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  1. #1
    $4000 bike - two bit legs
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    Trackstand applause

    About a mile from home, at the tail end of a 65 mile ride, I came to a stop light. As I always do, I did a track stand for as long as I could. I made it all the way through the red light until it turned green. When I got through the intersection, some guy on a motorcycle came up next to me and said how impressed he was at my ability to balance. And that he wished he could do it on his "bike". Finished with a "wow". Made my day.

    Cool. And heck, I only do track stands to impress the ladies.
    Paul in Northern Kentucky

    Across the mighty Ohio from Cincinnati:
    The Obesity Capital of the USA
    (Explains a lot of the intolerance about us riders, huh?)

  2. #2
    Sooper Dooper Moderator!
    Reputation: il sogno's Avatar
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    I was on a ride about a month ago where I pulled up to stop at a red light. A guy on a Cannondale pulled up beside me and did a track stand the entire way through the light cycle. Must have been at least a minute and a half.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview's Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by il sogno
    I was on a ride about a month ago where I pulled up to stop at a red light. A guy on a Cannondale pulled up beside me and did a track stand the entire way through the light cycle. Must have been at least a minute and a half.
    That's fun. I learned to trackstand because all the local collegiate guys do it. When I would go on a ride with 6 or 7 of them, I'd be the only guy with a foot down at the light, and as such would feel like a dumbass. Thus, I learned to trackstand. My current record's 5 minutes... then I got bored.
    "It's hard to tell the poison from the cure, so enjoy the disease."
    -Mohair_Chair

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Been practicing on my commute home. I can pretty much hold it out now on my MTB, but it's a whole different story on 23c tires.
    “Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the future of the human race.” - H.G. Wells

  5. #5
    Folsom City Blues...
    Reputation: Elfstone's Avatar
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    I pretty much learned a while back to track stand when I lived in San Francisco, with all the bike messengers doing it downtown, it was just a matter of time before I got bit with the bug. It's was much easier to learn to track stand on my mountain bike, after I got comfortable on the mountain bike I started doing on my roadie…

    Peace
    Tao Te Ching

    The movement of the Tao is to return
    The way of Tao is to yield

    Heaven, Earth and all things

    are born of existant world.

    The existent world is born of nothingness of Tao

    Master Lao Tzu

  6. #6
    triathlon hopeful
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    i've been trying to do it but I can't any tips? I wanna look cool too! haha

  7. #7
    hello
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    I rarely put my foot down on my commutes to work which is about 6 miles with over a dozen traffic signals. Of course, it's easy because I'm on a fixed gear...

  8. #8
    Unapologetic bike wh*re
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    I can trackstand far better on my mounatin bikes than I can my road bikes...

    We buddy and I rolled in after some off raoding one day and we're having a converstaion in the parking lot as he's loading up his bike...he looks at me and asks me how the hell I'm doing THAT.

    I had pulled up and kicked my right leg back so my shin was resting on the saddle and had been holding this trackstand for as long as it took him to load his bike in his car but once he pointed it out (and I started thinking about it) out I promptly fell right off my bike.

    That seems to be my key for trackstands...I can't think too much about what I'm doing.
    Last edited by Sixty Fiver; 09-02-2007 at 01:46 PM.

  9. #9
    $4000 bike - two bit legs
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    I"m with you

    If I start concentrating on what I'm doing then...poof...it's gone. I started doing trackstands just to equal some racer dudes I used to ride with.
    Paul in Northern Kentucky

    Across the mighty Ohio from Cincinnati:
    The Obesity Capital of the USA
    (Explains a lot of the intolerance about us riders, huh?)

  10. #10
    Who needs a map?
    Reputation: nonsleepingjon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by newbie13
    i've been trying to do it but I can't any tips?
    A true trackstand requires either a fixed gear or a slight incline so that you can move back and forth a bit. For freewheelers like me, I get by with a complete stop, slight roll forward, stop, etc. I can't do it indefinitely, but can usually avoid putting a foot down.

    The way I learned is just to practice coming to a very smooth stop and holding it for as long as possible. Keep your head up, your eyes focused as far out as possible, use your core muscles to hold your torso up and relax your arms, and absolutely do not think about balancing. If you think about it, the magic is gone. Practice that at every stop, and you'll get good quick. End each ride with a slow race (last person to the finish line wins, can't put a foot down, must go in a reasonably straight line, can't go backwards).

