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  1. #1
    PIITWhat?
    Reputation: Love Commander's Avatar
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    Looks like a big 'ol dingdong.

    Sorry, I have nothing constructive to add.

    /penis

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    What's the scoop on Aero bars??

    I'm new to road cycling, having done mostly MTB. Just bought my 1st bike and really enjoy it.

    Anyway, a buddy is selling his bike and gave me these:



    They're Profile Design Airstrykes. They seem well made and don't weigh that much.
    I don't see a lot of riders around here using them, so I guess my question is what's the benefit of them other than getting the weight off my hands for awhile???

  3. #3
    just ride your bike
    Reputation: desurfer's Avatar
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    If you're not in a tri, TT, or riding across the country, putting aerobars on a roadie is a capital crime with the fashion police (and this is coming from someone with an MTB helmet + shoes, fenders, rack, and handlebar bag).

  4. #4
    Urb
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    Riding aero. aero > light in all but the hilliest of rides.
    You get all the sleep you need when you are dead

  5. #5
    Fecal indicator
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    you don't need those.

    just put em out at the curb and hope someone takes them.
    eff all y'all...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Love Commander View Post
    Looks like a big 'ol dingdong.

    Sorry, I have nothing constructive to add.

    /penis


    LOL...how about a different shot of them :


  7. #7
    I Love PAIN
    Reputation: EHietpas's Avatar
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    Ride if you don't want them send them over here. Those are a really nice set of aerobars. Aerobars give you a different location for your hands. More weight is distributed through your arms. The negative is that more weight is on your front wheel which makes steering pin point and squirrelly until you get use to it. I easily pickup 2-3 mph on my speed when in my aerobars. You do have to adjust your seat a little forward though to use them comfortably. There are a lot of different sites on how to setup your bike when using them.

    (I'm a DU - TRI guy though.) If your going on group rides they DO NOT WANT them on your bike or you to use them for safety. You can't reach your brakes or shift very easily in this position.

  8. #8
    Fix Altitude in My Tracks
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    Quote Originally Posted by desurfer View Post
    If you're not in a tri, TT, or riding across the country, putting aerobars on a roadie is a capital crime with the fashion police (and this is coming from someone with an MTB helmet + shoes, fenders, rack, and handlebar bag).
    desurfer - what about sleevless along with the aero bars?

    What the Fashion Police said back in 2010
    aero bars on a commuter ...

  9. #9
    tlg
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    They take some getting use to with steering! Especially on windy days. You steer more by leaning than steering with the bars. It's VERY easy to overcompensate. This is why they're not acceptable on group rides.

    I have a shoulder injury that bothers me sometimes so I'll use them on long rides if my shoulder is acting up as they give me more comfort.
    And the fashion police can kiss my lycra covered @$$.

  10. #10
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    I see people hugging them on the road, they are setup quite upright, going about 16mph.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by oxtox View Post
    you don't need those.

    Just put em out at the curb and hope someone takes them.
    ouch!!!:d

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    They take some getting use to with steering! Especially on windy days. You steer more by leaning than steering with the bars. It's VERY easy to overcompensate. This is why they're not acceptable on group rides.

    I have a shoulder injury that bothers me sometimes so I'll use them on long rides if my shoulder is acting up as they give me more comfort.
    And the fashion police can kiss my lycra covered @$$.
    Great tip tlg....thanks.

    As for the fashion police, well....WHAT YOU SAID!! This middle age guy could care less.
    Heck, I've got the Amgen team guys riding on the same routes I do....I'll let them worry about the fashion police

  13. #13
    Not a climber
    Reputation: dcorn's Avatar
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    Rode a tri bike for the first time last weekend. I felt super uncomfortable and unstable in the aero bars. This was a Trek demo and I was on a super spendy speed concept 9, damn near wrecked when I hit a big dip in the road. It was pretty scary and unavoidable. Couldn't get back to the normal bars in time. Not a fan and with the twitchy steering, I can see why roadies don't like riding with Tri guys in groups.

  14. #14
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    You know this thread is going to blow up with the pro and cons of aero bars.


