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  1. #26
    Adorable Furry Hombre
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    Quote Originally Posted by survivor82 View Post
    Several close friends and I have been working on a bicycle saddle bag prototype and would like to get some inputs and feedback from fellow cyclists here. We want to make sure we are on the right path to help address the issues that current saddle bags have.

    As avid cyclists ourselves, we often time have our dilemmas when it comes to saddle bag. Practical or aesthetic? Size or storage? At one hand we want the saddle bag practicality of carrying around the essentials items like spare tubes and multitools during our rides. On the other hand we want to keep the clean aesthetic of our bike. In the case where the practical sense won the first dilemma, we typically still need to trade off between storage space or utterly bulky saddle bag. Even the ones least concern with aesthetic would shake their heads staring at the brick like saddle bag hanging below the bicycle saddle. Majority of the saddle bags in the market today are boxy and black, which doesnít help to promote the saddle bagís stylish or aesthetic aspect.

    What do you guys look for when choosing a saddle bag? What is in your wish list of the ultimate saddle bag? If you are not a saddle bag user today, what is holding you back and what will make you switch camp?

    Would you be interested if there is a saddle bag that can do the following?
    1. Compact enough to carry most of your essential items. Think 2 spare tubes, 2 tire levers, 2 CO2 canisters, Multitools with chain tool, patch kit, all these in a compact form factor.
    2. Stylish enough to not ruin your bike aesthetic, this can be quite subjective and personal but assume it meets your styling requirement.
    3. Quick attach and release. Much faster than dealing with Velcro.
    4. Abundant styling/color choices.

    We love to hear your inputs and hopefully we will be able to create something that all the cyclists want to use. Thanks!
    A saddle bag big enough to hold all of that....isn't "compact".

    The Topeak wedge I have on my roadie is what I'd call "compact", and it will barely hold (to bursting) 2x 700x23C tubes by themselves.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanE View Post
    My biggest complaint about saddle bags I've owned in the past is that the attachment mechanism fails. Either it was a strap that was poorly stitched to the bag (both the strap that attaches to the seat rails, and the strap that wraps around the seatpost), or the plastic clip that attaches to the seat rails broke. Also zippers that broke or froze up. So whatever you come up with, make it robust. Ease of removal / attachment is nice for those of us with multiple bikes - just be sure it doesn't require any tools. Also, design the bag so that it attaches securely, i.e. it doesn't sway back and forth under the seat.
    Yes, our clip is tool-less installation and attached securely without the bag swaying back and forth. I think you will like what you see eventually

  3. #28
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    No velcro, please. After ruining a pair of bibs, I cut all the velcro from my saddle bags.

    Another thing, the weight of the bag shouldn't put strain on the closure (zipper). I've had horizontal zippers fail in the past (attached to mountain bike with heavier load), so the vertical closure zipper of the Topeak Aero Wedge makes sense. http://https://www.amazon.com/Topeak.../dp/B003UWI16K, with the front velcro cut off. It also has reflector and a strap for attaching light.

    The essential for me is to be able to fit the cell phone (galaxy S7 style), I do not want phone in my jersey. I can just fit phone, airstik pump, a spare tube, car key and a couple of allen keys in the topeak medium, but it does have a few unsightly bulges.

    Intrigued by the new Topeak line on their website, saw this when looking for a link to the old aero wedge. Wonder if anyone has used this...

    https://www.topeak.com/global/en/pro.../686-dynawedge

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjc View Post
    The essential for me is to be able to fit the cell phone (galaxy S7 style), I do not want phone in my jersey. I can just fit phone, airstik pump, a spare tube, car key and a couple of allen keys in the topeak medium, but it does have a few unsightly bulges.

    Intrigued by the new Topeak line on their website, saw this when looking for a link to the old aero wedge. Wonder if anyone has used this...

    https://www.topeak.com/global/en/pro.../686-dynawedge
    That's the problem. If you want a huge cell phone to fit in the bag, the bag will be huge. I have no interest in a big bag. But, you do. One bag can't do both.

    WRT the Topeak: The velcro strap thing that doesn't wrap all the way around the bag will fail.

  5. #30
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    Yeah, most tires I can pull off with my hands. Some are tight fitting (wire bead) and I can't get them off withour tire levers, especially on a cold winter day...

  6. #31
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    I either use a separate gear/tool pouch the shape/size of a jersey pocket, or a saddlebag with a quick-disconnect (Fizik). i like to be able to have the pouch/bag off the bike when working on the bike. Holding the bike up - especially if a wheel is off - while digging through the saddlebag is a (first world) pain in the ass.

