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  1. #1
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    Switching from Speedplay to ??????

    Many, many years ago my first road bike pedal had 0 float and I didn't like it so I switched to Speedplays and haven't tried anything since. They have always served me well except when you get crud in the cleat and then they're a pain but a quick scraping and you're good to go.

    With how much things have changed in the last twenty years I'm wondering if it's still the best pedal for me. Has anyone changed away from Speedplays and been overjoyed with a new brand? I know it's very subjective so I'm just shopping for some opinions, what did you switch to and what do you like about the new brand and style over Speedplay? I'm not worried about cost so let's keep that out of it.

    Thanks
    Miles of agony for moments of ahhh!

  2. #2
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    I am interested in this also but for the opposite reason.
    I have been using Look Keos and have been happy with them.
    I like float and Keos have a decent amount of float.
    Seems that Speedplays might be better in this respect.
    Also seems all the top pros are using them but not sure why.
    I have heard about hot spots with Speedplay but maybe this is not a problem with carbon soled shoes.

  3. #3
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    I ride SPD-SL

    but I always wondered about those Lollypops. My friend Ted swears by them on his Cervello.
    I'm no expert by any means because I went from Rat-Traps to SPD-SL. Got them pretty much mastered but I have fallen over three times.

    Obviously you like the Speedplay's and I'd like to know what are their features.

    Hank

  4. #4
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    I chose look because they almost can function as a platform and I had a half mile ride to school everyday.

    I think if I did it again I would choise speedplay. They just look easier. Just step on the pedal rather then the whole catch your toes loop on the correct side of the pedal then slide forward and push down with looks. Not that the looks are so difficult, speed play just looks easier.

  5. #5
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    The main reason I have stayed with Speed PLay is it actually gives you greater contact serface than the triangle plactic styles. The foot stack height is also a few millimeters lower than other brands letting your seat be slightly lower as well.

    Don't forget to lube them with chain lube. They should feel like your skating on ice. The little plastic shims can also be used for shoes that have a lot of curve to the toe.

  6. #6
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    I went from Speedplays to Look Blade. i did because of hot spots, though i was using them with Specialized S works shoes. so, the carbon sole did not help the hot spots with the speedplays.
    Look Blade pedals have a wider platform and more contact area than the regular Keo pedals. i am not sure they have more contact area than the SpeedPlays, but, they work better for me.
    i do not even miss the dual entry feature.

    just my 2 cents.
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  7. #7
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    I like Time RXS (haven't tried the IClic, probably won't until something happens to the pedals I have). You can pedal them with regular shoes for a short while if you like. They have a reasonable amount of float without self-centering, you can adjust the Q-factor to a degree, and they hang properly so I rarely step down on the wrong side. Also important to me, the cleats are walkable (so you don't have to carry covers to avoid falling or scratching floors), they require no maintenance, are tolerant of dirt, and don't require complicated setup. The pedal/cleat combination is also light and relatively inexpensive.

  8. #8
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    Keywin! Truly large platform, great pivot action and very inexpensive.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by scryan View Post
    I think if I did it again I would choise speedplay. They just look easier. Just step on the pedal rather then the whole catch your toes loop on the correct side of the pedal then slide forward and push down with looks. Not that the looks are so difficult, speed play just looks easier.
    This has been my only bit of aggravation with the LOOK Keo pedals ... And the primary reason I try to avoid stopping at traffic lights; once I have to put my foot down, I know I'm going to have some trouble getting back in in a rush. More often than not, once the light changes, I can't get in quick enough, always miss the click, and my foot slips off at least a couple times before I get my act together. And I'm usually in the middle of an intersection when it happens. Ugh!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wood Devil View Post
    This has been my only bit of aggravation with the LOOK Keo pedals ... And the primary reason I try to avoid stopping at traffic lights; once I have to put my foot down, I know I'm going to have some trouble getting back in in a rush. More often than not, once the light changes, I can't get in quick enough, always miss the click, and my foot slips off at least a couple times before I get my act together. And I'm usually in the middle of an intersection when it happens. Ugh!
    This was my reason for switching from many years of Look and Shimano pedals to Speedplays. The double sided aspect of Speedplay makes for a more consistent entry after lights and stop signs even though the force needed to click in is higher than on my old Ultegras. But after a couple of seasons on the Speedplays I'm happy.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by veloci1 View Post
    I went from Speedplays to Look Blade. i did because of hot spots, though i was using them with Specialized S works shoes. so, the carbon sole did not help the hot spots with the speedplays.
    Look Blade pedals have a wider platform and more contact area than the regular Keo pedals. i am not sure they have more contact area than the SpeedPlays, but, they work better for me.
    i do not even miss the dual entry feature.

    just my 2 cents.
    Aside: That seems to suggest that the speedplay's weren't directly the problem of your hotspot. More often than not, that's a question about cleat fore-aft placement or foot width relative to shoe size. It can be a problem of position if a too-far forward placement leads to a subconscious 'clawing' with the toes while pedaling, leading to a rubbing in the joints that causes 'hotfoot.'

