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  1. #26
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    Get it, I bet you'll love it.

    High quality endurance frame with rim brakes almost impossible to get in USA now... even if companies have a model they sell elsewhere like Europe, many aren't selling them in US to force the disc brake issue.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    Yeah, I could just go 105 and then the price would drop $300 to $2900. I was just thinking, if I am gonna go whole hog, might as well swallow the whale & pony up to get Ultegra for the first time since the early 2000s (I too have 105 on every other bike, and have never had a problem with it).

    One thing that confuses me about the specs on this Bianchi is this: it's a carbon frame, and I am finally convincing myself to shutup and get a carbon frame, yet the seatpost I would be sitting on is an "alloy" seatpost. Plus, it's 31.6mm diameter! True a##-buster!! I thought my tush, for once, would be sitting on all carbon, as in both carbon frame and carbon post? I realize they're trying to save money and such, but geeezlousie Bianchi, give a guy a carbon post and don't make him drop $100-$200 to get one after he buys it

    i've had carbon seat posts and alloy seat posts on various bikes. I never noticed a bit of difference.

  3. #28
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    Not sure if this is Fugly or not but it does cost a heap less than the Italian brands Bianchi and Pinna.
    wiggle.com | Eastway Emitter R1 (Ultegra Di2) Road Bike Black/Multi 58c | Road Bikes - Race

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwisimon View Post
    Not sure if this is Fugly or not but it does cost a heap less than the Italian brands Bianchi and Pinna.
    wiggle.com | Eastway Emitter R1 (Ultegra Di2) Road Bike Black/Multi 58c | Road Bikes - Race
    From what I see, the Eastway (whoever they are) Zener D1 Ultegra model goes for $2,400. The similar Bianchi Ultegra model goes for $2,600. Even though the Bianchi doesn't have an Ultegra crankset, I would still rather spend the extra $200 for a known quality brand rather than take a chance on off-brand carbon.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  5. #30
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    I would caution you that the Intenso is the exception when it comes to Bianchi and threaded bottom brackets. Their higher models, all road racing frames are all press fit.

    I have one, a 2014 Shimano 105 model in gloss Ferarri red. The Fulcrum Racing Sport wheelset that they spec are throw aways, though. The cassette freehub in particular doesn't handle the elements well at all. Dealer was kind enough to swap out for some Racing 3s with a way better rep.

    Not sure why they spec non-series Shimano or FSA cranks on an Ultegra or 105 model. I will say that the combination of the threaded shell, Shimano BB and Shimano crank is the nicest (easiest) I've worked on.

  6. #31
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    Supposedly the Intenso was the old Infinito before they went countervail.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by GKSki View Post
    Supposedly the Intenso was the old Infinito before they went countervail.
    Hi GKSki,

    Well, last night when ruminating about this Bianchi Intenso, I had emailed two of the quite big Flandrian clubs I sometimes ride with. A total of 7 people got back to me this morning, all owning Intensos. Two have 2016 versions, 4 with 2017 versions, and 1 with a quite new 2018 version. I don't know a nice way to say this, but I was shocked with the negative feedback. None of them knew the others were emailing me, which leads me to worry even more. Every one of them identified the exact same problem: they have had and are still having fork issues, specifically the steerer tube is made way to weak, and despite being back to the Bianchi dealer trying to sort this out (and several having new forks put in), they are still having issues. The steerer, they said, is continually moving in the wrong plane (back and forth), among other things, to where it feels like the whole fork is loose. This supposedly is true no matter how well the fork is set up, tightened, etc. It begins to happen within several rides.

    I then did a general Google search and came upon this RBR thread where you posted a lot:

    Bianchi Carbon Fork Warning

    But this was concerning possible catastrophic failure, right?

    Next, I went into Google.it (Italy) and I found threads, current, with people discussing the same thing, and also the back & forth fork movement problem noted by others above.


    Man, I have to tell ya, I am seriously turned off right now about Bianchi. Your thread from alone from last year is enough to give me pause. But hearing similar complaints from current Intenso owners? What the heck is going on with Bianchi? I know all nearly all carbon bikes/forks are made in the same Chinese/Taiwan factory suppliers (that build all the other major brands carbon bikes). so I am at a loss why Bianchi seems to be struggling with this.

    Dang, it figures that the one carbon bike that still has rim brakes and a good ole' threaded bottom bracket, all with Shimano 105 and/or Ultegra stuff has to pop up with enough of a problem to give me pause/worry. I understand nothing manufactured is error free, but when they want me to drop >$3000 on a bike, I expect at the least any problems with the frame and/or forks to be totally ironed out.


