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  1. #1
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    Touring Questions - Masi Randonneur

    Hi All,

    I am looking at purchasing the new Masi Randonneur. Started a new job And Iíd like to commute. Love the look of the Masi and the fat tires for doing varied weekend rides. Went to the shop and test rode it and it was nice, but had then weigh it and it weighs 30 lbs. Wondering if this is a typical weight for a touring bike or if it is significantly heavier than a normal tourer? My concern is trying to do some climbing on the weekend and regretting the weight.

    Also, anyone else have this bike? Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Huge in Japan
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    My main concern with this as a touring setup would be that compact double. Not sure what kind of climbing you are talking about or how much you plan to load it up but it's not something I would want for the rides I do on a loaded bike. Gearing is not a one size fits all thing I am only speaking about what would be my main concern. Unladen I don't believe that I'd be unhappy at all climbing with it in my area (it's a 32 rear and I climb with less teeth than that here).

    I've never weighed my touring bike but I have to believe that it has to be high 20s if not over 30 lbs with everything but cargo (fenders, handlebar bag, rear rack, oversize bottle cages, lights). I'd be happier losing a bit of weight off of me than my bike.
    Last edited by craiger_ny; 1 Week Ago at 04:31 AM.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by magnato1 View Post
    Hi All,

    I am looking at purchasing the new Masi Randonneur. Started a new job And Iíd like to commute. Love the look of the Masi and the fat tires for doing varied weekend rides. Went to the shop and test rode it and it was nice, but had then weigh it and it weighs 30 lbs. Wondering if this is a typical weight for a touring bike or if it is significantly heavier than a normal tourer? My concern is trying to do some climbing on the weekend and regretting the weight.

    Also, anyone else have this bike? Thoughts?
    Touring bikes and climbing bikes are on opposite sides of the cycling spectrum.
    You can climb on a 30 lb bike with short enough gearing...just not very fast.

    If you choose a bike closer to the middle like a carbon gravel bike with rack mounting capability, it will be a compromise. Horses for courses...or pick middle ground which won't be as effective on either margin.

  4. #4
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    Touring bikes are designed for maximum load, so they tend to be stout. Climbing on a 30 lb bike isn't as bad as you might think. At least for my new mtb it isn't as bad as I thought. But I don't think I would get a full on touring bike without a triple myself.

    You might consider a "gravel" or "adventure" bike, with mounts for racks and fenders. That should be stout enough for commute loads, and more nimble for fun rides. Masi has some, if you like the brand, as do many others.

    That said, the 2018 Masi Randonneur is a sweet looking bike.
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  5. #5
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    That's heavy but it's only an extra few pounds compared to a lighter option with the same features and in the same price range.
    Let's say 7 pounds overweight compared to another option same price range same features (in the price range to get much lighter it would probably be alloy not steel like this one). Really not a big deal if you are not racing.
    I have bikes that are 6 pounds apart and don't notice a different climbing.

  6. #6
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    I'm speaking for myself, here, but at some point a bike stops being a recreational toy and starts being an appliance. Thirty pounds is past that limit, IMHO; you will regret the weight on hills. Also, I think your granny gear will be 34x32, which sounds good until you hit a steep grade.

    This serves me well as beast of burden and foul/cold weather commuter, but I'm not doing weekend rides on it.

    Touring Questions - Masi Randonneur-20161111_182834.jpg

    Edit: check out Nashbar's touring bike as a commuter.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by magnato1 View Post
    Hi All,

    I am looking at purchasing the new Masi Randonneur. Started a new job And Iíd like to commute. Love the look of the Masi and the fat tires for doing varied weekend rides. Went to the shop and test rode it and it was nice, but had then weigh it and it weighs 30 lbs. Wondering if this is a typical weight for a touring bike or if it is significantly heavier than a normal tourer? My concern is trying to do some climbing on the weekend and regretting the weight.

