over, but hugging the curb\fog line is just inviting the automobile traffic to crowd us off the road or sideswipe us.
    At least when a driver is pissed that I'm using so much of his road and buzzes me, I know that he see's me, unlike being buzzed while hugging the side of the road and not knowing if the driver even knows that I'm there.

    Riding in traffic can be intimidating and hair raising but I firmly believe that more drivers give us a fair shake than don't and that helps me ride in traffic. I say this, with conviction, because I ride with a camera and on my #1 the camera is hung on the saddle rails facing the rear. Before deleting any footage I give it a quick review looking for anything that stands out in my memory of the ride, and during these reviews I have seen that most drivers allow me plenty of room. They slow and don't tailgate, waiting till it's safe and pass me at a respectful distance.

    Yes, there are bungholes, but IMHO there aren't as many as our memories lead us to believe. Yes, they are out there, but their close passes are more memorable than the many more safe passes that we experience every ride.

    At least that's my experience in my neck or the woods.
    Too old to ride plastic

  24. #74
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    Veoldog's experience is the same as mine. You cannot eliminate all risk, but there are studies that show drivers pay most attention to what is directly in their path, and the rest tends to be overlooked

  25. #75
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    For those that prefer to ride in the right tire track, what level of traffic are you riding in? City, where there is a constant flow of traffic? Or lightly traveled backroads where you may see 2-3 cars an hour?

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