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  1. #26
    Fecal indicator
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    Quote Originally Posted by MMsRepBike View Post
    There's zero greasy residue on anything ever. Yes, grey waxy stuff gets on things...I usually do 120-140 miles on each lube.
    meh, still sounds like a PITA and a dubious trade-off...and being able to wash bike parts in the sink or shower is not an incentive of any sort.

    I'll gladly tolerate a little grease to have 750-1000 mi lube intervals...
    the 45th POTUS is inept, corrupt, and a pathological liar. and those may be his better qualities...

  2. #27
    gazing from the shadows
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    Come spring, I wash the main bikes and inspect them. Do anything I put off over the year (replace tape, treat Brooks, shock oil in the MTBs, etc). I then put on any new things for the season.

    After that...

    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    I lube the chain when it needs it. And I replace things when they wear out or break.
    ^^^ this.
    .
    Stout beers under trees, please.

  3. #28
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    I clean & lubricate the chain about every 200-300 miles. I get about 5,000 miles between replacements. I also lubricate the pivot points of the derailleurs and brake calipers, cable barrel adjusters and cables where they extend from their housings. I used to be diligent about lubricating the shift cables (Shimano) inside the shifter, but I reached the conclusion that it doesn't extend the time before the onset of fraying / cable replacement. Clean the wheel braking surface with lens cleaner towelettes remove any residue, and clean the brake pads with sandpaper. Check the headset for looseness and snug up as needed. Thorough cleaning and lubrication after getting caught out in the rain.
    Insert something clever here:

    Insert list of every bike I own here:

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wetworks View Post
    After every ride I wipe down and inspect the tires, looking for any cuts that may need attention (Shoo-Goo FTW).
    +1^
    I do this as well, with most of the other common sense stuff mentioned.

    Occasionally I see small sharp gravel bits, glass, fine wires, etc stuck in the tire that has not yet punctured the casing. It gets pulled and the split filled with Shoe Goo.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    I'll gladly tolerate a little grease to have 750-1000 mi lube intervals...
    This.
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  6. #31
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    Sounds like WAY too much work. Rock n Roll Gold every 200-300 miles and an occasional chain and cassette cleaning (Gear Floss anyone?) and you're good to go. I prefer riding to bike maintenance. Never took a wheel into a shower and have no desire to do so.

  7. #32
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    I have two words for you: Sealed Bearings. Never repack a bearing again. I have a beautiful 1985 vintage bike with full Campy Super Record that I haven't ridden in quite some time, but that is in pristine condition because I would tear down and repack every bearing at least once a season. No more since I now run sealed bearings.

  8. #33
    a real member's member
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    Quote Originally Posted by bespoke View Post
    I have a beautiful 1985 vintage bike with full Campy Super Record that I haven't ridden in quite some time, but that is in pristine condition because I would tear down and repack every bearing at least once a season.
    you should be able to ride it on dry days 50 times a year, fully overhaul it once every two or three years, and continue to keep it "pristine."
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  9. #34
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    You're absolutely right, and not the first person to tell me that. It's just that it's hard to go back to friction shifters and toe straps! It was a sweet ride for 25 years, but I think of it more as a sentimental museum piece.

  10. #35
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    Maintanence? What is maintanence? Ride it till it makes some funny sound, then fix that and ride some more!
    BANNED

  11. #36
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    New chain lube every 150/200 kms,of course first degrease and dry the chain. Smooth shifting is priceless. Di2 now so no more yearly cables check and replacement. Once a year hub cleaning and fresh grease.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by bespoke View Post
    Rock n Roll Gold every 200-300 miles and an occasional chain and cassette cleaning (Gear Floss anyone?) and you're good to go.
    Same for me, and yes Gear Floss is great.

  13. #38
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    charge the battery.

  14. #39
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    I never ride in the rain. Ever.

    I repack hubs when they seem a bit rough. I don't mess with bottom brackets unless they are noisy or not smooth. I clean up headset bearings if too much rust is coming out of them. Generally, if it ain't broke I don't fix it.

    I wipe down all my bikes after every ride. I rarely wash my road bikes, maybe twice a year. I wash my gravel bike after every three or four rides as it gets covered in fine dust quickly. I wash my mountain bikes after almost every ride as they get filthy. I thoroughly dry all my bikes after washing, drying takes more time than washing.

    I try to use minimal lube on my bike. I run my chains almost dry, wiping off all excess and only use enough prevent them from squeaking. I replace chains and cassettes fairly frequently. I almost never change chainrings.

    I pull the seatpost on every bike every couple of months to ensure there's no water in the BB shell and to ensure the post hasn't seized.

