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  1. #1
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    Turntable riser ring by Kurt Kinetic makes no sense

    Due to time restriction and can't go on the road much, I'm training on the Kurt Kinetic Rock n' Roll trainer. Trainer is pretty good. I've got little issue with leaning on one side or the other, but that's another issue than what I wanted to discuss. What I have problem with is the turntable riser ring. The riser ring for your front wheel swivels which seem like a good idea so I bought it too, but after trying it out, it makes no sense. Think about this, when does your front wheel turn? It only turns when you're going super slow speed. When you're riding with any speed, the front wheel goes with the entire bike thus you lean in the turn. You don't just turn your front wheel. So, when I ride with the turntable riser ring, it is so unnatural when your front wheel moves around without the bike. You don't deal with this when you're actually on the road and having the front wheel move around won't help with your "smoothness." I think this is one of the worst products that I have ever bought. I just cannot believe that they're selling this.

  2. #2
    Not a rocket surgeon.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BummBull View Post
    I think this is one of the worst products that I have ever bought. I just cannot believe that they're selling this.
    There you have your answer. Because people buy this crap.

  3. #3
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    It doesn't swivel and move around if you are holding onto your bars.

  4. #4
    wim
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    Quote Originally Posted by BummBull View Post
    Think about this, when does your front wheel turn? It only turns when you're going super slow speed.
    Not quite right. The front wheel of many riders also turns in relation to the frame during an all-out sprint and during climbing at maximum effort with lower cadences. It happens either because of bike lean wheel flop (see photo below) or because a rider exerts an uneven pull on the handlebar as a counterforce to the pedal stroke (left pedal stroke-left side of bar, and vice-versa). If you look at sprints and climbing carefully, you'll see this as a wavering line.

    Whether or not the turntable function of the riser is worth anything is another matter. You can simulate real road riding only up to a certain point. This may be a case of trying too hard to get a perfect simulation of an all-out sprint or hard climb.
    Last edited by wim; 07-25-2013 at 03:48 AM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by wim View Post
    Not quite right. The front wheel of many riders also turns in relation to the frame during an all-out sprint and during climbing at maximum effort with lower cadences. It happens either because of bike lean wheel flop (see photo below) or because a rider exerts an uneven pull on the handlebar as a counterforce to the pedal stroke (left pedal stroke-left side of bar, and vice-versa). If you look at sprints and climbing carefully, you'll see this as a wavering line.

    Whether or not the turntable function of the riser is worth anything is another matter. You can simulate real road riding only up to a certain point. This may be a case of trying too hard to get a perfect simulation of an all-out sprint or hard climb.
    This.
    I have the turntable riser ring. I like the idea that I have some ability to turn the handlebars. My complaint is that the little rubber feet on the bottom keep falling off.

  6. #6
    wim
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    It occurred to me that the word "turntable" may be responsible for some misunderstandings. It has nothing to do with turning, as in going through a corner or a curve on a bicycle.

    And as a footnote: the front wheel of bicycle turns in relation to the frame at all times regardless of speed or line. It may be very little, but it has to turn to keep the rider upright. Lock down the headset and try to ride a bike—you'll get immediate verification of this. :-)

  7. #7
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    I'm glad I posted this post as I didn't know that front wheel turned at all when you go certain speed even on hard climbs or sprints. I guess my problem with the turntable is that it turns excessively if you pull on your handlebar where it makes it unnatural and to me, it's more natural with fixed riser. Even in all out sprint, your front wheel only turns slightly, right? If it only turns slightly, you can get that feel by just having a fixed riser as it will move slightly if you're pulling.
    I'll give the turntable another shot tonight.
    Now, on to my next issue with Rock n' Roll leaning to one side. It's only slightly, but it gets annoying that I sometime have to lean right to left to get the bike to center again.
    I have Kinetic's standard Road Machine trainer as well, and I might use that couple times a week on hard steady effort as it's easier to do on that when i don't have to worry about straightening the bike. Only reason that I got the Rock n' Roll is that I get pain on my IT band when I ride exclusively on a stationary bike, but it doesn't bother me at all when i'm riding outdoors or on Rock n' Roll.

  8. #8
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    Re: Turntable riser ring by Kurt Kinetic makes no sense

    Quote Originally Posted by BummBull View Post
    I'm glad I posted this post as I didn't know that front wheel turned at all when you go certain speed even on hard climbs or sprints. I guess my problem with the turntable is that it turns excessively if you pull on your handlebar where it makes it unnatural and to me, it's more natural with fixed riser. Even in all out sprint, your front wheel only turns slightly, right? If it only turns slightly, you can get that feel by just having a fixed riser as it will move slightly if you're pulling.
    I'll give the turntable another shot tonight.
    Now, on to my next issue with Rock n' Roll leaning to one side. It's only slightly, but it gets annoying that I sometime have to lean right to left to get the bike to center again.
    I have Kinetic's standard Road Machine trainer as well, and I might use that couple times a week on hard steady effort as it's easier to do on that when i don't have to worry about straightening the bike. Only reason that I got the Rock n' Roll is that I get pain on my IT band when I ride exclusively on a stationary bike, but it doesn't bother me at all when i'm riding outdoors or on Rock n' Roll.
    The rock and roll rocks to prevent breaking carbon frames (in addition to providing a more real road feel). Maybe the turntable helps prevent broken forks. When you crank on the bars during a sprint, the wheel can move. With a riser, it's held pretty rigid. Twisting isn't something carbon likes.
    Other countries need to stop hatin' or we'll unfriend them. - Christine

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  9. #9
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    "When you're riding with any speed, the front wheel goes with the entire bike thus you lean in the turn. You don't just turn your front wheel."