    That said, Speedplays don't always go back far enough to help with hotspots, where that is part of the problem. But, they make a metal backing / extender plate that both allows the cleats to be mounted further back, and also stiffens the whole shebang, solving the problems of both weak shoes and the 'warped' cleats from overtightning that can lead to tough entry exit. Plus, they are lighter than the plastic piece they replace. Ought to be a standard item, IMO.
    A good habit is as hard to break as a bad one..

  12. #12
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    I have gone from SPD-SL to SP, to Look Keo, to SP, to Look Blade and now back on Speedplay for GOOD!

    If Speedplay's have been good for you, why switch? I left for the same reason as you. Getting crud here and there in my cleats, even with covers was a slight pain. But, I went back and I am sticking with SP, because I feel, they are hands down, the best pedals on the market. Especially if you like adjustability they offer and ease of use.

    Pros:

    1. Dual sided-ed entry. As fast as I can get in Look/SPD-SL pedals, SP are easier and even fast entry.
    2. Float, float, float. Any way you like it, SP Zero's offer the best range and adjustability of any pedal.
    3. More fore and aft and L/R adjustments than others, with the metal adapter plates.
    4. Easiest and best pedals to shim if you have leg length issues.
    5. Overall cleat/pedals platform size. Only the Blade gives to this much platform size.

    Cons:

    1. Cleats cost more to replace
    2. Issues with dirt in the cleats
    3. Over-tighting or lack or torque issues can lead to cleat issues.
    4. Speedplay as a company can be jerks on the legal side.

    Again, I will take any of the minor cons at this point over any other pedal system for ME. Dual entry and float of the Zero's is the main thing for me. I out a lot of clip-ess newbies on the LA Speedplay pedals and they love them!
    DIRT BOY

    "Pain is a big fat creature riding on your back. The farther you pedal, the heavier he feels. The harder you push, the tighter he squeezes your chest. The steeper the climb, the deeper he digs his jagged, sharp claws into your muscles." - Scott Martin


  13. #13
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    Speedplays or nothing at all, speedplays are by far the best pedal on the market

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wood Devil View Post
    This has been my only bit of aggravation with the LOOK Keo pedals ... And the primary reason I try to avoid stopping at traffic lights; once I have to put my foot down, I know I'm going to have some trouble getting back in in a rush. More often than not, once the light changes, I can't get in quick enough, always miss the click, and my foot slips off at least a couple times before I get my act together. And I'm usually in the middle of an intersection when it happens. Ugh!
    this is funny, because after almost 20 years on shimano "look" ultegra peddles and a year on my SP, I still feel awkward clicking in. Catching my cleat on that loop is so second nature, I still find myself trying to do it. plus, I don't really feel or hear a solid "CLICK" when the SP engages, and several times have found out 2-3 strokes later, I was not clicked it...

    Overall, I do like my Speed plays. I read that if I switch to the "Zero" cleat instead of my "L-A" cleat, it may engage more solidly.
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  15. #15
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    I went from Look Keo to Speedplay Zero a year ago.
    Had to use SPD-SL on a test recently and found it difficult to click in on a trainer...
    They do anything just to win a salami in ridiculous races. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me. It was the illest of times, it was the dopest of times. And we looked damn good. Actually the autobus broke down somewhere on the Mortirolo.

  16. #16
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    Happy SPD-SL user for years.

    I've been on bike tours/rides where there is always some walking around at muddy rest stops. The Speedplay users are screwed.

    Also would argue about difference in "contact area" but either way, I'll bet you would never notice a difference on a blind test of however many miles you want to ride.

    Having a mm or two difference in the stack height is also more of a "so what?" to me. Can't imagine that small an amount would make any real measurable difference. Unless you can also feel a pea placed under your mattress as you sleep.

  17. #17
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    It looks like the majority of users stick with Speedplays so I'll do the same, since I have them on 3 bikes it's certainly makes sense to stay with them. I was just curious about other systems out there, it's just been so many years since I tried anything different.