    Well, gang, it thus looks like the search continues. Also is looking like I may have to give up the rim-brake-only dream and allow "disc brakes" into my parameters. Doing so sure opens up a whole other world in terms of possible bikes available. Just wish I didn't hate them so, lol. Have too many friends that currently have disc brakes on some of thier road machines and the problem is they don't take care of them (maintain the disc setup like they should) and thus their brakes stink compared to my plugin & forget Ultegra rim brakes with orange Koolstop all-weather pads. So, I may have to ignore that & just swallow and accept I've got another bike maintenance issue (disc brakes) to worry about.

  8. #33
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    Also consider Ribble. They have their own in-house designed brand (made in Taiwan I'm sure like everything else). A friend of mine has one (albeit Alum) but he's really pleased with the price/quality.

    They have a bunch of Rim/Carbon options. The Grand Fondo is pretty sharp and a 105 Build is under $1500 USD. An Ultegra Build is under $1800. You can custom spec/upgrade any component (if you really want that carbon seatpost )
    www.ribblecycles.co.uk/bikes/road-bikes/?brakes%5B0%5D=No+Disc&material%5B0%5D=Carbon

    And sponsor a pro race team
    Ribble Pro Cycling
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  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    Hi GKSki,

    Well, last night when ruminating about this Bianchi Intenso, I had emailed two of the quite big Flandrian clubs I sometimes ride with. A total of 7 people got back to me this morning, all owning Intensos. Two have 2016 versions, 4 with 2017 versions, and 1 with a quite new 2018 version. I don't know a nice way to say this, but I was shocked with the negative feedback. None of them knew the others were emailing me, which leads me to worry even more. Every one of them identified the exact same problem: they have had and are still having fork issues, specifically the steerer tube is made way to weak, and despite being back to the Bianchi dealer trying to sort this out (and several having new forks put in), they are still having issues. The steerer, they said, is continually moving in the wrong plane (back and forth), among other things, to where it feels like the whole fork is loose. This supposedly is true no matter how well the fork is set up, tightened, etc. It begins to happen within several rides.

    I then did a general Google search and came upon this RBR thread where you posted a lot:

    Bianchi Carbon Fork Warning

    But this was concerning possible catastrophic failure, right?

    Next, I went into Google.it (Italy) and I found threads, current, with people discussing the same thing, and also the back & forth fork movement problem noted by others above.


    Man, I have to tell ya, I am seriously turned off right now about Bianchi. Your thread from alone from last year is enough to give me pause. But hearing similar complaints from current Intenso owners? What the heck is going on with Bianchi? I know all nearly all carbon bikes/forks are made in the same Chinese/Taiwan factory suppliers (that build all the other major brands carbon bikes). so I am at a loss why Bianchi seems to be struggling with this.

    Dang, it figures that the one carbon bike that still has rim brakes and a good ole' threaded bottom bracket, all with Shimano 105 and/or Ultegra stuff has to pop up with enough of a problem to give me pause/worry. I understand nothing manufactured is error free, but when they want me to drop >$3000 on a bike, I expect at the least any problems with the frame and/or forks to be totally ironed out.
    YIKES! At this point, I would not walk away from Bianchi, I would RUN away! Design defects are one thing, but this is a defect that could spell GAME OVER.

    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    Well, gang, it thus looks like the search continues. Also is looking like I may have to give up the rim-brake-only dream and allow "disc brakes" into my parameters.
    Or keep rim brakes and allow a press-fit BB into your parameters. I'm not a fan of them, but I don't consider them the kiss of death either if the bike checks all the other boxes I want.

    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    Doing so sure opens up a whole other world in terms of possible bikes available. Just wish I didn't hate them so, lol.
    Hate is a very strong word. They really aren't that bad. IMO, there are excellent disc brakes and crappy disc brakes as well as excellent rim brakes and crappy rim brakes. The passion of one over the other on these forums can be mildly entertaining, but gets really boring after awhile.

    So, if you do decide to break down and get a bike with disc brakes, make sure they are hydraulic, not mechanical. I have Shimano RS505 dsic brakes on my gravel bike and they are actually pretty nice. There is a learning curve for sure, but once you learn the idiosyncrasies, you will wonder what all the fuss was about. Just remember this - Ignorance breeds fear. Fear breeds hatred.

    Would I buy a bike just because it has disc brakes? Absolutely not. But I would not avoid a bike because it has disc brakes either.