    My two cents, you don't need the aero bars. Aero bars are for tri bikes.

    Riding in the drops on your road bike will give you the same speed advantage.

  15. #15
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcorn View Post
    I felt super uncomfortable and unstable in the aero bars.
    Remember when you were a little rugrat and rode a bike for the first time? You were unstable. But with practice you learned balance and felt comfortable.
    Kinda the same thing. Riding aerobars takes practice. You don't just start riding them and feel stable.

  16. #16
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    Aerobars are significantly more efficient than other riding positions. Compare them (and other stuff) here:

    Bike Calculator

    As noted above, don't use them in group rides.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Italia View Post
    Aerobars are significantly more efficient than other riding positions. Compare them (and other stuff) here:

    Bike Calculator

    As noted above, don't use them in group rides.
    it's not just a group ride situation where they can pose a problem...

    being in a head-down tuck with no direct contact on the brakes on in-town routes with numerous traffic control devices and unpredictable drivers can create some issues.

    seen a couple of crashes attributable to this. efficiency gained at the expense of situational awareness and bike control is a poor trade.
    eff all y'all...

  18. #18
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    WOW....didn't realize there were two extreme difference of opinions on this.

    Maybe I'll just sit back and

  19. #19
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by RideN View Post
    WOW....didn't realize there were two extreme difference of opinions on this.

    Maybe I'll just sit back and
    You're just scratching the surface. You still have a whole load of these types of topics ahead of you. Sunglass arms over or under helmet straps? Shaving---yes/no? Any benefits? Helmet visor---good/bad? Will my carbon frame eventually fail or "assplode"?

    So pop up a bowl and sit back.

  20. #20
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    being in a head-down tuck with no direct contact on the brakes on in-town routes with numerous traffic control devices and unpredictable drivers can create some issues.
    I'll only use them on long stretches of low traffic straight roads. No way on places you have to turn a lot.

    And keep your eyes on the road! Potholes (even small ones) are a death trap. You can't swerve quick to avoid them. You can't bunny hop them. And you don't want to hit them!

  21. #21
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    If you want to go fast, forget the aero bars and do this:

    shave your legs - It’ll make you 1-3 mph faster, depending on how hairy you are of course.
    Lubing your chain, cleaning your bike, and filling your tires past their max will also make you faster.
    Make sure to carbo load before your next 5-10 mile ride.
    It is an absolute must to have components equal to or higher than Ultegra, otherwise, your speed and power really will suffer, especially on a climb.

    I don’t have a good opinion on the bars but I do know that you not only don’t need a helmet to ride but that it is safer without one. You do not need to shave your head however as that will not give you any added speed benefit – only shaving legs does that. I’m not sure of the science behind it but you can find out for yourself by asking in Yahoo Answers.

    And please remember that you should never, no wait…always, listen to music while riding.

    Lastly, bike lanes are dangerous and for losers who want to get hit by cars.

    Surely we can agree on all of that?
    I ride mostly in the honorable pursuit of being kissed on both cheeks at the same time by one blond and one brunette. But not redheads, they scare me.

  22. #22
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    Gotta agree with you again tlg, without easy access to brakes, etc, I'd limit their use to wide open area where I know I can maintain control.

    I think the main benefit I'm looking for is the different position and taking weight off the hands. They tend to go numb after awhile. Have the same problem on the motorcycle......probably an age thing!!

  23. #23
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    If your primary interest in the bars is 'cause your hands are going numb, you'd probably be better served with a professional fit.

    Oh, and if you have interest in group rides, the aero bars are not even allowed in some of those - it's club-specific.

  24. #24
    have droids, will party
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    I think the majority will agree that if you're not engaging in any sort of solo, timed effort, there's no real reason for them. I'd consider them a nuscience more than a benefit (safety and handling aside). Also, the arms of your sunglasses will be over the straps of your helmet. That's just how it's done.

  25. #25
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    I saw a guy yesterday riding with them and wearing a 3/4 length north face jacket, camel back, going about 15 mph and an aero helmet. I thought it looked strange but who know sthe story behind it.

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