    Thanks
    Cooper
    Miles of agony for moments of ahhh!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeWMass View Post
    I like Time RXS (haven't tried the IClic, probably won't until something happens to the pedals I have). You can pedal them with regular shoes for a short while if you like. They have a reasonable amount of float without self-centering, you can adjust the Q-factor to a degree, and they hang properly so I rarely step down on the wrong side. Also important to me, the cleats are walkable (so you don't have to carry covers to avoid falling or scratching floors), they require no maintenance, are tolerant of dirt, and don't require complicated setup. The pedal/cleat combination is also light and relatively inexpensive.
    +1. I've been using RXS pedals for a few years now and ditto all the above. I also want to mention that the float is distinctly different than the Look/Shimano style. It is more of a rotating with the axis around the middle of the cleat (the brass part) rather than swiveling with the axis at the front of the cleat. I like it better, and think speedplay users might think the same and appreciate the more walkable, more care free cleats.

  19. #19
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    I switched from using Looks, to Speedplay X2 long, long ago, and only recently switched to the Speedplay zero, which I feel, is an improvement for me. The Zero has a firmer spring, and the amount of float is more controllable. I found that I would occasionally rub the frame with my heel using the X2 pedals, so I have limited the amount of float I have in that direction with the Zero's.

    I've tried other pedal brands, but prefer the Speedplays over all the others.


  20. #20
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    Go with some look pedals.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRT BOY View Post
    I have gone from SPD-SL to SP, to Look Keo, to SP, to Look Blade and now back on Speedplay for GOOD!

    If Speedplay's have been good for you, why switch? I left for the same reason as you. Getting crud here and there in my cleats, even with covers was a slight pain. But, I went back and I am sticking with SP, because I feel, they are hands down, the best pedals on the market. Especially if you like adjustability they offer and ease of use.

    Pros:

    1. Dual sided-ed entry. As fast as I can get in Look/SPD-SL pedals, SP are easier and even fast entry.
    2. Float, float, float. Any way you like it, SP Zero's offer the best range and adjustability of any pedal.
    3. More fore and aft and L/R adjustments than others, with the metal adapter plates.
    4. Easiest and best pedals to shim if you have leg length issues.
    5. Overall cleat/pedals platform size. Only the Blade gives to this much platform size.

    Cons:

    1. Cleats cost more to replace
    2. Issues with dirt in the cleats
    3. Over-tighting or lack or torque issues can lead to cleat issues.
    4. Speedplay as a company can be jerks on the legal side.

    Again, I will take any of the minor cons at this point over any other pedal system for ME. Dual entry and float of the Zero's is the main thing for me. I out a lot of clip-ess newbies on the LA Speedplay pedals and they love them!
    Good listing of the pros & cons, DB. Seems to me that each of the pros outweighs any one of the cons. Con #1-3 can easily be handled (30,000km on a pair of SP cleats so far). True, SP cleats require more maintenance, but they're definitely worth it.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by MerlinAma View Post
    Happy SPD-SL user for years.

    I've been on bike tours/rides where there is always some walking around at muddy rest stops. The Speedplay users are screwed.
    cafe covers are cheap and easy to slip on and off.

    It's pretty much second nature of mine to slip them on as part of my "dismounting the bike" routine.

    I used Look Keo's as my pedal for awhile, and while I did take me a bit to get used to the off the bike walking in the speedplays, I wouldn't go back for anything for on the bike comfort/ease.
    I know we just met and this is crazy....

  23. #23
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    I tried several different types when I first started riding, but nothing beats the Speedplays. If I anticipate a lot of walking on a given ride I might use Eggbeaters with mtb shoes instead. Or naked platform pedals with whatever shoe. But for straight up road riding, racing, TTing... Speedplays.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sylint View Post
    cafe covers are cheap and easy to slip on and off.
    I carry enough stuff in my jersey pockets. I don't need to use a pedal system that requires me to carry a cleat cover so I can stop and take a whiz behind a tree or fix a puncture.

    The nice thing about Looks and Shimanos is that you put them on your cranks, place the cleats on your shoe, and forget about them until the cleat needs replacing, no maintenance, no lubing the cleat every other ride with dry lube, no worries about the tiny cleat screws backing out, no cleaning grit from behind the springs, no nothing. They just work every time. And they don't rock laterally back and forth like Speedplays.

  25. #25
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    Another SPD-SL user here. I run zero-float. Maybe at this point, I could ride Look or Speedplay if I had to given the right cleats/setting, but it's a matter of why?

    Never had creaking issues, bearings will last forever, no hot spots,no need for "cafe covers", neat-o metal finish...but I guess there's those grams.

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