    Also, anyone else have this bike? Thoughts?
    As a data point I owned a Novara Randonee touring bike, size XL, and it weighed in at a bit more than 27 lbs. That bike had a 4130 steel frame, cantilever brakes, wide range triple, fat rubber and some lower end components. No fenders though. I agree with the other that a full-on touring bike is perhaps overkill for the type of riding you described

  8. #8
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    I've been bike commuting for 25 years. I ride on a MUT, 33 mile round trip with 1200 feet of climbing. I do it 4-5 days a week, unless weather stops me. I have four road bikes, and I ride one of them. I don't get the perception that you need some special bulletproof bike with huge tires, racks and fenders to ride to work. How is riding to work different from riding anywhere else? 80% of my riding is riding to work. If I wouldn't ride a certain bike on the weekend, I wouldn't ride it to work either. A 30 lbs. touring bike fits into that category.

    Most people around here ride in on road bikes and carry a backpack. I do that sometimes and sometimes have a seat post rack. Mostly, I don't carry anything because I keep clothes, shoes, etc. at my office. Every week or two, I do a clothes swap.

    Ask yourself what are you going to have to carry when you commute? Do you need a rack, or will a back pack do? Can you keep clothes at work? What about the weekend rides? If they involve climbing, a road bike with compact chain rings (50/34) and a big cassette will work well. You'll enjoy riding it a lot more.

    Several people have asked me for advice on what kind of bike they should buy so they can commute to work. I always tell them a road bike. Invariably, they always buy a hybrid. The ones who stick with it end up on a road bike.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by magnato1 View Post
    Hi All,

    I am looking at purchasing the new Masi Randonneur. Started a new job And Iíd like to commute. Love the look of the Masi and the fat tires for doing varied weekend rides. Went to the shop and test rode it and it was nice, but had then weigh it and it weighs 30 lbs. Wondering if this is a typical weight for a touring bike or if it is significantly heavier than a normal tourer? My concern is trying to do some climbing on the weekend and regretting the weight.

    Also, anyone else have this bike? Thoughts?
    My .02: 30lbs seems heavy for a commuter, but only by a couple pounds. Seems like a decent weight for a dedicated touring bike.

    Compact gearing is fine for any dedicated rider on virtually any hill, as long as youíre willing to sweat on your commute and arenít fully loaded touring. Iím 185, and when I commuted it was ~1000í of vertical in steep rollers over 21 miles one way. With the new large cassette rears, 34x30 is normal and 34x34 isnít usually hard to find.

    I was on a 39x26 minimum and had no qualms about hitting some 9% two-three minute hills with a lunch, change of clothes, work boots, cup of coffee... that all added up to way over the weight difference between a 30lb bike and 22lb bike.

    I donít disagree that getting a bike you want to ride for giggles on the weekend as your commuter is a good idea, but thinking about the weight difference of the bike is probably overkill unless speed uphill is your goal. (Losing 5 pounds off the bike will cost money, losing 5 pounds from me would save money on beer).

    If you like the bike and will happily do some picnic/adventure/gravel/getaway rides on it on the weekend- get it. Itís a tool or toy, and all tool or toys make compromises in one direction or another.






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  10. #10
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    Hi All,

    Thanks for your responses. Many have suggested getting a gravel type bike and putting racks on it. Iíve thought about that as well and am still considering it.

    I also had a shop weigh one of Masiís gravel bikes with a carbon fork and it came in at 25 lbs. But, that bike didnít have fenders and it didnít have 47c tires on it and it had a carbon fork. If I bought the gravel bike and threw fenders on it, Iím probably looking at 28 lbs, right? At the same time, if I go tubeless on the Randonneur, Iíll probably drop down to 28 lbs, right? So, it kind of seems like a wash. Or am I missing something?

    Thanks.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by magnato1 View Post
    I also had a shop weigh one of Masiís gravel bikes with a carbon fork and it came in at 25 lbs. But, that bike didnít have fenders and it didnít have 47c tires on it and it had a carbon fork. If I bought the gravel bike and threw fenders on it, Iím probably looking at 28 lbs, right? At the same time, if I go tubeless on the Randonneur, Iíll probably drop down to 28 lbs, right? So, it kind of seems like a wash. Or am I missing something?

    Thanks.
    Fenders add about a pound, roughly. Tires, it depends. But certainly you could get a lighter set of wheels and tires, then swap them onto the Masi for fun rides. Add the cost of wheels+ tires + cassette (to make it quick and easy). Good used wheels are an option. Deep discounts on many things bike now and through January for new stuff.

    Masi is not the only option. Other brands will have lighter offerings.

