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  1. #101
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    Well done with the quit. I quit on November 2011 and saved over $2000 in one year and bought me a dream bike (to my standars). Quiting is the best decision for the rest of your life, congratulations.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frankuota View Post
    Well done with the quit. I quit on November 2011 and saved over $2000 in one year and bought me a dream bike (to my standars). Quiting is the best decision for the rest of your life, congratulations.
    Thank you sir......Well done and keep it up. Personally, I am extremely excited at it is 7 weeks now!!!!!

    In Australia, smokes are approx $17-19 per packet. I used to smoke 1 packet per day + more on weekends.... Me now saveth $7,000 a year if I keep it up......

    And not to mention the most important bit.....after 7 weeks, I am soooo much faster on LE PELO!!!!!!! I was happy with my speed, endurance, and climbing abilities....now I am soooooo much happier....way beyond the results of "normal training" gains....

    Again, thank you for your encouragement...

    And anyone else who comes across this post and is thinking of stopping??? You can do it!!!! There is heaps of support out there if you are serious about this.......

    I may even change my name from TheSlug74 to TheRabbit74???? Naaaahhh, probably not.....
    2 wheels good, 4 wheels bad - George Orwell

  3. #103
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    Hey man - Iím a passionate commuter and pleasure cyclist and want to get into racing. I log about 50-100 miles a week sometimes more. Iím wondering if you quit cold turkey and did you gain weight? I am skinny now and fast on the bike and self conscious about weight so this is something that concerns me.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by kipfromnightrider View Post
    Hey man - Iím a passionate commuter and pleasure cyclist and want to get into racing. I log about 50-100 miles a week sometimes more. Iím wondering if you quit cold turkey and did you gain weight? I am skinny now and fast on the bike and self conscious about weight so this is something that concerns me.
    op hasn't posted in 5 years but the answer is in the thread.
    Last edited by factory feel; 06-05-2018 at 03:39 PM.

  5. #105
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    I usually limit myself to a small bowl before riding. I rode one day this week without, about the same ridewise.
    BANNED

  6. #106
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    back years ago, my best friend quit cold turkey, used the money saved to buy his dream car, Nissan GTR...

    on the other hand, my SIL decided this year at 30 years old, the best thing to do was to take up smoking... and she is smashing that goal.
    All the gear and no idea

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    I usually limit myself to a small bowl before riding.
    i do that on occasion as well. sometimes it simply gives me motivation to ride when i'm not feeling quite up to it.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    i do that on occasion as well. sometimes it simply gives me motivation to ride when i'm not feeling quite up to it.
    Heck, it's once given me the motivation to sweep all the gravel out of the intersection in front of my house.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by dir-t View Post
    Heck, it's once given me the motivation to sweep all the gravel out of the intersection in front of my house.
    i know! I don't understand the "lazy" stereotype. i often feel the need to busy myself with something, like overhaul a bb, go for a ride, cook, or play my guitar.

    re: smoking cigarettes and cycling ... i saw a bunch of folks doing these two things at the same time when i was in amsterdam.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    i know! I don't understand the "lazy" stereotype. i often feel the need to busy myself with something, like overhaul a bb, go for a ride, cook, or play my guitar.
    Same here. There's a reason I have the nicest yard and fence in my neighborhood.

    My non-smoking friend once asked me, "is that your hyper and annoying weed or your relaxed, mellow, fun to be around weed?".

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by dir-t View Post
    Same here. There's a reason I have the nicest yard and fence in my neighborhood.
    oh, yeah! i even start pulling the neighbor's dandelions!
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    op hasn't posted in 5 years but the answer is in the thread.
    Short answer:

    Giving up the evil nicotine will be a beotch. You will gain weight. Riding improves when you get your wind back.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    I usually limit myself to a small bowl before riding. I rode one day this week without, about the same ridewise.
    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    i do that on occasion as well. sometimes it simply gives me motivation to ride when i'm not feeling quite up to it.
    Wouldn't that be considered doping? Name:  Emoticon-Think.gif
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  14. #114
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    Just have to say, I don't get the smoking cigarette thing. I am looking after my elderly Mom now who needs oxygen who smoked into her 50's and she also played tennis with limited wind into her 60's. She now has pretty severe COPD and needs oxygen to go grocery shopping. I get the recreational marijuana thing...like having an occasional drink...but not cigarettes every day or booze or marijuana every day either.