    Try locking your headset to test that theory.

    I think the turntable thing is great. I would definitely be putting undue stress on the fork when trying to simulate sprints and climbing (basically anything out of the saddle) on the r & r trainer.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatyPius View Post
    The rock and roll rocks to prevent breaking carbon frames (in addition to providing a more real road feel). Maybe the turntable helps prevent broken forks. When you crank on the bars during a sprint, the wheel can move. With a riser, it's held pretty rigid. Twisting isn't something carbon likes.
    broken fork? is Hulk riding the bike?

  11. #11
    Dr. Buzz Killington
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    I suppose I was lucky that the riser ring was included with my R&R trainer. I got it on eBay for $315 new in box. The riser ring is somewhat useful but mostly for keeping your balance.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BummBull View Post
    Now, on to my next issue with Rock n' Roll leaning to one side. It's only slightly, but it gets annoying that I sometime have to lean right to left to get the bike to center again.
    I have Kinetic's standard Road Machine trainer as well, and I might use that couple times a week on hard steady effort as it's easier to do on that when i don't have to worry about straightening the bike. Only reason that I got the Rock n' Roll is that I get pain on my IT band when I ride exclusively on a stationary bike, but it doesn't bother me at all when i'm riding outdoors or on Rock n' Roll.
    Actually, I heard that there is a fix, it's about tightening down on the bolts so that you can make it not lean, give them a call, their customer service is great! Mine is still tilted a bit to the left, but I've been okay with it so far, but probably use it once every 2 weeks when the weather is too hot or I don't have time to go out in the morning.

    Also, here's their first post on their FAQ about rock n' roll leaning to one side:

    Stationary Indoor Bike Trainer - Kinetic by Kurt
    Last edited by albert1028; 07-25-2013 at 06:39 AM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Social Climber View Post
    This.
    I have the turntable riser ring. I like the idea that I have some ability to turn the handlebars. My complaint is that the little rubber feet on the bottom keep falling off.
    LOL, I thought it was just too hot out in the shop. I've cleaned mine off need to find a better adhesive.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by SauronHimself View Post
    I suppose I was lucky that the riser ring was included with my R&R trainer. I got it on eBay for $315 new in box. The riser ring is somewhat useful but mostly for keeping your balance.
    Turntable riser ring helping with keeping your balance is what I read in lots of reviews so I decided to get it, but it just feels so unnatural with the front wheel moving around a lot. I don't think my balance is terrible as I ride on rollers a lot and can go no hands on it as well as doing many crit races in a tight pack. Not saying my balance is perfect, but it's not terrible. I'm just trying to figure what I'm missing as all reviews say that it's great for keeping balance and I just think it's awkward.

  15. #15
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    I just picked up one of these risers last week. Before having it, I had a standard CycleOps fixed base mated to my Kurt R&R trainer. I decided to try it out today and decided that I quite like it. It's not like I sit there crank the wheel left and right but it does make everything feel more "loose" and thus requiring my body strength to keep things straight. It makes switching hands between the handlebar positions and drinking while riding more difficult as well...quite like being on the road. If you have bad form and take one hand off of the bars...they wobble...like in real life.

    It's not perfect but I consider it to be a good mate to a R&R trainer. Also...It's pretty cheap.

  16. #16
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    Dude, suck it up. Real riders do manuals the whole time on the trainer. No need for silly riser thingy dohickies.

    You think Peter Sagan got good at manuals across the finish line from CX or BMX? Nope, hrs doing manuals on the trainer.
    It's a fire road.............
    I'm on a road bike..........

    They have enough in common to blast down it.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by BummBull View Post
    Turntable riser ring helping with keeping your balance is what I read in lots of reviews so I decided to get it, but it just feels so unnatural with the front wheel moving around a lot.
    I have no idea what it is you are doing on that trainer, but you do understand that, on a real bike on the road, if you do what you seem to be doing on the trainer, the front wheel would move just as much, at least? The main difference would be that if you do that kind of nonsense on the road, you'd just crash... I have the same trainer, and I have never had this issue, nor do I understand why anyone would have that problem, see above.

  18. #18
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    If you are using a stationary ring, the tendency in hard efforts would be to tug on
    the bars to augment your leg force, something you would not be able to do on the
    road. I like that the riser forces me to "unweight" my arms and balance my upper
    body independent of my legs. This also shows I have a tendency to pull to one side,
    which enables me to consciously work to reduce or eliminate this tendency.
    All I said was that our son, the apple of our three eyes, Martha being a cyclops, our son is a beanbag, and you get testy!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoehn9111 View Post
    If you are using a stationary ring, the tendency in hard efforts would be to tug on
    the bars to augment your leg force, something you would not be able to do on the
    road.
    Why is it again that I cannot do this on the road? In fact, in a hard sprint, just about everybody does just that.

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