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  1. #1
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    What should I have done on my bike with 2500-3000 miles on it?

    I have a Trek 1.2 and consider myself a newer cyclist. I have been riding for a 1 1/2 years and have 2500-3000 miles on my Trek. I have had no shop maintenance done to it. So at this point what should I have done to my bike? And how much should I pay for that maintenance. I have a Trek but it seems like everything is high priced! I have an REI store nearby, I'm just not sure if I should take my Trek there.

    Also, I think I need tires (2500-3000 miles on them). Where is the best place to get tires (online), and what brand?

    Thanks for any suggestions on my questions.

    Jim

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Mazzulla View Post
    I have a Trek 1.2 and consider myself a newer cyclist. I have been riding for a 1 1/2 years and have 2500-3000 miles on my Trek. I have had no shop maintenance done to it. So at this point what should I have done to my bike? And how much should I pay for that maintenance. I have a Trek but it seems like everything is high priced! I have an REI store nearby, I'm just not sure if I should take my Trek there.

    Also, I think I need tires (2500-3000 miles on them). Where is the best place to get tires (online), and what brand?

    Thanks for any suggestions on my questions.

    Jim
    chain is probably done. tires depends on which ones but likely as well. how are the break pads looking?
    Blows your hair back.

  3. #3
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    Hopefully you've been cleaning and lubing the chain and derailleur components. I don't bring my bike to a shop unless there's something wrong that I can't fix.

    Your front tire is probably fine. They don't need replacement unless there is obvious wear.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by den bakker View Post
    chain is probably done. tires depends on which ones but likely as well. how are the break pads looking?
    Really? I get way more miles than that on my chains.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonB176 View Post
    Really? I get way more miles than that on my chains.
    a ruler will tell for this particular chain
    Blows your hair back.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonB176 View Post
    Really? I get way more miles than that on my chains.
    Sounds about right to me. I replace the chain every 3-4K miles which translates to once a season in this case.
    The OP needs to take the bike to a shop since he can't tell if the tires are worn or not - nothing wrong with that, BTW. A full tune-up with cleaning goes for $100-150 around here (NJ) assuming nothing major needs to be replaced.
    My other chainring is a 39...
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  7. #7
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    Yes, new tires, chain and adjust the brakes. I would go to a local bike shop where people will give you advice on all of these questions. Bikes, Cycling Clothing, Bike Parts & Cycling Gear: Bike Discounts & Deals from Nashbar always has some great deals on bicycle tires.
    With people like Peter P. around, I am done posting on this website. Mean people have driven me off after 9 plus years. Good luck newbies beware.

  8. #8
    Not a rocket surgeon.
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    I love this, replace this, replace that. None of us have even seen the bike.

    Idea Get it checked out by someone you trust. Replace what is bad and ride it.

  9. #9
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    I clean and lube on a regular basis. Interestingly, my back tire is only a little more worn than front. I heard the back usually wears a lot quicker. I think the tires like fine, but they are slick.

  10. #10
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    I'll bring it in and have them look at it, just don't know who to trust yet. Also break pads are worn some but I'm really surprised their not more worn.

  11. #11
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    Spring bicycle inspection

    I just saw this and it may be worth reading.

    Off The Beaten Path | News from Bicycle Quarterly and Compass Bicycles

  12. #12
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    Re: What should I have done on my bike with 2500-3000 miles on it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Mazzulla View Post
    I'll bring it in and have them look at it, just don't know who to trust yet. Also break pads are worn some but I'm really surprised their not more worn.
    Where did you buy it?
    Do you do any group rides?

  13. #13
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    You really need a tune-up once a year. I usually can get a full year out of my chain (4000-5000 miles) When you get a new chain, you’ll probably want a new cassette at the same time. Your bike shop will probably recommend it.

    However, with the mileage you’re doing, you can probably go 2 years between tune-ups.