    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    Have too many friends that currently have disc brakes on some of thier road machines and the problem is they don't take care of them (maintain the disc setup like they should) and thus their brakes stink compared to my plugin & forget Ultegra rim brakes with orange Koolstop all-weather pads. So, I may have to ignore that & just swallow and accept I've got another bike maintenance issue (disc brakes) to worry about.
    It's really not that big a deal. Yes, you should bleed the system every 2 or 3 years. But also keep in mind that hydraulic disc brakes (just like the ones on your car) are self-adjusting. That is, unlike rim brakes or mechanical discs, they will automatically adjust the clearance for pad wear. So that is one less maintenance item there.

    One advantage of disc brakes is the ability to change rim size. I am now in the process of building a 650b wheelset for my gravel bike because I want to be able to use wider tires. My original setup is 700c wheels and 36mm tires. I can fit up to 40mm tires. If I go to a 650b wheelset, I will be able to fit 47mm tires for the really rough stuff.

    There are trade-offs for sure. You must be very careful not to pull the brake lever when your tire is not in or you will "re-adjust" the brake as if there is no disc. So when you put the wheel back in, the brake will rub. Discs also add a little weight, so if you're a gram counter, discs aren't for you. Some discs can overheat on long desents, but braking technique can generally get past this issue. I have yet to experience brake fade.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Also consider Ribble. They have their own in-house designed brand (made in Taiwan I'm sure like everything else). A friend of mine has one (albeit Alum) but he's really pleased with the price/quality.

    They have a bunch of Rim/Carbon options. The Grand Fondo is pretty sharp and a 105 Build is under $1500 USD. An Ultegra Build is under $1800. You can custom spec/upgrade any component (if you really want that carbon seatpost )
    www.ribblecycles.co.uk/bikes/road-bikes/?brakes%5B0%5D=No+Disc&material%5B0%5D=Carbon

    And sponsor a pro race team
    Ribble Pro Cycling
    If it sounds too good to be true..................................
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    If it sounds too good to be true..................................
    It's not. Ribble is a reputable company.
    I've bought many things from them. And know others who have. And like I said, a friend has one of their bikes.

    Edit: Not only true, but well reviewed
    Review: Ribble Gran Fondo Disc | road.cc
    Ribble Gran Fondo Disc review - Cycling Weekly
    https://www.bikeradar.com/us/gear/ca...ndo-210-39756/
    Last edited by tlg; 05-17-2018 at 06:27 AM.
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  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    It's not. Ribble is a reputable company.
    I've bought many things from them. And know others who have. And like I said, a friend has one of their bikes.
    ....

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Kiwi discovered that Bianchi still uses threaded BBs on their carbon bikes.
    Yeah, but the Pinarello would be a cooler rain bike.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Yeah, but the Pinarello would be a cooler rain bike.
    Just be sure it's a Pinarello and not a Ch.......oh, never mind!
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    If it sounds too good to be true..................................
    I think it isn't too good to be true. If it's made in Taiwan, its most likely made by Giant who make a lot of brand name bikes. Ribble bikes get good reviews. I've bought a bunch of stuff from them (not a bike though) and always been really pleased with the prices and customer service. Stuff comes in less than a week. I wouldn't hesitate to buy a bike from Ribble.

  16. #41
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    Thanks, TLG, for the Ribble suggestion.

    I am on the site right now, looking at the 105 version and playing with upgrading the wheels and tyres. The bike isn't ugly, has rim brakes, is carbon, and the ability to customize is nice.

    But then I chose the wheelset, and when I went to choose a tyre size, it only offered 700x23, and 700x25 in Conti GP4000s II. Suspicious, I asked, and it seems 700x28 rubber doesn't fit on this Ribble frame. The only max size they'll guarantee is 700x25. Well, this is a deal killer. I only ride/race now on Conti GP4000s II in 700x28, which also happen to be the biggest 700x28 tyres on the market when put on any rim, and am also waiting for the new Rubinos 700x28 to arrive that I ordered.

    So, no 700x28 on the Ribble Gran Fondo.

    What a crapper



    The hunt continues
    ................................

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    Hi GKSki,

    Well, last night when ruminating about this Bianchi Intenso,


    Man, I have to tell ya, I am seriously turned off right now about Bianchi.