  7. #32
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    You are in the right track for sure.
    Styling does matter because people not worried about style will be purely price point shopping and get the cheapest Nashbar saddle suitcase they can find.

    Iíd add no Velcro strap to the seat post as a requirement. Tight and not wobbly. Waterproof would be very nice too. I love my Silca but if you made a similar one that is waterproof....

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjc View Post
    After ruining a pair of bibs, I cut all the velcro from my saddle bags.
    How did that happen?
    Insert something clever here:

    Insert list of every bike I own here:

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanE View Post
    How did that happen?
    Inner thighs can rub the velcro strap that wraps the seat tube.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcb View Post
    Not sure who needs tire leverS? Usually you don't need any but on rare occasions 1 will do.
    I've changed more tires than god. Plastic tire levers are small and light. i always carry two.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by survivor82 View Post
    For #3, maybe I am biased but our clip design works great too. Maybe once we finalized the design we can win you over from the Velcro camp

    I have seen request for keys holder several times and we will take it into consideration when we finalized our design. Thanks for the great inputs.
    Velcro allows more flexibility to locate and secure the bag, not a fan of clips.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldZaskar View Post
    Inner thighs can rub the velcro strap that wraps the seat tube.
    Have you thought about cutting the Velcro to the perfect length to avoid hook and loop damage to Assos?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The internet is a little like a bar, a wonderful place where we can bullsh(t our past, but it also, is full of reasonably reliable sources of information to be used as ammo to call "bullish)t."

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldZaskar View Post
    Inner thighs can rub the velcro strap that wraps the seat tube.
    That's why we have specifically worked on our design to avoid the inner thighs rubbing as well as getting rid of Velcro in our solution.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjc View Post
    The essential for me is to be able to fit the cell phone (galaxy S7 style), I do not want phone in my jersey. I can just fit phone, airstik pump, a spare tube, car key and a couple of allen keys in the topeak medium, but it does have a few unsightly bulges.
    Our team have discussed about whether our solution can support cell phone storage. Ultimately we have decided that with the increasing phone sizes, there is no way for us to support cell phone storage while maintaining the compactness of the saddle bag. We are trying to strike the balance between storage capability vs size and unfortunately cell phones like iPhone plus or Galaxy is just too big for the bag to handle.

  15. #40
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    1. Compact enough to carry most of your essential items. Think 2 spare tubes, 2 tire levers, 2 CO2 canisters, Multitools with chain tool, patch kit, all these in a compact form factor.

    That what I carry except I have an pump on my down tube. No CO2.

    2. Stylish enough to not ruin your bike aesthetic, this can be quite subjective and personal but assume it meets your styling requirement.

    Ok good.

    3. Quick attach and release. Much faster than dealing with Velcro.

    I have a bag for each bike and donít want to attach something to attach the bag to. Velcro works great for saddle rails but NOT for attaching to seat post. That needs to be an elastic cord or something similar.

    4. Abundant styling/color choices.

    That may be a good selling point.

    PS - Iím not sure why people who donít use a seat bag would reply to this thread. Thatís your choice and I respect that, but my saddle bags arenít ďclunkyĒ and my jersey pockets remain available for food, warmers I take off during the ride, my phone, cycling wallet, etc. Thatís MY personal choice and why I replied to add input on an item I actually use.

  16. #41
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    I have 3 different bikes that I do most of my riding on, and each has a different bag, to go with the different uses of each bike.

    Bike #1; Long-distance everyday road bike: Sometimes I need to carry my wallet, as well as the usual spare and my phone, my cleat covers, and possibly a place to keep an extra layer. For this, a handlebar bag on a solid mount does the job. Bike has a second bottle mount, where I can keep a comprehensive zip-open tool kit.

    Bike #2; Classic/retro road bike: An expandable under-saddle bag, so if I need to carry extra stuff, it will open up enough to just barely cover it. Also, easy to remove when I want to go 'minimal', and just mount a spare tubular clip on it.

    Bike #3; my rail-trail bike (old touring frame with 38mm tires): On this bike, a small top-tube bag behind the stem holds a spare tube and my cleat covers. Tool kit goes on a bottle cage, wallet in my pockets.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjdhawkhill View Post
    Waterproof is overrated.... good tools wonít rust after a rainy ride or three
    They will however rust after 2 or 3 years worth of rainy rides:

    I recently replaced the saddle bag on my commuter bike (because the old one finally -- and literally -- disintegrated) and one of the features I was adamant about having on the replacement bag was waterproof-ness. Because I have gone through three multitools in the past 8-9 years. They all rusted as a result of living in that non-waterproof bag on my commuter bike, which sees a decent -- though not excessive -- amount of rain. And yes, it does have a rear fender.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notvintage View Post
    Saddle bags are for 'tards. Jersey pockets is all you need less you're touring.
    Jersey pockets are for my lip balm, food and phone. Under-the-saddle bags are for the flat repair kit...

