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Thread: Tire/tube size

  1. #1
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    Tire/tube size

    The tire on my bike says

    700 x 32c - 28 x 1 5/8 x 1 1/4

    What size tube should I buy ?
    What size should I use for my bike computer ? It lists both 700 x 32c and 28

    Thanks for you help, this is my first time dealing with the 700 tires.

  2. #2
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    Most tubes that Ive come across go through and fit most tires. They should have a series of tubes at the shop; some with say 700c x 20-25 and others 28-32. Shouldn't be hard at all to find what you want.
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  3. #3
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    Get a Tube that is closest to the Size Markings on your Tires, but like waldo said, Tubes are very pliable/stretchable, and as long as you can get it easily inside the Tire, it will stretch to fill.
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  4. #4
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    Your tire is a 700 x 32C size. It will take a 700 x 28-32C (same as 27 x 1 1/4) tube. In a pinch 700 x 23-25C will work. This skinnier tube might need to be aired up a little before mounting for the tire to seat properly on the rim.

    Use the 700 x 32C computer setting. It's a 4 digit number (mm, I believe) relating to one rotation of the tire. If the table is missing a 700 x 32 number, just add a digit or two from the 28C number.

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    Thanks for clearing that up guys.

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    Tire tube size

    I have same type of tires as stated by Jeremy, which is 32-622(700 x 32C - 28 x 1 5/8 x 1 1/4)
    Can I replace it with the following tube, as I'm not sure if I bought right size of tube, which is 700 x 28-35 (27 x 1 1/8 x 1 1/4) or should I return it.

    Thanks in advance for your help

    Quote Originally Posted by jeremynj View Post
    The tire on my bike says

    700 x 32c - 28 x 1 5/8 x 1 1/4

    What size tube should I buy ?
    What size should I use for my bike computer ? It lists both 700 x 32c and 28

    Thanks for you help, this is my first time dealing with the 700 tires.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tire/tube size-img_20180310_230934.jpg  

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    Yep. You've got it made.

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    Attachment 322104

    BTW, I'm wondering how Jeremynj's tube is holding up after these 9 years????​ since he hasn't been back here since 2009, i guess it worked......
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

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    Quote Originally Posted by uzair1 View Post
    I have same type of tires as stated by Jeremy, which is 32-622(700 x 32C - 28 x 1 5/8 x 1 1/4)
    Can I replace it with the following tube, as I'm not sure if I bought right size of tube, which is 700 x 28-35 (27 x 1 1/8 x 1 1/4) or should I return it.

    Thanks in advance for your help
    Does your bike have Schrader valves and not presta?

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    Thanks for the reply Fredrico, does that mean I can use the tube

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzair1 View Post
    Thanks for the reply Fredrico, does that mean I can use the tube
    Is '32' between 28 and 35?
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    Yes it is but I'm not sure about other measurements, does they have to match the tire size too.

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    How do I check for bike valves?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzair1 View Post
    How do I check for bike valves?
    You should be paying someone to change your tube if you can't figure this out. You've heard of google, right?
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  15. #15
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    Tire/tube size

    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    You should be paying someone to change your tube if you can't figure this out. You've heard of google, right?
    Google may have been what brought him here...

    uzair1, the tube you have uses a “Schrader” valve. Newer road bikes typically use a “Presta” valve. Prestas are generally a bit narrower than the Schrader. Whether you have the right tube will depend on the size of the hole in the rim the valve will go through. We can’t really help with that.

    https://www.sheldonbrown.com/brandt/...-schrader.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by JerryLook View Post
    Does your bike have Schrader valves and not presta?
    My bike has Schrader valves

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzair1 View Post
    My bike has Schrader valves
    Then you’re good to go.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy... wait.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzair1 View Post
    Yes it is but I'm not sure about other measurements, does they have to match the tire size too.
    Thanks for the negative rep. I'm not surprised that you couldn't have made that comment in the thread. And I still think that you should have a shop change your tube if you can't figure out the answers to the most basic questions on your own. Installing a tube/tire correctly is the one of most overlooked and important tasks you can do. If you get it wrong you could have a flat at the worst time.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzair1 View Post
    Yes it is but I'm not sure about other measurements, does they have to match the tire size too.
    All the measurements fit standard 700C rims. You have the right diameter tube to fit 32C tires. You're going with larger diameter Shraeder valves, ok. Skinnier Presta valve would need a rubber grommet to keep it from cutting on the flanges.

    Put just enough air in the tube to give it shape. Smear talcum powder around the tube with your hands so it doesn't stick when installing.

