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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Spoke Protector Question

    Are they really necessary? I have bikes both with and without. I have never encountered a problem with the chain hitting the spokes. I am putting together a bike with some very nice wheels and am trying to decide what to do. I guess the only downside is the additional weight.

  2. #2
    POGUE MAHONE
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    If your DR is adjusted properly they have no purpose, snip snip, lighten the load.
    My kickstand is busted.

  3. #3
    Moderatus Puisne
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    You don't need 'em.

    Snip? Just take off the cassette and slide it off, rather than risk mangling stuff...

  4. #4
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Quote Originally Posted by 123prs
    Are they really necessary? I have bikes both with and without. I have never encountered a problem with the chain hitting the spokes. I am putting together a bike with some very nice wheels and am trying to decide what to do. I guess the only downside is the additional weight.

    The weight is negligible. If it isn't causing problems or making noise, I'd just leave it there. Mine got all yellow and dried out from the sun and eventually just cracked and I carefully extracted it off the wheel with no tugging or extra effort. If you ride without it, just pay a little more attention when you first get on your bike each time you ride.

    When you first get on to ride, go through a small checklist: skewers closed and wheels locked into position, tires at proper pressure, nothing "loose." Then get on the bike, take the gears up and down the back cassette in all the positions of the front chain ring, try the brakes, make certain they are working OK too. Then, enjoy your ride. I've gotten so I can accomplish the moving check in one or two revolutions of the cul-de-sac I live in. If you follow this, and your DR isn't adjusted properly and falls into the crack between the cassette and the spokes, you won't be moving fast enough to cause much damage and can stop fast enough to mitigate any serious damage (hopefully). Plus, you'll be close enough to home to your tools and stand and other items to make the necessary tweaks.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Reflectors, spoke protector and any post clear coat decals are the first things to go before I ever pedal a new bike.

  6. #6
    Banned forever.....or not
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    Are pocket protectors necessary?
    For some people maybe.
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
    .
    How would you like it if Hitler killed you
    Dogbert.

    I>U

    Buying parts to hang on your bike is always easier than getting fit.

    If you feel wimpy and weak, get out and train more, ya wee lassie!

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  7. #7
    gnauss
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    I'm really surprised the no one came right out and mentioned the dork factor. We should really come up with a list of dork factor stuff to help out the general population.

    1. Spoke protector
    2. Yellow jersey
    3. reflectors
    4. toe straps

    These were just off the top of my head. Feel free to add more and rank them accordingly.

  8. #8
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    Yeah...sure...Spoke Protector = "Dork".

    Having said that, I had to relace Paula's rear wheel a few years back because of her bike not having one. Chain jumped off and nicked the crap out of most of the spokes. I didn't think it was a problem until she popped a spoke on 3 out of next 4 rides!

    Talk about getting a rash of...well, you know...STINKY stuff!

  9. #9
    For Rent
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    Quote Originally Posted by gnauss
    I'm really surprised the no one came right out and mentioned the dork factor. We should really come up with a list of dork factor stuff to help out the general population.

    1. Spoke protector
    2. Yellow jersey
    3. reflectors
    4. toe straps

    These were just off the top of my head. Feel free to add more and rank them accordingly.
    I happen to have 2 bikes with toe straps, an old DeRosa Primato and a Raleigh single speed. I guess I'm a dork

    They have their purpose, like cycling without cycling shoes, or becuase like on the DeRosa it was made before clipless pedals were intoduced. But yeah, I wouldn't have them on a newer bike.

  10. #10
    The Dropped 1
    Reputation: allison's Avatar
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    I don't have spoke protectors or wheel reflectors, but I do have a neon yellow jersey. And a Postal yellow jersey.

    Never hurts to be more visible with the crazy So Cal drivers

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by allison
    Never hurts to be more visible with the crazy So Cal drivers
    Judging from the "Road Rage" thread...it seems all you're doing is giving them a better target!

  12. #12
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    I guess I am a dork... I have reflectors and toe clips on my single speed.

  13. #13
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    I guess I am one as well. I wear a reflective jersey, I have my front and rear lights on during the day, and I wear a helmet.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crank-a-Roo
    I guess I am a dork... I have reflectors and toe clips on my single speed.
    Dork or not you will eventually regret leaving reflectors on you bike. There is a very serious reason to remove SPOKE reflectors. If one comes lose (think front wheel) and gets stuck between spokes and fork while your crusing along, within a second you are in crisis management mode and doing all you can to avoid a face plant. Saw a guy riding across a college campus one day with not a care in the world, next think I see is him tumbling down a hill side (lucky for him it was grass), what happened reflector came loose and fliped the bike on him. Get rid of them and get a vest.

    steppy

  15. #15
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    Nothing wrong with keeping the spoke deflector on. Nothing with taking it off. As mentioned already, a properly aligned drivetrain will never need it. IMO, if you're a worrier, keep it, otherwise, get rid of it. Unless you're a don't carer, like me, and are to lazy to worry about one way or another.
    p.s. and for all you SS freaks out there...ya' know, some people want to go faster than what gravity allows when going downhill. I'm just sayin'....