    I hate cigarettes and have pretty strong disdain for those that invade my space with them. I know perfectly fine people that smoked. One of best buddies died young from it. I hate cigarette smoke and don't get people that put that $h!t in their body everyday diminishing their quality of life while trying to live. How different, we as a humanity are. Some train for triathlons in an effort to maximize their lung capacity and others squander it away stupidly shortening their life but moveover, quality of life while they are here...for what?...a filthy habit of inhaling toxins? Crack makes more sense...lol. Something simply like climbing a flight of stairs affected by a choice. That's all.
    Last edited by 11spd; 06-08-2018 at 11:27 AM.

  15. #115
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    I believe the improvements will depend on how long and how much you smoked versus how long since the cessation. It's probably not straight line either if one measured the improvement over say 1-2 years.

    Echo the sentiments over the stupidity of the habit. I've followed the acting career of Leonard Nimoy over the years and he lost significant lung function later in life to the point he couldn't breathe without oxygen assist and eventually died as a result.

  16. #116
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    I quit smoking and drinking, but still suck on the bike hopefully I'll get better with time. Though tbh i definitely feel better overall after quitting smoking, looking back it's so disgusting!!

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Just have to say, I don't get the smoking cigarette thing. I am looking after my elderly Mom now who needs oxygen who smoked into her 50's and she also played tennis with limited wind into her 60's. She now has pretty severe COPD and needs oxygen to go grocery shopping. I get the recreational marijuana thing...like having an occasional drink...but not cigarettes every day or booze or marijuana every day either.

    I hate cigarettes and have pretty strong disdain for those that invade my space with them. I know perfectly fine people that smoked. One of best buddies died young from it. I hate cigarette smoke and don't get people that put that $h!t in their body everyday diminishing their quality of life while trying to live. How different, we as a humanity are. Some train for triathlons in an effort to maximize their lung capacity and others squander it away stupidly shortening their life but moveover, quality of life while they are here...for what?...a filthy habit of inhaling toxins? Crack makes more sense...lol. Something simply like climbing a flight of stairs affected by a choice. That's all.
    But it looks so cool, right?

  18. #118
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    Quitting smoking is the best decision I ever made

  19. #119
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    7 days smoke free - the improvements are extreme and noticeable

  20. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Just have to say, I don't get the smoking cigarette thing. I am looking after my elderly Mom now who needs oxygen who smoked into her 50's and she also played tennis with limited wind into her 60's. She now has pretty severe COPD and needs oxygen to go grocery shopping. I get the recreational marijuana thing...like having an occasional drink...but not cigarettes every day or booze or marijuana every day either.

    I hate cigarettes and have pretty strong disdain for those that invade my space with them. I know perfectly fine people that smoked. One of best buddies died young from it. I hate cigarette smoke and don't get people that put that $h!t in their body everyday diminishing their quality of life while trying to live. How different, we as a humanity are. Some train for triathlons in an effort to maximize their lung capacity and others squander it away stupidly shortening their life but moveover, quality of life while they are here...for what?...a filthy habit of inhaling toxins? Crack makes more sense...lol. Something simply like climbing a flight of stairs affected by a choice. That's all.
    Your point is well taken about cigarette and other tobacco smoking. I have never been a smoker and only tried it a couple of times in college. It never did anything for me other than make my eyes water and my throat scratchy.

    However, having had friends who were smokers and even died from smoking related diseases, I don't begrudge people who smoke. I don't particularly like their smoke in my space, but I sort of understand where they are. It is a very powerful addiction more powerful than alcohol and many recreational drugs. I've seen people with lung cancer, COPD, CHF all suffer while still puffing. It is also a fallback for many recovering/recovered alcoholics. In the grand scheme of things, alcoholism is more debilitating and ultimately fatal than tobacco smoking.

    I also believe certain people are hardwired to be susceptible or not to addictions. Many people who quit an addiction soon find another one. It also manifests itself in other parts of a person's life like the ability to live within one's means. It's not a "weakness", it's just who they are.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    ďStatistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.Ē -- Aaron Levenstein



  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Your point is well taken about cigarette and other tobacco smoking. I have never been a smoker and only tried it a couple of times in college. It never did anything for me other than make my eyes water and my throat scratchy.

    However, having had friends who were smokers and even died from smoking related diseases, I don't begrudge people who smoke. I don't particularly like their smoke in my space, but I sort of understand where they are. It is a very powerful addiction more powerful than alcohol and many recreational drugs. I've seen people with lung cancer, COPD, CHF all suffer while still puffing. It is also a fallback for many recovering/recovered alcoholics. In the grand scheme of things, alcoholism is more debilitating and ultimately fatal than tobacco smoking.