  15. #40
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    ^ i like hero11's approach above on the condition he had built/rebuilt/fully overhauled the bike once before.

    if you ride much, you will certainly get caught in the rain/storm that wasn't forecast. if you do that with the same bike a few times, i'd say you need to check out the bb every couple years.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  16. #41
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    If I didn't ride in the rain, I'd miss out on all the best riding months from Oct to June here. Especially mtn biking which I only do in rain season (Oct to June). Fortunately what most call slight drizzle, we call rain. Rarely rains hard. But since modern bearings are all sealed and chains and cables are easy to clean .. this is a trivial concern

    edit - now this sucks. We did not have a trace of rain since june until last night. Doing a Fondo tomorrow and the forecast is rain the whole day, LOL.
    Last edited by BCSaltchucker; 2 Weeks Ago at 06:38 AM.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    If I didn't ride in the rain, I'd miss out on all the best riding months from Oct to June here. Especially mtn biking which I only do in rain season (Oct to June). Fortunately what most call slight drizzle, we call rain. Rarely rains hard. But since modern bearings are all sealed and chains and cables are easy to clean .. this is a trivial concern
    I see you live in Canada. Which province, BC?
    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein

    "Beware of geeks bearing formulas."
    -- Warren Buffett

    "Education is what you get when you read the fine print. Experience is what you get when you don't. -- Pete Seeger



  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I see you live in Canada. Which province, BC?
    that be it

  19. #44
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    After reading this thread I feel better. I thought most regular posters had an obsessive maintenance routine, tore their bikes down once a year, and kept elaborate records.

    I have two bicycles, an aluminum road bike with a 5700 groupset and a steel 29er/adventure bike with a 9-speed Deore triple drivetrain and XT brakes. I ride year round in NJ, about 4000 miles, though it will be closer to 5000 this year.

    Only thing I do daily is check the tire pressure. I also spin the Speedplay pedals on both bikes fairly often to check the grease.

    I'm not fastidious with maintenance and generally only tend to things when they call attention to themselves or when I remember. Because I commute on both, I replace things early rather than try to stretch the life as long as I can. An exception is cables, which are long overdue.

    Neither bike usually sees water unless it rains, and I wipe down the steel one when it does. I hose them down in my building's loading dock if they're particularly grimy.
    It's Mueller Time

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtrac View Post
    I have two bicycles... Neither bike usually sees water unless it rains.
    what? no under the sea touring? you're missing out.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by ceugene View Post
    As for the great, ongoing lube debate, I have no strong opinions on most other lubes. It's really just the wax lubes in general that gave me a truly awful experience.
    I think I picked up on the problem recently while going over the new Ceramic Speed UFO Drip lube information and listening to Friction Facts.

    I'll cut to the chase, the issue or the difference between riders and their intervals is their reaction to noise.

    The discussion started because the UFO lube runs very loudly, and it's supposed to. UFO is basically a fancy Squirt with friction modifiers added, it works the same. It's supposed to be run dry, clean and loud.

    According to FF, Squirt is supposed to run pretty loud too. If you're adding it until the drivetrain is silent and trying to keep it that way, you're doing it all wrong. If you follow the directions, there will be chain noise. This is expected. If there isn't any chain noise, there's too much lube picking up too much grit making it less efficient and a mess.

    So basically, if you want to use Squirt or UFO you have to live with moderate chain noise.
    use a torque wrench

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by ceugene View Post
    Why the threat? A bunch of my friends and I all tried Squirt at the same time and we all had the same experience. Despite following instructions to the letter, our drivetrains would become noisy after just 40mi. We asked Ned Overend (who was manning the Squirt tent at Sea Otter) about it. He said if you're doing something like a century or a sportive, you should bring a small bottle of Squirt with you and relube mid-ride. He tried to explain how it wasn't a big deal since you're probably going to stop for food anyway.

    I'm honestly curious at how it works for you. I tried my hardest to make it work since wax lubes test well. It left gray "candlewax" all over my drivetrain--in both derailleur cages, in between cogs, on the back of the largest cog, on the edge of my chainrings, etc. This build-up was fairly resistant to degreaser (and the wax lube specific solvents) and I had to use a brush to get in between the cogs on a one-piece Red cassette.

    So yeah, I'm shocked that any roadie would use Wend, Smoove, Squirt, etc.
    This was largely my experience with Squirt too.

    I gave it a solid three month or more trial and probably two thousand miles. Just not worth it, so I went back to LillyLube for my main road rig and not a moment too soon.

    I use Dumonde Tech on other less ridden bikes and ones I maintain for others like my daughter, knowing full well she's not going to clean or lube it once between my service so it needs something with staying power.
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  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanE View Post
    I clean & lubricate the chain about every 200-300 miles. I get about 5,000 miles between replacements. I also lubricate the pivot points of the derailleurs and brake calipers, cable barrel adjusters and cables where they extend from their housings. I used to be diligent about lubricating the shift cables (Shimano) inside the shifter, but I reached the conclusion that it doesn't extend the time before the onset of fraying / cable replacement. Clean the wheel braking surface with lens cleaner towelettes remove any residue, and clean the brake pads with sandpaper. Check the headset for looseness and snug up as needed. Thorough cleaning and lubrication after getting caught out in the rain.
    This is essentially my routine along with a once weekly close inspection of the rubber, and I do break down the hubs, cranks and rear derailleur at least once a year for a deep clean and repack.
    .
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