    // for added entertainment, watch motorcyclists stopping and getting moving again. You'll quickly be able to tell who practices low speed maneuvers and who doesn't.
    "If we're to be honest with ourselves, achieving the end of the exercise was never the point of the exercise, was it?"
    ~Adam Savage

  11. #11
    Impulse Athletic Coaching
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    Quote Originally Posted by nonsleepingjon
    A true trackstand requires either a fixed gear or a slight incline so that you can move back and forth a bit. For freewheelers like me, I get by with a complete stop, slight roll forward, stop, etc. I can't do it indefinitely, but can usually avoid putting a foot down.
    Not true! The real skill is those w/o fixed gears who can use their brakes and body movements to go forward and backward Brake, lean forward, "throw" self backward while simultaneously letting go of brake, etc.

    My best trackstand was during the longest light of my life -- about 2 minutes. It was almost pure luck. I either hit it and can go forever, or don't and can only hold it for like 10 seconds. I don't really try to do 5min long trackstands as there is never a need. Doing it in one shot, and not rolling forward to try again, is much more important.

  12. #12
    Who needs a map?
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    Quote Originally Posted by iliveonnitro
    Not true! The real skill is those w/o fixed gears who can use their brakes and body movements to go forward and backward Brake, lean forward, "throw" self backward while simultaneously letting go of brake, etc.
    I think I'd end up underneath my bike if I tried that, but that would work too. I've also been able to roll backward on my mountain bike by grabbing the front brake hard enough to compress front shock, then letting the rebound push the bike back a bit.

    There were a few posts about trackstands being easier on a mountain bike. I'm not entirely sure, but I would suspect that this is due more to geometry (fork rake, no toe overlap, possibly more upright position) than to tire size. I think the smaller front chainring helps as well.
    "If we're to be honest with ourselves, achieving the end of the exercise was never the point of the exercise, was it?"
    ~Adam Savage

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Doing a trackstand...

    Slowly roll into the area where you'll be doing your stand by lightly feathering your brakes.
    Get your a** off the saddle. Head-up, weight slightly forward over bars
    Have pedals parallel.
    Come to a complete stop, ether you have drifted up a slight incline to a stop or lightly apply brakes to bring to stop.
    Turn wheel towards uphill gradient, about 20-30 degrees.
    Just hold it there using the pedals and brakes to keep you upright. Get comfortable rocking foward and backward ever so slightly, this will help with balance.

    Been commuting for 20+ years, got tired of clipping out at the lights and learned how to trackstand. Easiest on a fixie, MTB second easiest, standard freewheeling road bike most difficult.

    It takes awhile to master. Been trying to teach it to others in my club, they're still falling over.


    It only hurts if you think.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    I just got my first fixie, and I was amazed at how much easier it was to track stand. If you can do it on a freewheel road bike, you cand do it on anything.

    Brian
    TheRoadBike.com

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview's Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by nonsleepingjon
    I think I'd end up underneath my bike if I tried that, but that would work too. I've also been able to roll backward on my mountain bike by grabbing the front brake hard enough to compress front shock, then letting the rebound push the bike back a bit.

    There were a few posts about trackstands being easier on a mountain bike. I'm not entirely sure, but I would suspect that this is due more to geometry (fork rake, no toe overlap, possibly more upright position) than to tire size. I think the smaller front chainring helps as well.
    I think it's due to geometry. I don't think the wider contact patch has much (anything) to do with it.

    I would think the smaller front chainring is worse. I find that I trackstand much better in my big ring than I do a little ring, because the freewheel engages faster so I can make quicker adjustments.
    "It's hard to tell the poison from the cure, so enjoy the disease."
    -Mohair_Chair

  16. #16
    Squirrel Hunter
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    Ride Like A Girl

    Practice, Practice, Practice... here are some hints:

    http://www.teamestrogen.com/articles/asa_trackstand.asp



    Quote Originally Posted by nonsleepingjon
    A true trackstand requires either a fixed gear or a slight incline so that you can move back and forth a bit. For freewheelers like me, I get by with a complete stop, slight roll forward, stop, etc. I can't do it indefinitely, but can usually avoid putting a foot down.
    For me it is usually the stop, roll an inch, stop...

    My kid can track stand on anything with two wheels, fixed or freewheel, fat or skinny.

    At this weekends tandem rally the one couple we were riding with was also able to trackstand so my wife and I would have contest at the intersections with them while all the rest the tandems would be clipping out and struggling to get started again.
    Luck is the intersection of preparation and opportunity.