    I also believe certain people are hardwired to be susceptible or not to addictions. Many people who quit an addiction soon find another one. It also manifests itself in other parts of a person's life like the ability to live within one's means. It's not a "weakness", it's just who they are.
    It may be "who they are" but it is a weakness.

    If one is powerless over addiction, "who they are", it takes great strength to overcome the addiction. And whether addiction is defeated or steered towards something that is less harmful to ones self or loved ones, it is still a matter of great strength.

    If one is weak, they are as good as lost, but with strength there is hope.
    Too old to ride plastic

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Just have to say, I don't get the smoking cigarette thing. I am looking after my elderly Mom now who needs oxygen who smoked into her 50's and she also played tennis with limited wind into her 60's. She now has pretty severe COPD and needs oxygen to go grocery shopping. I get the recreational marijuana thing...like having an occasional drink...but not cigarettes every day or booze or marijuana every day either.

    I hate cigarettes and have pretty strong disdain for those that invade my space with them. I know perfectly fine people that smoked. One of best buddies died young from it. I hate cigarette smoke and don't get people that put that $h!t in their body everyday diminishing their quality of life while trying to live. How different, we as a humanity are. Some train for triathlons in an effort to maximize their lung capacity and others squander it away stupidly shortening their life but moveover, quality of life while they are here...for what?...a filthy habit of inhaling toxins? Crack makes more sense...lol. Something simply like climbing a flight of stairs affected by a choice. That's all.
    Back in the day, people were told and believed cigarettes were refreshing and good for you.
    By the time consumers found out through Congress and the Surgeon Generals report it was too late, they were hooked.

    I remember as a 7 year old seeing the surgeon generals warning and wondering what is was, it stood out and seemed odd for a kid my age to be able to grasp what it was all about.

    I remember asking my parents what does that mean?

    It's something that has stuck in my mind for 50 years.

    Luckily, I've never smoked a cigarette because I have an addictive personality and would have been unable to stop.

    Try to look at your mothers situation in that way and it will be easier too have empathy and understanding.

    Good luck to her.


    Lung cancer was once a very rare disease, so rare that doctors took special notice when confronted with a case, thinking it a once-in-a-lifetime oddity. Mechanisation and mass marketing towards the end of the 19th century popularised the cigarette habit, however, causing a global lung cancer epidemic. Cigarettes were recognised as the cause of the epidemic in the 1940s and 1950s, with the confluence of studies from epidemiology, animal experiments, cellular pathology and chemical analytics. Cigarette manufacturers disputed this evidence, as part of an orchestrated conspiracy to salvage cigarette sales. Propagandising the public proved successful, judging from secret tobacco industry measurements of the impact of denialist propaganda. As late as 1960 only one-third of all US doctors believed that the case against cigarettes had been established. The cigarette is the deadliest artefact in the history of human civilisation. Cigarettes cause about 1 lung cancer death per 3 or 4 million smoked, which explains why the scale of the epidemic is so large today. Cigarettes cause about 1.5 million deaths from lung cancer per year, a number that will rise to nearly 2 million per year by the 2020s or 2030s, even if consumption rates decline in the interim. Part of the ease of cigarette manufacturing stems from the ubiquity of high-speed cigarette making machines, which crank out 20 000 cigarettes per min. Cigarette makers make about a penny in profit for every cigarette sold, which means that the value of a life to a cigarette maker is about US$10 000.

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    Back in the day, people were told and believed cigarettes were refreshing and good for you. By the time consumers found out through Congress and the Surgeon Generals report it was too late, they were hooked.
    Sorry, I don't intend to be insensitive, however, the politically correct excuse listed above is just pure bull puckey.. Smoking was cool in our parents days and everyone knew it was bad for their health, everyone!!!

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by n2deep View Post
    Sorry, I don't intend to be insensitive, however, the politically correct excuse listed above is just pure bull puckey.. Smoking was cool in our parents days and everyone knew it was bad for their health, everyone!!!
    I agree. The generation that truly did not know smoking was bad has long past. We have had warnings on cigarette packs since 1965. I don't find it credible that anyone starting smoking today is not 100% aware the cigarettes are bad for you. Still people start smoking everyday. Perhaps at a young age they feel invincible or they believe they can easily quit later.

  25. #125
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    My local bike club turned 50 last year, and they posted a whole bunch of pictures of rides from back in 1967. Of course the pics showed a lot of old 'heavyweight' bikes along with the better road bikes and mid-weight British uprights of the time. nobody was wearing 'kit' in the modern sense, and a lot of kids joined the ride. how much things have changed....

    Probably the shot that told you just how much times had changed was one shot of the mid-ride break, where several riders were having a cigarette!
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

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