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  1. #1
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    Trek Emonda snaps in half

    Hmmm... maybe they tried a tiny bit TOO hard to prove they could make a disc brake bike come in below the UCI weight limit?
    Trek-Segafredo rider's bike snapped clean in half in Herald Sun Tour crash - Cycling Weekly
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  2. #2
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    It's a bike component, it got smashed in a smash. Fiber is designed to be light and strong but it's not designed to stand forces outside of the normal parameters. Might look like bad PR but the bike did it's job. I am presuming the damage was done in the crash and was not the cause.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    Hmmm... maybe they tried a tiny bit TOO hard to prove they could make a disc brake bike come in below the UCI weight limit?
    Trek-Segafredo rider's bike snapped clean in half in Herald Sun Tour crash - Cycling Weekly
    You trying to stir up **** after the last week and the 'fork debacle'?
    I work for some bike racers
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  4. #4
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    I want to see a vector diagram illustrating how the disc brake forces sheared that frame in half.
    Maybe the front/back balance needs to be address on those disk brakes!
    BANNED

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    You trying to stir up **** after the last week and the 'fork debacle'?
    Hey, the fork didn't break! . They must be doing something right!

    Oops! Guess not. Have to wonder how flippy it rode when intact.

  6. #6
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    Sorry, didn't know about/follow "the fork debacle" (somebody have a link?). Yeah, bikes break, though the others didn't and riders don't often walk away from crashes bad enough to snap a frame in half as Didier did in this case. If you're going to put extra weight on a bike in the form of disc brakes and still be under 15lbs, that weight's gotta come from somewhere. Trek may be trying too hard to prove point is all I'm sayin'.

    Which makes me wonder... does Trek make good bikes?
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwisimon View Post
    It's a bike component, it got smashed in a smash. Fiber is designed to be light and strong but it's not designed to stand forces outside of the normal parameters. Might look like bad PR but the bike did it's job. I am presuming the damage was done in the crash and was not the cause.
    Yep, bike broke from bad road race crash. It happens. Nothing to see here, nothing to see.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    Sorry, didn't know about/follow "the fork debacle" (somebody have a link?). Yeah, bikes break, though the others didn't and riders don't often walk away from crashes bad enough to snap a frame in half as Didier did in this case. If you're going to put extra weight on a bike in the form of disc brakes and still be under 15lbs, that weight's gotta come from somewhere. Trek may be trying too hard to prove point is all I'm sayin'.

    Which makes me wonder... does Trek make good bikes?
    Here ya go:

    Roubaix-Elite Specialized Frame defect

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    I want to see a vector diagram illustrating how the disc brake forces sheared that frame in half.
    Maybe the front/back balance needs to be address on those disk brakes!
    If only you could see the anti-cogentiveness of your posts and the obtrusiveness of the amorclativity of your posts, then you'd realize that the shallowness of my propensity to blow smoke out of my own anus is only exceeded by the logicalivity of your own posts. Hey, I've been building bikes since I was 10 and I'm an engineer! You couldn't and wouldn't possibly understand. Oh, and everything Spesh builds is completely bomb proof and completely uber-engineered.

  10. #10
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    We have seen bikes break like that before in racing crashes. This is nothing new.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ogre View Post
    If only you could see the anti-cogentiveness of your posts and the obtrusiveness of the amorclativity of your posts, then you'd realize that the shallowness of my propensity to blow smoke out of my own anus is only exceeded by the logicalivity of your own posts. Hey, I've been building bikes since I was 10 and I'm an engineer! You couldn't and wouldn't possibly understand. Oh, and everything Spesh builds is completely bomb proof and completely uber-engineered.
    Oh my.
    Too old to ride plastic

  12. #12
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    I would imagine that even a steel frame would have been unrideable after such an incident.
    Get a better saddle: www.kontactbike.com

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    I would imagine that even a steel frame would have been unrideable after such an incident.
    So you saw the crash up close and know what forces the frame experienced? I see at least one other non-broken frame on the ground.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  14. #14
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    Bicycles with crumple zones. It was only a matter of time

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    So you saw the crash up close and know what forces the frame experienced? I see at least one other non-broken frame on the ground.
    No. Did you? What would the other bikes have to do with what happened to this one? They weren't caught in an explosion.

    What I am saying is that forces high enough to sever a frame tube or two should also be sufficient to at least bend any pro level frame's thinwall tubing.


    What are you saying?
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradkay View Post
    We have seen bikes break like that before in racing crashes. This is nothing new.
    Yep, and most of them were carbon. . Or aluminum.