    Yes, they can be a little pricey, but most bike shops have tune-up specials in the late winter/early spring. (my LBS runs a special every March)

    RE: Tire question. There are tons out there. It depends on your riding style. Since you’re a recreational rider (I’m guessing you are), you don’t want to buy a racing tire. So you don't need to worry about weight. I’d recommend Continental Gatorskins for you. A tough, high mileage road tire. A little pricey, but well worth the money IMO. Remember, you get what you pay for. I buy my tires off Amazon, but that’s just me.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Mazzulla View Post
    I clean and lube on a regular basis. Interestingly, my back tire is only a little more worn than front. I heard the back usually wears a lot quicker. I think the tires like fine, but they are slick.
    The rear tire usually squares off when it's worn but it depends on the type.
    My other chainring is a 39...
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  15. #15
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by marhot View Post
    You really need a tune-up once a year. I usually can get a full year out of my chain (4000-5000 miles) When you get a new chain, you’ll probably want a new cassette at the same time. Your bike shop will probably recommend it.
    That's an expensive way of doing it. If you replace your chain when required, rather than yearly, there's no reason at all to replace your cassette. With a properly maintained chain you should get 10,000+ miles out of your cassette.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    That's an expensive way of doing it. If you replace your chain when required, rather than yearly, there's no reason at all to replace your cassette. With a properly maintained chain you should get 10,000+ miles out of your cassette.
    True.
    Worn-out/stretched chains will damage chainrings/cassettes. Replacing chains when they show wear (measure with ruler or chain wear tool) will save the gears.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Mazzulla View Post
    Also break pads are worn some but I'm really surprised their not more worn.
    These things are called brakes, and they have brake pads on them. Unless you break them, then they're broken brakes.
    However, you're not supposed to break them, you should just use them to brake.

    The spelling police.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by tihsepa View Post
    I love this, replace this, replace that. None of us have even seen the bike.

    Idea Get it checked out by someone you trust. Replace what is bad and ride it.
    Best advice ever. We all just make spectulations here..

  19. #19
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    I would fix what is broken, worn out, or out of adjustment.

    My cassette probably has 12,000 to 14,000 miles on it. They last much longer than one chain.

    Chain wear mileage depends on many factors, including dirty roads, and strong riders mashing the pedals.
    You should measure the chain with a steel ruler, and replace when the distance between rivets is 12 and 1/16 inch or less. See this clear explanation.. (But I find it's easier to measure from the right edges of the chain pins, instead of trying to measure the centers.)

    Some components wear out
    I've had the right shift cable fray and break up near the shifter (on a Campagnolo shifter). The shifter cables should probably be replaced every other year. Brake cables seem to last a long time for me.

    The small pulleys in the rear derailleur can get worn out. These should last at least a few years. The top pulley has a little side play built in, to help with shifting cogs. But when worn out, it can get very loose, and make the shifting sloppy.

    Rear derailleur adjustments
    It's good to learn how to adjust the rear derailleur, so you can keep the chain centered on the rear cogs, which makes for better shifting. It's pretty easy, but it's possible to get it way off if you just randomly try to turn the cable adjustment.

    See the Park Tool Repair Help The rear derailleur page starts from scratch, setting the high and low limits, then adjusting the shift indexing. It is a lot easier to do this if the bike is on a bike stand.

    Check the bearings
    Take the wheels off. Hold the axle, and spin the wheel in the air. Does it feel smooth? If it's rough or grinding, you probably need new bearings. They should last for many years, though.

    Shift to the small chainring, then lift the chain off it, and rest it on the frame (with a rag or paper towel to avoid scratching the frame paint) Now spin the crank by hand. It should spin at least a couple of revolutions, and not have any rough feel or grinding noise.

    Other maintenance checks
    Clean the frame, and inspect the frame at the joints for any hairline cracks.

    See if the brakes are still centered, so that both pads touch the rim at the same time. If not, most brakes have an adjusting screw for minor adjustments.

    Have someone hold the bike up, spin one wheel, and slowly squeeze the brakes. Does the wheel wobble side-to-side, causing a brake pulsation? Either the spokes need adjusting to true the wheel, or it's bent from slamming a pothole.
    Last edited by rm -rf; 04-11-2013 at 04:48 PM.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Mazzulla View Post
    I have an REI store nearby, I'm just not sure if I should take my Trek there.
    I wouldnt take my bike to REI. Find a dedicated bike shop instead. Or invest in some tools and do your own work.

  21. #21
    .je
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    I have a 1.1, and after about 2500 miles realized I should have really kept up on maintenance. That is to say, done any. Now I was good about keeping the cables tight and the brake pads free of aluminum pieces, and lined up, but ignored the chain and cassette. I was in just almost exactly the same situation you're in now.

