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  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cartoscro View Post
    For those that prefer to ride in the right tire track, what level of traffic are you riding in? City, where there is a constant flow of traffic? Or lightly traveled backroads where you may see 2-3 cars an hour?
    I take the lane when I ride the bike, traffic or not. I think that it's probably more important to take the lane in an urban or high traffic area than when there is little traffic.
    If a driver doesn't see the cyclist s/he should ought to be able to see the traffic slowing and passing the cyclist.
    Too old to ride plastic

  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cartoscro View Post
    For those that prefer to ride in the right tire track, what level of traffic are you riding in? City, where there is a constant flow of traffic? Or lightly traveled backroads where you may see 2-3 cars an hour?
    I do it all the time. You never know when a car will come up behind you, so it's best to always be in a lane position that discourages unsafe passing.

    About 11 years ago a British study found that motorists passed cyclists more closely if they wore helmets, yet when the same cyclists wore no helmet and female wigs they were passed with more room. The author speculated this is because cyclists who appear to be more experienced don't need as much room. That being said, I experimented with this premise myself and found similar results. I didn't wear a wig, but when I knew people were behind me I would twitch my handlebars to give the appearance that I briefly lost my balance or control of the bike. Every time I did that I'd get a much wider pass than if I stayed completely straight.



    The study: British Study on Passing Clearance and Helmets
    Ghurarmu shirkush’ agh azgushu. Zant ya apakurizak. Gűl-n’ anakhizak.

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by SauronHimself View Post
    I do it all the time. You never know when a car will come up behind you, so it's best to always be in a lane position that discourages unsafe passing.

    About 11 years ago a British study found that motorists passed cyclists more closely if they wore helmets, yet when the same cyclists wore no helmet and female wigs they were passed with more room. The author speculated this is because cyclists who appear to be more experienced don't need as much room. That being said, I experimented with this premise myself and found similar results. I didn't wear a wig, but when I knew people were behind me I would twitch my handlebars to give the appearance that I briefly lost my balance or control of the bike. Every time I did that I'd get a much wider pass than if I stayed completely straight.



    The study: British Study on Passing Clearance and Helmets
    As a transgender rider, I find that my own experiences have paralleled that study. After transition I find that drivers give me more room on the road than the bad old days as my former self - except for one group of drivers. Obese women drivers seem to give no more room than before. I can almost hear them saying "Get out of my way you skinny b****!"

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by kimoly View Post
    Obese women drivers seem to give no more room than before.

    They need all the room they can get. Hashtag #fatspreading.
    Ghurarmu shirkush’ agh azgushu. Zant ya apakurizak. Gűl-n’ anakhizak.

  5. #80
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    I think this is a better/more effective approach than robocyclist's:

    https://www.google.com/amp/www.velon...ice_437651/amp

    There's also this:

    Froome hit by car on training ride | Cyclingnews.com

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I take the lane when I ride the bike, traffic or not. I think that it's probably more important to take the lane in an urban or high traffic area than when there is little traffic.
    If a driver doesn't see the cyclist s/he should ought to be able to see the traffic slowing and passing the cyclist.
    my approach on the busy rural road I live on which has no shoulder - I take a bit more of the lane as the cars approach from behind. Then just as they get close I move to the white line. So the cars are pushed out a bit more, and I widen the space more after they've committed to crossing the centreline a bit.

    Came across Ryder Hesjedal training a few times around here. He was a true 'take the lane' cyclist. kudos to him for that. (But now he has been given his own street Ryder Hesjedal Way, LOL a street near my house.)

  7. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    my approach on the busy rural road I live on which has no shoulder - I take a bit more of the lane as the cars approach from behind. Then just as they get close I move to the white line. So the cars are pushed out a bit more, and I widen the space more after they've committed to crossing the centreline a bit.

    Came across Ryder Hesjedal training a few times around here. He was a true 'take the lane' cyclist. kudos to him for that. (But now he has been given his own street Ryder Hesjedal Way, LOL a street near my house.)
    Yeah, that works most of the time. Cars slow behind you to make sure there's no oncoming traffic and then straddle a bit further over the center line. You get over to the right as they pass; they don't hit you and thank you for giving them the room.

    There could be a problem if the car is approaching fast enough doesn't have enough time to react as you move further into their way. You can't wait too long to make your blocking maneuver, if they've already chosen their line and you're going to get in their way.

    I prefer to hold my line steady in the right tire track, so they're assured I'm not going to get in their way. I can still get over another foot or two as they pass.

  8. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmach View Post
    Who came first? The bike or the car?
    Roads were not built for cars. In fact, when cars started using roads there was a lot uproar and resistance because, among other things, cars were very dangerous.
    “Man may trust man, Prince Elric, but perhaps we'll never have a truly sane world until men learn to trust mankind. That would mean the death of magic, I think.”

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tschai View Post
    Roads were not built for cars. In fact, when cars started using roads there was a lot uproar and resistance because, among other things, cars were very dangerous.
    That might have been true a 100 years ago, but let's face it, modern roads were built for cars. Occasionally they make some provisions for bicycles, but usually not

  10. #85
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    When I can ride at similar speeds and reach the same destinations on "bike paths" as on roads, I'll use them. Until then (which will be a loooooong time if ever), I'll be using the roads to which I have just as much right and and pay just as much to build and maintain. 99% of bike paths or MUTs are terrible, crowded, death traps (from other users, where they cross roads, too narrow, etc.). I make a very notable exception for The Loop in Tucson.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    When I can ride at similar speeds and reach the same destinations on "bike paths" as on roads, I'll use them. Until then (which will be a loooooong time if ever), I'll be using the roads to which I have just as much right and and pay just as much to build and maintain. 99% of bike paths or MUTs are terrible, crowded, death traps (from other users, where they cross roads, too narrow, etc.). I make a very notable exception for The Loop in Tucson.
    horses are allowed ??

    horses and bikcycles don't play well.

  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    When I can ride at similar speeds and reach the same destinations on "bike paths" as on roads, I'll use them. Until then (which will be a loooooong time if ever), I'll be using the roads to which I have just as much right and and pay just as much to build and maintain. 99% of bike paths or MUTs are terrible, crowded, death traps (from other users, where they cross roads, too narrow, etc.). I make a very notable exception for The Loop in Tucson.
    It's a shame your trails suck. For me, as long as I stay out of the parks and city centers, the rail trails and commuter bike paths are great, especially during commute time.

    Also, I don't prioritize speed over safety. But in my case, I don't have to. My ride to work is 15.5 miles on an uninterrupted rail trail. It's effectively a shortcut that takes me about an hour. If I tried to ride to work on city streets, it would be a lot further and take a lot longer, going through a lot of intersections and riding in heavy (fast) traffic with no shoulders.

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