    I use an old Jandd tubular tire bag. It is large enough to hold a patch kit, tire levers, two tubes, CO2 inflator and mini pump (Murphy rules my life so if I have only CO2 I will have more flats than cartridges - same with tubes). I like the tire sock because it is narrow so my thighs don't touch it and it stays in place without swaying.

    On long rides and in bad weather I use an Arkel Randonneur rack with a trunk bag (so as to carry extra raingear or incidentals), so a bag that has a semi-permanent clip attached to the rails is a non-starter for me. Solidly made velcro straps are just fine.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  19. #44
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    I gave all my saddle bags away and now use the water bottle cage to carry a storage container.

    much easier to access.

    if i need more water i'll carry a bottle or three in my jersey pocket.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    I gave all my saddle bags away and now use the water bottle cage to carry a storage container.

    much easier to access.

    if i need more water i'll carry a bottle or three in my jersey pocket.
    I have to say that to me this makes no sense. A bottle in your pocket will warm up faster than on the bike and the shape isn't all that comfortable back there. It is one thing for a domestique to carry bottles like like to their teammates, but something else entirely to carry one all day in your jersey pocket.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    I gave all my saddle bags away and now use the water bottle cage to carry a storage container.

    much easier to access.

    if i need more water i'll carry a bottle or three in my jersey pocket.
    Thank you for your feedback. Everyone has their own preferences. Hopefully our solution will be able to sway you back into the saddle bag camp.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
    They will however rust after 2 or 3 years worth of rainy rides:

    I recently replaced the saddle bag on my commuter bike (because the old one finally -- and literally -- disintegrated) and one of the features I was adamant about having on the replacement bag was waterproof-ness. Because I have gone through three multitools in the past 8-9 years. They all rusted as a result of living in that non-waterproof bag on my commuter bike, which sees a decent -- though not excessive -- amount of rain. And yes, it does have a rear fender.
    Just trying to understand the expectation of water proofing performance of saddle bag. Does it need to be water resistant or water proof? By water resistant I mean your tools will stay dry when you ride in raining days and perhaps occasional heavy down pour. Water proof means you can throw the saddle bag into the river, it remains submerged for extended period of time and your tools still remain dry. We definitely designed our solution to be water resistant but there are challenges for water proofing the solution.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradkay View Post
    A bottle in your pocket will warm up faster than on the bike
    This is a dead fallacy. Three frozen water bottles on a hot day on pavement or gravel, the one coldest longest is the one in the jersey pocket.

    The rest I pretty much agree with.

    I donít like carrying more than one on my back cause that much weight really does change the fit of the clothing.


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    The internet is a little like a bar, a wonderful place where we can bullsh(t our past, but it also, is full of reasonably reliable sources of information to be used as ammo to call "bullish)t."

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Ross View Post
    They will however rust after 2 or 3 years worth of rainy rides:

    I recently replaced the saddle bag on my commuter bike (because the old one finally -- and literally -- disintegrated) and one of the features I was adamant about having on the replacement bag was waterproof-ness. Because I have gone through three multitools in the past 8-9 years. They all rusted as a result of living in that non-waterproof bag on my commuter bike, which sees a decent -- though not excessive -- amount of rain. And yes, it does have a rear fender.
    Maybe thatís where indoor bike parking really has saved me- and being a part time fair weather commuter. Everything has a chance to dry out during the day or overnight. Iíve got three bikes in active rotation, the oldest over 10 years of gravel and grit and havenít had to replace a tool because of rust.

    To each his own, Iím not a fenders or die person- Iím more shower and change at work- if it rains youíre getting wet, and your bike is getting dirty. And fenders and gravel was never a good combination.


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    The internet is a little like a bar, a wonderful place where we can bullsh(t our past, but it also, is full of reasonably reliable sources of information to be used as ammo to call "bullish)t."

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by survivor82 View Post
    Thank you for your feedback. Everyone has their own preferences. Hopefully our solution will be able to sway you back into the saddle bag camp.
    hard to re-invent the wheel but good luck in your efforts.

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