  17. #17
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnnysmooth
    Doing a trackstand...

    Slowly roll into the area where you'll be doing your stand by lightly feathering your brakes.
    Get your a** off the saddle. Head-up, weight slightly forward over bars
    Have pedals parallel.
    Come to a complete stop, ether you have drifted up a slight incline to a stop or lightly apply brakes to bring to stop.
    Turn wheel towards uphill gradient, about 20-30 degrees.
    Just hold it there using the pedals and brakes to keep you upright. Get comfortable rocking froward and backward ever so slightly, this will help with balance.


    Perfect instructions.

    When I started commuting from work 3 years ago, I started practicing the track stand because there was nothing to do at the lights. Some lights are 5 mins long. Today 5 min is not a problem. As long as I at least a rock to act as a small gradient to rock against I can do it forever. Downhill, fo-get-a-bout-it

  18. #18
    Yo no fui.
    Reputation: Pablo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keeping up with Junior
    Practice, Practice, Practice... here are some hints:

    http://www.teamestrogen.com/articles/asa_trackstand.asp

    For all we know, there's a pair of corgis buttressing that cyclist.
    "It is better to conquer yourself, than to win a thousand battles." -Dhammapada

    "Fact is only what you believe; fact and fiction work as a team." Jack Johnson

    "A true cyclist sometimes has to bite the dust before he can reach the stars.” Laurent Fignon

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Yup I'm with Johnnysmooth on this one. Great instructions there sir.

    Just one or two "hints" in addition: You'll bring that front wheel to the right, and your right leg will be the forward leg. You need some resistance to learn at first
    so big ring, and middle of the cassette. When you're rolling to that final stop, try and make sure your right foot/pedal is at about the 1 or 2 o'clock position, as this will give you added leverage against which to work.

    The above advice about finding a small incline is perfect for that added resistance, and position your bike so it's a bit more lateral to the road direction, or at least 45 degrees, with your wheel turned toward the direction incline. As you improve you'll need less of this resistance in gearing and incline, and soon you'll be a pro on the flat as well.

    Finally, for practice it's best to get out on your tennies, if you have to make a quick save right before you fall over, you won't have the undded stress of getting unclipped before you actually do fall over.

    And to PaulC the OP, nice work! Glad someone complimented you for it. Wonder if motorcycle-guy went home to practice?

  20. #20
    $4000 bike - two bit legs
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    Thanks

    And to PaulC the OP, nice work! Glad someone complimented you for it. Wonder if motorcycle-guy went home to practice?[/QUOTE]

    ....and I wonder if the motorcycle guy fell over when he practiced?
    Paul in Northern Kentucky

    Across the mighty Ohio from Cincinnati:
    The Obesity Capital of the USA
    (Explains a lot of the intolerance about us riders, huh?)

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Hey Killroy, now that you've mastered it with an uphill incline, time to start practicing on those downhill grades. More difficult, you bet, but hey, what else is there to do when you're waiting for tthat light to turn and you'll certainly have a jump on the 4-wheel monsters out there ;-)


    It only hurts if you think.

  22. #22
    confirmed masher
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    OP: nice job, trackstanding is tons of fun

    learning it is a bit tough at first, i spent a few nights on my street just getting used to the balancing. i found it easier when you practice rolling the bike back and forth gently like rocking horse with the wheel at 45deg. once you got that down without falling, you just need to apply pressure on the front pedal then equally on the back, and continue. this is on fixed gear by the way. i wasn't getting anywhere with it despite reading the tips from the above posted sites, but one day last week i just went to a parkinglot at 9pm and left at 1130, and i could trackstand. learn out of the saddle trackstand first... seated is hard. i found learning on an uphill harder than learning on a flat... downhill is another story...

    ps. learn without clipless first.. it will save u a lot of falling.

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Boston messengers

    Not long ago I was the guy in the car applauding. I was in downtown Boston, in my car, at a light when a messenger road up next to me. He did a no-handed trackstand while rolling the front wheel back and forth with his foot. I felt like I had paid admission to the circus. When the light turned green, I clapped for the guy.

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    No handed trackstands are fun. They arent as difficult as they look either. If you are doing the normal one right there is no tension in your arms anyway. That said, i only do them on my MTB with flat pedals, and never in a pressure situation (i.e. next to a full bus!)

  25. #25
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Never tried or had the desire to do one. God gave me feet, I use them.
    Don't forget to breathe.

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