    Well, gang, it thus looks like the search continues. .
    I have had two PF frames with adapters (1) Praxis (2) KCNC. Never had any issues with either. If you hate discs just get a good bike with press fit and use the adapter if you have problems
    https://www.canyon.com/en/road/endurace/cf/

    Sorry for the bum steer on the Bianchi.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    But then I chose the wheelset, and when I went to choose a tyre size, it only offered 700x23, and 700x25 in Conti GP4000s II. Suspicious, I asked, and it seems 700x28 rubber doesn't fit on this Ribble frame. The only max size they'll guarantee is 700x25. Well, this is a deal killer. I only ride/race now on Conti GP4000s II in 700x28, which also happen to be the biggest 700x28 tyres on the market when put on any rim, and am also waiting for the new Rubinos 700x28 to arrive that I ordered.
    Well that's a bummer. I can see why that'd be a deal breaker, especially on an endurance bike.
    They've got 2 other endurance models. Sportive & EVO. I just looked and both say clearance for 25mm
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  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwisimon View Post
    I have had two PF frames with adapters (1) Praxis (2) KCNC. Never had any issues with either. If you hate discs just get a good bike with press fit and use the adapter if you have problems
    https://www.canyon.com/en/road/endurace/cf/

    Sorry for the bum steer on the Bianchi.

    Wow, this is getting freaky with you, Kiwi? Are you my wife and I don't know it? Reason is she just sent me an email and said she thinks I ought to get this in colour 'stormgreen':

    https://www.canyon.com/en-be/road/en...-disc-7-0.html


    Honey, is that you???



    [Edit: shoot, the Canyon is both "pressfit" and "disc" brakes, lol...well, at least she tried, bless her heart]

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    Wow, this is getting freaky with you, Kiwi? Are you my wife and I don't know it? Reason is she just sent me an email and said she thinks I ought to get this in colour 'stormgreen':

    https://www.canyon.com/en-be/road/en...-disc-7-0.html


    Honey, is that you???



    [Edit: shoot, the Canyon is both "pressfit" and "disc" brakes, lol...well, at least she tried, bless her heart]
    Check the link again. They have a rim brake version.
    https://www.canyon.com/en-be/road/endurace/cf/
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  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Check the link again. They have a rim brake version.
    https://www.canyon.com/en-be/road/endurace/cf/
    ok, yeah, I see it now (thanks) the two other ones with rims brakes.

    Wow, that Canyon ENDURACE CF 8.0 with Ultegra, I'd get full on Ultegra shifters, Ultegra derailleurs,(F&R), Ultegra brakes, Ultegra cranks, plus DT SWiss P1800 rims amd a carbon seatpost----all for under 1900 euros (about $2250). Dang, that's impressive. Nearly all the other carbons I've looked at that had/have any sort of Ultgera on them have been closer to $3000.

    Hmmm, black or the cyan/silver.....whatever happen to colours??.........

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    ok, yeah, I see it now (thanks) the two other ones with rims brakes.

    Wow, that Canyon ENDURACE CF 8.0 with Ultegra, I'd get full on Ultegra shifters, Ultegra derailleurs,(F&R), Ultegra cranks, plus DT SWiss P1800 rims amd a carbon seatpost----all for under 1900 euros (about $2250). Dang, that's impressive. Nearly all the other carbons I've looked at that had/have any sort of Ultgera on them have been closer to $3000.

    Hmmm, black or the cyan/silver.....whatever happen to colours??.........
    Looks like it comes with 25mm tires. Might want to check on 28 clearance.
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  23. #48
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    700x25 GP 4000 is a pretty big tire. Contis run kind of large. Frankly, I've always been fine with 700x23. I don't ride on cobble stones or any rough surfaces.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Looks like it comes with 25mm tires. Might want to check on 28 clearance.
    I'm punching their "LiveChat" button, but got a message that says they're gone for the day (it's 6:30pm here). Guess I'll have to check tomorrow morning. Even though they are mail order, bright side is their huge Europe build & maintenance center is only about 55-60 minutes away from me. It's located near Leuven, BE, at the edge of the Flandrian/Wallonia heartland's dividing line (in fact, the line that divides this whole crazy country, lol).

    Thanks again, tlg!

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    I'm punching their "LiveChat" button, but got a message that says they're gone for the day (it's 6:30pm here). Guess I'll have to check tomorrow morning. Even though they are mail order, bright side is their huge Europe build & maintenance center is only about 55-60 minutes away from me. It's located near Leuven, BE, at the edge of the Flandrian/Wallonia heartland's dividing line (in fact, the line that divides this whole crazy country, lol).

    Thanks again, tlg!
    This review is from 2015 and says there's clearance for 28's. I'd imagine the newer models are too.
    Review: Canyon Endurace CF 8.0 road bike | road.cc
    Speaking of tyres the Endurace comes with 25mm Conti Grand Prix 4000s though these are stretched out to 27mm thanks to the wide rim profile of the DT Swiss R24 Spline wheels to give a balance of comfort and grip without the added weight of going for a bigger volume tyre.

    Your fingers aren't aching at the bottom of a technical, wet descent from having to haul on the brakes for every single bend. The fact that the new calipers also take up to 28mm wide tyres means they're a perfect match for the frameset's clearance.
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