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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Want to buy a Urban and Road Bike - Need help!

    Hi All. I'm in the market for (2) new bikes. Currently I'm riding a GF Mako MTB. It's a basic model and a decent bike, but want to move up. I've got the cash and want to buy
    (2) more bikes. My main use for these bikes is: exercise, riding on paved paths and city streets and commuting to and from my office which is about 8 miles round trip. I got back into riding this past summer to lose some weight and I just love it... I have a budget of up to $1000 for each bike so $2,000 total give or take. I want something with a good reputation, and components. I'm 5'6" - 250lbs. For an urban bike, I was thinking of Trek's Soho S or Valencia or GF Katai. Any others in this segment you all like? How about road bikes? I'm very new to them. so please "educate me". Lastly is there an on-line store you all buy accesories from?

    Thanks - JP

  2. #2
    Burnum Upus Quadricepus
    Reputation: brucew's Avatar
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    Are you sure you need two? Many people use one bike for those two purposes. A cyclocross bike is an excellent starting point. Besides, with your budget you can get two so-so bikes, or one really great bike and change back.

    Since you seem to shop at a Trek store, look at the Trek Portland to see what I mean. I own the '06 model. I can't say I recommend the current model. It's still a great frameset, but they've cheapened the brakes and drivetrain without reducing the price. But conceptually, that's the sort of place to start.

    I've added a rack and lights to mine, and since I ride in all conditions, I took off the cute fenderettes and use real full fenders. Yeah, they used to laugh at me when I'd show up for a club ride on a bike with lights, rack and fenders, but then they found I could hang with the fast group, and take a turn or two at the front.

    Starting with any cyclocross bike, you can customize it in the direction you prefer, and still have something that's great on the open road and in the city. The extra budget on good components will be well-spent.

  3. #3
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    Completely agree with Bruce. Your two proposed uses aren't different enough to warrant two separate bikes. My only concern is where the bike will be parked on your commute. If out in the open, it might be worth it to get two bikes, a cheap and I mean cheap beater and a nicer more versatile offering, like a cyclocross bike.

  4. #4
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    Two bikes makes sence but I'd split the $2000 more like $200 and $1800.

    There's not much in favor of having a good bike for a 4 miles urban commute but plenty of reasons for using a junker. Tops on the list are theft, vandalism, and leaving it locked up in the rain all day some days.

    Then if you want a road bike you can get a pretty nice one and be able to treat it and use it as they should be.

    But if you never plan on getting out into the burbs or country where a road bike shines and will stay in the city a cyclocross or a hybrid might be a good idea for the second, or only bike.

    Purpose wise I'd agree you don't need two if you plan on staying in the city but for the comfort of being able to not care about the bike you'll leave on the steet all day when working it is worth having a second junker in my opinion.


    edit: Actually I'd probably keep the bike you have for the 4 mile commute and spend it all, or a portion, on another bike for your non cummuting needs...whatever those turn out to be.
    Last edited by Hank Stamper; 11-19-2009 at 10:43 AM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hank Stamper
    Two bikes makes sence but I'd split the $2000 more like $200 and $1800.
    Agreed, this is exactly what I did. Spent $80 on craigslist for an old steel Raleigh, removed the front derailleur and put fenders, puncture-resistant tires, and lights on it as my beater/commuter/foul-weather bike. Of course, when the weather's nice I ride my $1400 Neuvation to work -- and keep it in my office

    Asad

  6. #6
    Avid indoorsman
    Reputation: Kurious Oranj's Avatar
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    You can get a very decent new commuter bike for $500 - $600 such as Trek 7.2 or 7.3 FX or Kona Dew and spend the rest on a new entry level cyclocross bike or a good used road bike. I bought a Trek 7.3 FX strictly for commuting and I am pretty happy with it and so far, no one has stolen it... I have ridden it most days for the last 18 months and all I have had to do for maintenance is to change the chain, brake pads etc.
    Those are my principles. If you don't like them I have others.
    -- Groucho Marx

  7. #7
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    Yeah I am definitely a fan of splitting the money and getting two bikes, and I definitely favor the three to one split minimum for the road bike(500 on commuter bike, 1500 road bike). That way you get a decent commuter and good quality road bike.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the replies everyone. Can you some clarify for me what the difference is between a cyclocross vs. a road bike is? sorry for the dumb question.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtelli71
    Thanks for the replies everyone. Can you some clarify for me what the difference is between a cyclocross vs. a road bike is? sorry for the dumb question.
    A cross bike, in its purest form is designed to race cyclocross, which is off-road riding through mud, grass, gravel, sand, etc. and requires the rider to dismount on occassion and carry the bike over/up obstacles. They use cantilever brakes and have clearance for wider more aggressively treaded tires.

    They are quickly becoming the jack-of-all-trades bike. Unlike modern road bikes, they have clearance for fatter more comfortable tires, typically have a more upright rider position, which some find more comfortable and are usually built with a bit more abuse in mind. I can easily throw a pair of skinny road tires on my corss bike and go out for a road ride or throw some bigger knobbies on there and do some light off-road trails riding.

    Modern road bikes for the most part are built for one thing, speed. More aerodynamic rider position and usually mych tighter wheel/tire clearances, so you are limited to skinny tires.

    There are other differences, but that is the cliff's notes version.

  10. #10
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    What he said... I wish I had purchased a cylocross bike. More versatile than the road bike I currently use to get to work. I will be using a mountain bike this winter for commuting - but wish I had a cyclocross bike that accepted winter tires.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthonytn8 View Post
    Hi I'm you are interested I have a 2011 Scott cr1 comp small frame 51.5c. It's a full carbon Frame, forks, and seat post. It has upgraded components. Shimano ultegra shifters, deore derailers and a 105 crank. I bought it brand new at the beginning Of last year and never rose it. It is bran new and I need the money for bills. I'm looking to get about $1400 for it. Text or call me if you are interested. 3172582447

    Anthony
    You replied to a post that is almost 3 years old. I'm sure the OP has his bike by now. I would also edit your post and delete your number, unless you don't mind being prank called, not by me, but by other's who read this thread.
    - Ed

    2012 Trek Madone 6.7 SSL
    2013 Specialized Tricross Comp disc
    2011 Trek Top Fuel 9.9 SSL
    2012 Salsa Mukluk 2

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ecub View Post
    You replied to a post that is almost 3 years old. I'm sure the OP has his bike by now. I would also edit your post and delete your number, unless you don't mind being prank called, not by me, but by other's who read this thread.
    I think since you quoted him he wouldnt be able to delete his number if he wanted to.....Lolz

    I

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