    Can't remember seeing a steel frame break in half on top tube and down tube. Steel crumples in a crash.

    The lighter the thing is, especially a bike frame that has to handle the torsional flex of a 180# rider barreling down a mountain at 45 mph, the more possibilities of stress failure, if that's the right term.

    It would take more than wiping out on the road in a race to snap a steel frame like the one above. If carbon were stronger than steel, it wouldn't separate so easily. I don't give a durn whut the engineers say. Some of 'em are so locked away with their data sheets, they miss the obvious.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Yep, and most of them were carbon. . Or aluminum.

    Can't remember seeing a steel frame break in half on top tube and down tube. Steel crumples in a crash.

    The lighter the thing is, especially a bike frame that has to handle the torsional flex of a 180# rider barreling down a mountain at 45 mph, the more possibilities of stress failure, if that's the right term.

    It would take more than wiping out on the road in a race to snap a steel frame like the one above. If carbon were stronger than steel, it wouldn't separate so easily. I don't give a durn whut the engineers say. Some of 'em are so locked away with their data sheets, they miss the obvious.
    There is no advantage in a frame that bends instead of fractures. Unrideable is unrideable.
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  18. #18
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    Richie Porte hit a moped last year in the TdF. Froome hit Porte who is softer than a moped. The Pinarello breaks.

    This was the second time Froome broke a Pinarello in that race.

    Why no thread then as to why Pinarello not making a strong enough bike?


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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by izza View Post
    Richie Porte hit a moped last year in the TdF. Froome hit Porte who is softer than a moped. The Pinarello breaks.

    This was the second time Froome broke a Pinarello in that race.

    Why no thread then as to why Pinarello not making a strong enough bike?


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    If a bike was strong enough to not break when you ride into something, how much would it weigh?


    The presumption is that carbon frames are weaker because they break when crashed instead of folding. But carbon frames have similar or even greater ultimate strength, so it is fair to assume that an crash hard enough to break carbon would have severally bent steel or aluminum.

    I'm not a huge carbon fan, but a crash is violent thing. Everything worth riding is going to break.
    Last edited by Kontact; 02-12-2018 at 02:07 AM.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ogre View Post
    Oh, and everything Spesh builds is completely bomb proof and completely uber-engineered.
    They used to make the worlds best bikes bar none, but this probably means they have been dethroned and Trek is now #1!

    Another case of a 300lb brother was ramming curbs on a perfect bike from the company that now builds the best bikes in the world!
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwisimon View Post
    It's a bike component, it got smashed in a smash. Fiber is designed to be light and strong but it's not designed to stand forces outside of the normal parameters. Might look like bad PR but the bike did it's job. I am presuming the damage was done in the crash and was not the cause.
    This ^^^^ F1 cars are designed to strategically disintegrate in a crash to attenuate energy, why not bicycles.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    What I am saying is that forces high enough to sever a frame tube or two should also be sufficient to at least bend any pro level frame's thinwall tubing.
    With a steel frame, even if it was bent would most likely remain in one piece. That means more potential for the rider to retain some semblance of control, and safety, despite the unpredictability of a crash.

    They're building carbon frames so light that they're designed to withstand "riding forces" only. That's because the fibers are oriented to the stresses at the particular locations in the frame.

    Steel is anisotropic; it has the same strength in all directions, which makes it stronger in withstanding certain forces that carbon frames ignore.

    I didn't see the crash that caused the frame in the OP to fail, but it's entirely possible applying the front brake hard or long term repeated brake application, combined with hidden fiber breakage in the underlying layers of carbon, caused the crash. The front of the frame could have been too strong for the rear half. Just speculation, of course.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ogre View Post
    If only you could see the anti-cogentiveness of your posts and the obtrusiveness of the amorclativity of your posts, then you'd realize that the shallowness of my propensity to blow smoke out of my own anus is only exceeded by the logicalivity of your own posts.
    I can see thing are getting out of hand. Posting vacations are now being issued.
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  24. #24
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    750g disc frame for the win! lol all the weekend warriors reading this now probably get a little scared. But me, I'm not touching it. "Bike does it job", by breaking in half and saving the rider. Is this a joke? Money grow on trees?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    If a bike was strong enough to not break when you ride into something, how much would it weigh?


    The presumption is that carbon frames are weaker because they break when crashed instead of folding. But carbon frames have similar or even greater ultimate strength, so it is fair to assume that an crash hard enough to break carbon would have severally bent steel or aluminum.

    I'm not a huge carbon fan, but a crash is violent thing. Everything worth riding is going to break.
    Agreed.

    Whether disc or not, things break in a crash.


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