    But I would say you sound like you are not really all that concerned about the weight. You like the bike, get the bike. Tweak the weight as you see fit, which you might not see fit to do.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by magnato1 View Post
    Hi All,

    Thanks for your responses. Many have suggested getting a gravel type bike and putting racks on it. Iíve thought about that as well and am still considering it.

    I also had a shop weigh one of Masiís gravel bikes with a carbon fork and it came in at 25 lbs. But, that bike didnít have fenders and it didnít have 47c tires on it and it had a carbon fork. If I bought the gravel bike and threw fenders on it, Iím probably looking at 28 lbs, right? At the same time, if I go tubeless on the Randonneur, Iíll probably drop down to 28 lbs, right? So, it kind of seems like a wash. Or am I missing something?

    Thanks.
    I don't think you'll regret the Randonneur unless you plan to tour with it. If that is the case I think the compact double will be the limiter. But for light duty stuff like commuting and fun rides I don't see any limiters with it, not even the 30 lb weight. I wouldn't get hung up on that, I do fun/ destination rides with my touring bike on the same roads and hills as my other bikes and like I said I'd bet it is in the 30 ib if not more range.

    I think that the Randonneur will be a fun bike but the gravel bike recommendations in this thread are appropriate alternatives as well. Shop around a bit if you have no immediate need to buy something.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by magnato1 View Post
    Hi All,

    I am looking at purchasing the new Masi Randonneur. Started a new job And Iíd like to commute. Love the look of the Masi and the fat tires for doing varied weekend rides. Went to the shop and test rode it and it was nice, but had then weigh it and it weighs 30 lbs. Wondering if this is a typical weight for a touring bike or if it is significantly heavier than a normal tourer? My concern is trying to do some climbing on the weekend and regretting the weight.

    Also, anyone else have this bike? Thoughts?
    And then there's the Bikes, Frames, etc. and Commuting and Touring forums for posts like this.

  14. #14
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    Touring has several different meaning. Are you talking about credit card touring. If so I wouldnít worry about either weight, or the gearing. If you are talking about self supported loaded touring, I would be concerned about the gearing, and maybe chain stay length

    A bike were you are riding self contained should have long enough chain stays that will allow you to center the weight over the axle. the size of your feet and panniers are the main factors. You donít want to hit your feet on the panniers. You can compromise by using smaller panniers or attaching them further back, although the mounting will have some effect on handling.

    If you tour with a trailer, this is not a concern

    If I was looking for a touring bike, I would be looking at a surly long haul trucker. Would work well for commuting, but more suited for moderate paced rides unloaded. If the engine has enough power, it can be used for fast paced rides

    When fully loaded, durability is far more important that weight. Whatís a couple of pounds when you load 40 or more on the bike

  15. #15
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    The randonneur seem like a nice bike Check out the cross check as for light touring it's perfect and can be easily stripped down for a commuter

  16. #16
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    That Masi looks like a decent bike for the money, but there are a couple of things that I would do different. Those tires are a bit overkill for a commuter, I'd go with 42mm's.

    And the fenders are a mite short and would do a better job if they were longer. If you drew a line from the front tires contact patch to the bottom of the bottom bracket the fender with a mud flap would ideally come down to that point. Otherwise road spray is going to get not only your feet but the drivetrain too. A little longer at the front of the tire wouldn't hurt either, I've heard of people with too short fenders there getting the road spray in there face and all over the head tube, stem and bars. With a longer fender the spray comes off the tire far enough forward that it is less of an issue.

    A longer fender in the rear, with a mud flap, wouldn't be to your benefit, but would keep the spray off any riding companions who were behind you.

    If your going to carry panniers on the bike, I would recommend front panniers and a low rider front rack. The bike should handle better with that then a rear rack and panniers. A rear load will tend to "wag" the bike, so to speak, whereas a front load won't. And if the bike is low trail it will ride with a handlebar bag like it wasn't even there.

    And like was already mentioned, a touring bike is going to be stout. I don't know the tubing specs for that bike, but if it's meant for front and rear panniers it's probably some heavy gage tubing. Some thing like https://crustbikes.com/products/the-romanceur-presale/ might serve you better, but the frame alone is about the same price as the complete Masi.

    For the money, that Masi looks to tic a lot of the right boxes.
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