    To bad carbon bikes don't have the same abilities as our carbon based bodies....namely, the ability to regenerate after an accident.

    Even logic must eventually give way to understanding

  16. #16
    Bickety bam!
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    Proper bike maintenance...

    Quote Originally Posted by DM-SC
    Yeah...sure...Spoke Protector = "Dork".

    Having said that, I had to relace Paula's rear wheel a few years back because of her bike not having one. Chain jumped off and nicked the crap out of most of the spokes. I didn't think it was a problem until she popped a spoke on 3 out of next 4 rides!

    Talk about getting a rash of...well, you know...STINKY stuff!
    Proper maintenance and adjustment of the rear derailleur is why you don't need a spoke protector. If your derailleur is adjusted correctly, you have absolutely nothing to worry about, but in your case, looks as though you didn't have it dialed in properly. If it happens once, fix it. If it happens 3 out of the next 4 times, as you said, that's just silly. Get a book, learn how to set the limit screws. It isn't too hard, and will save you tons of money (as in, not needing to get a new wheel everytime you or someone else you knows rides their bike).

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    I got this one answered for me just a bit ago.

    Dork disk: yes or no?

    I ended up going at mine with a pair of wire cutters. (I didn't have a chain whip, so It was too difficult to take off the cassette)

    I figure they make the bike look kinda like it's from Walmart. The only time the chain comes off is when your in the biggest cog, meaning you'll probably be going slow enough to stop before it causes too much damage anyways.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by DM-SC
    Yeah...sure...Spoke Protector = "Dork".

    Having said that, I had to relace Paula's rear wheel a few years back because of her bike not having one.
    What we need is a spoke protector that looks cool. Like a bashguard. My 11-year-old son needed something to keep his pants out of his chain. I could've bought him one of those dorky-looking plastic rings. Instead I made him the proud owner of a Raceface bashguard. It looks way-cool on his bike, and he's thrilled. Chain guard / bash guard. Spoke protector / ???.

  19. #19
    I don't exist
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    Toss the protector
    but do wear a yellow Jersey.

    Nothing wrong with being seen by cagers v/s being hit 'cuz they "didn't see you".
    Rocket Sturgeon
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    in KY jelly

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by magnolialover
    Proper maintenance and adjustment of the rear derailleur is why you don't need a spoke protector. If your derailleur is adjusted correctly, you have absolutely nothing to worry about, but in your case, looks as though you didn't have it dialed in properly.
    You are right but what happens if your bike tips over and falls on the drive side? Accidents happen and I'm not sure many people check the derailleur alignment after an incident.

  21. #21
    Potatoes
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    Hmmm, I prefer my bikes without. But I also know how to tune and maintain my bike.

    Leave it on if:
    • You don't know how to tune derailleurs
    • You don't get your bike serviced regularly


    The only time I'd ever leave on the spoke protector/bell/reflectors is on a commuter. But even then, I sub reflectors for powerful lights and reflective tape on my frame... bell- just use your voice... spoke-protector- SS!

  22. #22
    mad scientist
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    Quote Originally Posted by gnauss
    We should really come up with a list of dork factor stuff to help out the general population.

    2. Yellow jersey
    A bright jersey is smart and not particularly dorky, imo. In any event, I'd rather be a living dork than cool road kill.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by 123prs
    Are they really necessary? I have bikes both with and without. I have never encountered a problem with the chain hitting the spokes. I am putting together a bike with some very nice wheels and am trying to decide what to do. I guess the only downside is the additional weight.
    The point is not to protect the spokes from poor derailleur adjustment--it's to protect the spokes from getting the derailleur pushed into them while you are riding.

    I leave mine on, or put one on if one ain't there.
    I hit hit the rear derailleur on something once and bit it mainly because the rear derailleur went into the spokes. Does that sound necessary? It weighs just about nothing and doesn't cost much. The only problem I find with them is that the clear-plastic ones tend to degrade from sunlight, so solid colors are better if you can find them.
    ?
    Maybe I should make a carbon fiber/kevlar spoke protector.....
    ~
    Last edited by Doug8002; 07-26-2007 at 04:49 AM. Reason: sspeelign erorrs!

  24. #24
    gnauss
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    I should be more clear on this.

    Quote Originally Posted by reklar
    A bright jersey is smart and not particularly dorky, imo. In any event, I'd rather be a living dork than cool road kill.
    Wearing A yellow jersey is okay. Wearing THE yellow jersey (you know the one from the Tour) = dork. Don't get me wrong, I've lived through some serious dork factor moments myself but I think I've graduated into quite the bike snob. I still waive at other riders but I'm trying to work on that.

  25. #25
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    I would leave it on a tourning bike or a commuter, just because on tour a bunch of chewed up spokes is going to be a massive pain, and I have a habit of not taking great care of my commuter.

    On a road bike...not so much...not on my mountain bike either, they seem to get jarred loose on my mtb.

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