Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    294

    tandems are great for classic steel frame afectionadooos (tandems up hills)

    I just bought a beautiful Santana tandem. Ill post a pic later. if it were a solo bike with its nice Columbus tubes and this and that and what looks to be a brazed frame(!), and awesome clean 90s paint...this thing would cost maybe 2000$, but as a tandem i see lots of these really cheap on craigslist and I got this for 475 and sure theres another on there for less than 500$. States hand made here in California and I'm pretty sure its brazed as ive never seen tubes so smoothly joined otherwise. just a surprise to have my old obsession with a really nice steel frame satisfied so cheaply, and tandems are crazy!


    if a regular bike were to weigh 15 pounds and a tandem weigh 25 pounds, its less bike weight per person at 12.5lbs each riding the tandem so why don't they go up hills fast... or do they fly up hills? I know everyone has their fat wife on the back story but if you were to have maybe lance Armstrong on the back? maybe put lance on the back and Floyd gets the front this time.
    Last edited by hummina shadeeba; 05-14-2018 at 08:34 PM.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    136
    I have a 42lb tandem, it's a 'mountain tandem,' but in 1994 mountain bikes were road bikes with flat bars and clearance for 2" tires. It's not as fast as a single up hill, but 2 strong-ish riders can smash on flat ground. I've had a 700w FTP team on my tandem and it was a fkn missile. Stupid fun, and single riders could ride the draft or get dropped quick.

    The used tandem market is weird; if you're selling the right thing you'll get $$$, and they bottom out for more money, but in between it's fairly random what a tandem will fetch.

    Whatever. Moderately priced tandems are a great way to share some fun.


    Congrats on the new purchase and what sounds like a great deal!!

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Lombard's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    7,298
    Quote Originally Posted by hummina shadeeba View Post
    if a regular bike were to weigh 15 pounds and a tandem weigh 25 pounds, its less bike weight per person at 12.5lbs each riding the tandem so why don't they go up hills fast... or do they fly up hills? I know everyone has their fat wife on the back story but if you were to have maybe lance Armstrong on the back? maybe put lance on the back and Floyd gets the front this time.
    I happen to know a couple who ride a tandem. They are both strong riders individually (he is much stronger than I, she is about my strength). On the tandem, they leave me in the dust.

    I also know a few people in my club who ride triples.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,585
    I've never ridden one but from what I understand the two riders need to pedal in unison.

    So for argument sake let's say two riders are evenly matched and the bike is less than double the weight of their individual bikes. If I'm right about needing to pedal the same cadence then one or both of them is likely not doing what they do best and could be doing on their own bike. In other words not using optimal climbing style which they could use on their own bike.
    So there's that.

    The power to rate ratio would be better in the example you gave, let's ignore aerodynamic and any difference in drive train power loss here. They would theoretically be faster climbing then what they could do as an individual. But their individual skills aren't being used except in the unlikely case of two riders who always select the same gear and cadence.

  5. #5
    pmf
    pmf is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,837
    Santana tandems are high quality bikes.

    I've never ridden one. I see those couples in matching jerseys riding them, and think please God, never let it be me.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    136
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I've never ridden one but from what I understand the two riders need to pedal in unison.

    So for argument sake let's say two riders are evenly matched and the bike is less than double the weight of their individual bikes. If I'm right about needing to pedal the same cadence then one or both of them is likely not doing what they do best and could be doing on their own bike. In other words not using optimal climbing style which they could use on their own bike.
    So there's that.

    The power to rate ratio would be better in the example you gave, let's ignore aerodynamic and any difference in drive train power loss here. They would theoretically be faster climbing then what they could do as an individual. But their individual skills aren't being used except in the unlikely case of two riders who always select the same gear and cadence.
    Yep, it doesn't climb as well as 2 singles. I know a couple who bought one, but her natural cadence was about half his. It didn't work very well for them.

    It's most fun on rolling terrain with large constant radius corners.

  7. #7
    Proud luddite
    Reputation: azpeterb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    6,732
    Name:  IMG_8169.jpg
Views: 40
Size:  71.2 KB
    Quote Originally Posted by bubble View Post
    I have a 42lb tandem, it's a 'mountain tandem,' but in 1994 mountain bikes were road bikes with flat bars and clearance for 2" tires. It's not as fast as a single up hill, but 2 strong-ish riders can smash on flat ground. I've had a 700w FTP team on my tandem and it was a fkn missile. Stupid fun, and single riders could ride the draft or get dropped quick.

    The used tandem market is weird; if you're selling the right thing you'll get $$$, and they bottom out for more money, but in between it's fairly random what a tandem will fetch.

    Whatever. Moderately priced tandems are a great way to share some fun.


    Congrats on the new purchase and what sounds like a great deal!!
    Your tandem sounds a lot like the one my wife and I bought a few years ago. We think it was built around 1990 and the builder was a guy named Ian Riedel in Sonoma County. It's beautiful and very comfortable but it's a tank...I think it weighs in the low 40's like yours. It's a lot of fun to ride though. We got it on Craigslist for a great price. The owner mainly wanted to make sure it went to a good home...great sentimental value to him but he needed some money.
    Last edited by azpeterb; 05-15-2018 at 06:04 PM.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    294
    Quote Originally Posted by bubble View Post
    Yep, it doesn't climb as well as 2 singles. I know a couple who bought one, but her natural cadence was about half his. It didn't work very well for them.

    It's most fun on rolling terrain with large constant radius corners.

    it makes sense that having two riders out of their ideal cadence or something could be a hinderance but maybe you can lever off each other or something. maybe if the cranks were set up so theyre exactly opposite that would go better. are the cranks always in unison or ever opposite? is it a sure thing that tandems are slower up hills or faster? at least lower wind resistance as with a flat and the lower weight per rider.....but does it work in real life or slower up hills can you say ...or maybe I'm being too scientific about it and people don't get intense into racing times when they're at tandem stage.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails tandems are great for classic steel frame afectionadooos   (tandems up hills)-tandem.jpg  
    Last edited by hummina shadeeba; 05-15-2018 at 06:43 PM.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: velodog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,926
    Quote Originally Posted by hummina shadeeba View Post
    it makes sense that having two riders out of their ideal cadence or something could be a hinderance but maybe you can lever off each other or something. maybe if the cranks were set up so theyre exactly opposite that would go better. are the cranks always in unison or ever opposite? is it a sure thing that tandems are slower up hills or faster? at least lower wind resistance as with a flat and the lower weight per rider.....but does it work in real life or slower up hills can you say ...or maybe I'm being too scientific about it and people don't get intense into racing times when they're at tandem stage.
    I read somewhere that if you change the timing of the cranks 90 degrees it smoothens out the stroke. Captain at 3:00 stoker at 12:00. I don't know but it's easy enough to try.

    Yeah, they're slower up hills, but the way I understand it that's one of the places where having the cranks out of time helps. 'Sposed to keep the power curve constant.

    To get an idea about going up hill, put yours in a gear that starts to bog the two you down and stand on the pedals to regain momentum.

    Try the tandem sub forum, probably lots more experience to answer any of your questions there.
    Too old to ride plastic

Similar Threads

  1. classic steel vs steel vs Titanium?
    By Donn12 in forum Retro-Classic
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 09-05-2014, 05:18 PM
  2. Replies: 17
    Last Post: 11-11-2009, 09:52 PM
  3. Rinaldi - Mission Hills/Granada Hills/Northridge
    By sabbathu in forum Southern California
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-08-2006, 07:11 PM
  4. The hills, the hills, they're calling
    By PeatD in forum Other Areas
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-15-2005, 12:35 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.