    Here are some things to do yourself if you have not already been in the habit:
    Tighten the barrel adjusters for the derailleurs (on the derailleur, or the downtube) counterclockwise until the slack is gone.
    Tighten the barrel adjusters for the brake calipers counterclockwise until the slack is gone.
    You won't need tools to do the above, and don't risk damage. If those dont do enough, you'll have to pull the cable through its attachment...
    Take the brake pads off and inspect for pieces of aluminum, and pry them out if you find any. Re-install them toed-in (you might want a hand with all this)

    That's the easy stuff, stuff you've done since you were a kid, so maybe you know about them!

    Now, clean your chain with WD-40 and a rag, then when that's dried off, oil it - when I did this, the chain skipped badly (it didn't skip at all before), so I had to replace the chain and cassette. My 1.1 had a plain steel Sunrace cassette where yours has a SRAM PG950 cassette with chrome plating - which might be more durable, but you wouldn't know until you put a new chain on - and it skips like mad on even more gears. Likely you'll need both items, which on ebay might cost $45 total not counting tools (that how much I paid for these exact two items, 9 speed chain and cassette - I actually have a PG850 on the 1.1 now). It'd be a lot more at a bike store, but at this point you'll know if you need a new chain and cassette.

    Good luck with this, if you keep the thread current you'll probably get all the good advice you need .

    Just don't tell them you used pliers to pull the cable, a few people here will send you straight to fiery hell if they find out. It's strange, I don't understand this.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by .je View Post
    Tighten the barrel adjusters for the derailleurs (on the derailleur, or the downtube) counterclockwise until the slack is gone.
    Doing this changes the adjustment of the dérailleurs and should only be done if you are having problems with shifting.

    Tighten the barrel adjusters for the brake calipers counterclockwise until the slack is gone.
    ???? You should adjust the break cables so that the break pads are about 5mm from the rims.

    Now, clean your chain with WD-40 and a rag, then when that's dried off, oil it - when I did this, the chain skipped badly (it didn't skip at all before), so I had to replace the chain and cassette. My 1.1 had a plain steel Sunrace cassette where yours has a SRAM PG950 cassette with chrome plating - which might be more durable, but you wouldn't know until you put a new chain on - and it skips like mad on even more gears. Likely you'll need both items, which on ebay might cost $45 total not counting tools (that how much I paid for these exact two items, 9 speed chain and cassette - I actually have a PG850 on the 1.1 now). It'd be a lot more at a bike store, but at this point you'll know if you need a new chain and cassette.
    Hmmm.... My guess that your chain skipped because you had been messing around with the barrel adjusters and altering the dérailleur settings.

    You should get a new chain when it is stretched. You can get handy measurement tools or just use a ruler. More here: Chain Maintenance

    Sprockets should be replaced when the teeth wear down. The link above discusses that as well.

    Basic bicycle maintenance is simple.
    -Wipe off the chain and put on a thin coat of fresh oil every couple weeks or after a wet ride.
    -Clean up your dérailleurs every month and lube the moving parts.
    -Wash your bike occasionally. A wax every now and again is nice too.
    -Put a couple drops of lube in your shifters every month or two.
    -Replace tires as needed.
    -Give your whole drivetrain a good degeasing and relubing every few months or as needed.
    -Relube your seat post and headset every six months or so.
    -Break the whole thing down every year or so. Rebuild your wheel bearings and BB.
    -And the number one way to keep your bike working well: pay attention to it while you ride and inspect it regularly.

  23. #23
    .je
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    I am sure that even the OP worked on their bikes as a youngster, so I didn't think I needed to be totally specific. OP should adjust the brakes to whatever is comfortable, which was never 5mm for me, but after all that use they're surely farther than that.

    I expected that the OP's cables were stretched (thinned and elongated as a cable, the wires aren't stretched), so it wouldn't shift very well, so tightening the cable would put it back to new working length. I know the best plan is to extend the cable out the free end at the attachment, but it sounds like OP would want the LBS to do that.

    My chain skipped because it was worn 3/32" or so as I measured it, and the cogs were worn too. If OP lubes the chain and finds the same as I did, then replacing those parts will probably solve that problem for him too. If he needs to, he can unhook the cables and reattach them the way the Shimano instructions say, it's not too hard.

    The rest of your advice is spot-on, of course (I think OP is a bit hesitant to do some of these things, like breaking the whole thing down every year or so). I hope more people chime in for OP.
    Last edited by .je; 04-13-2013 at 03:25 AM.

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