    Mount the tire with one bead exposed. Work the tube evenly around the rim, making sure the valve is straight in the rim hole.

    Work the exposed bead into the rim as much as possible. Squeeze the air out of the tube if necessary. Roll the last several inches of tire bead into place with the heels of your hands like rolling dough, making sure the tube isn't pinched between bead and rim.

    Pump it up just enough to press the bead securely in place around the rim on both sides. Spin the wheel in your hands, looking to see if tire is seated evenly around the rim. Top it up to riding pressure, spin it in your hands again to make sure the tire is still evenly seated. And you're good to go.

    If there's a bulge, let the air out of the tube and knead the tire bead in place. The talcum powder allows the tube to slide in this stage, making the task a lot easier!

    But you already knew this, right?
    Last edited by Fredrico; 03-11-2018 at 09:52 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Thanks for the negative rep. I'm not surprised that you couldn't have made that comment in the thread. And I still think that you should have a shop change your tube if you can't figure out the answers to the most basic questions on your own. Installing a tube/tire correctly is the one of most overlooked and important tasks you can do. If you get it wrong you could have a flat at the worst time.
    Oh, he'll probably do just fine with 2 screwdrivers.....
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzair1 View Post
    Yes it is but I'm not sure about other measurements, does they have to match the tire size too.
    No. Your tires are 700c x 32. The tube you have is 700c x 28-35. The 700 is the diameter (well, literally 622, but they are called 700) must be exact. The 28-35 is the range of tire width that this tube will work for. So you're golden.

    Schraeder valves are like the valves in your car tires and are made of rubber. Presta valves are skinny metal valves used on most road bikes with skinny tires because their wheels are too narrow for a Schraeder valve to fit without compromising the structural integrity of the narrow rim. If you put a Presta valve tube in a Schraeder rim, the tube will have an aneurysm so-to-say, in other words, under high pressure, it could burst around the edges. If you try to put a Schraeder valve tube in a Presta rim, it simply won't fit.

    Use plastic levers, never any metal objects to mount a tire. No Time Toulouse is just being his troll self.

    Don't mind CXWrench, he just likes to give the new guys an initiation of sorts. His bark is worse than his bite. He is actually very knowledgeable and if you play along with him, can be very helpful.
    Last edited by Lombard; 03-11-2018 at 12:48 PM.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    No. Your tires are 700c x 32. The tube you have is 700c x 28-35. The 700 is the diameter (well, literally 622, but they are called 700) must be exact. The 28-35 is the range of tire width that this tube will work for. So you're golden.

    Schraeder valves are like the valves in your car tires and are made of rubber. Presta valves are skinny metal valves used on most road bikes with skinny tires because their wheels are too narrow for a Schraeder valve to fit without compromising the structural integrity of the narrow rim.

    Don't mind CXWrench, he just likes to give the new guys an initiation of sorts. His bark is worse than his bite. He is actually very knowledgeable and if you play along with him, can be very helpful.
    And I have a low tolerance for people that can't manage to figure out the most simple things. I will admit that this wasn't exactly the most simple...there were a bunch of numbers on the box.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzair1 View Post
    Yes it is but I'm not sure about other measurements, does they have to match the tire size too.
    Yes, they does half two. Not right size fit very badly.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    And I have a low tolerance for people that can't manage to figure out the most simple things. I will admit that this wasn't exactly the most simple...there were a bunch of numbers on the box.
    We were all beginners once.

    I think where the OP was confused was with the English measurements. The tire said 28 x 1 5/8 x 1 1/4. The tube said 27 x 1 1/8 x 1 1/4. If you are not familiar with bike tire size alphabet soup, what are you to make of this?

    My answer was simple. Ignore the English, it doesn't matter here. The metric measurements are all you need to know here and the tire and tube agree here.

    OP, as you can see, bicycle tire sizes can be even more confusing than car tire sizes. If you are interested, familiarize yourself with bike tire sizes here:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html

    The late Sheldon Brown's site will either help you understand sizing better (or confuse you even further!) Not to worry, the ISO or ETRTO is the actual bead seat diameter in mm. For example, a 622mm ISO tire or rim is a 700c in road bike sizing or a "29 inch" in mountain bike sizing even though in reality the rim is not 700mm or 29 inches. OK, have I made your head spin enough, LOL??
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  25. #25
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    Friggin' Continental still likes to put that 28 x 1 3/8 - 1 5/8 sizing on their 700x35 or 700x38 tires. This causes all kinds of confusion for the less experienced riders. Just drop it already, Continental!
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

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