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  1. #1
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    Why do I get water in my tires?

    Hi,

    Whenever i ride in the rain for around 3 to 6 hours I always get some water in my tires when I check them at home.

    I am using Conti 4 season with latex tubes.
    And my wheels are DT Swiss ERC (tubeless ready).

    I don't even ride in the puddles...

    Do all of you who are biking in the rain also get some water in the tires after a few hours??

    Any way to prevent it??

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by tony_mm View Post
    Any way to prevent it??
    Tire condoms.

  3. #3
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    Spoke holes

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    Spoke holes
    I don‘t think so because the rims have one tiny hole so that the water can escape - and the rim itself is tubeless ready.

  5. #5
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    Another idea could be that the hole for the valve of the tube is maybe not 100% sealed with the use of the tube. So maybe water enter through this ?

    What do you think?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tony_mm View Post
    Another idea could be that the hole for the valve of the tube is maybe not 100% sealed with the use of the tube. So maybe water enter through this ?

    What do you think?
    A tubeless ready rim would have only one hole in it, the valve. So there ya go!

    The only other place would be the tire bead seating on the rim, but at 95 psi can't imagine how water could leak in that way. Could the bead be uneven? Nah...

    If the valve squishes a little bit on the rim rolling through the "flat spot," water could leak in imperceptible amounts that would add up over the miles.
    Last edited by Fredrico; 02-06-2018 at 12:20 AM.

  7. #7
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    Easy mystery to solve.

    Submerge it in water and watch for bubbles.

  8. #8
    Happily absent RBR Member
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    The wheel is a centrifuge with the tire a basin on the outside. The wheel turning at high speed is going to force water on the spokes into any opening and to the "low" spot in a centripetal structure - the inside top of the tire.

    Tubeless requires special tires and special rim strips to become airtight. Even your sidewalls might be allowing water to go through them.
    Get a better saddle: www.kontactbike.com

  9. #9
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    I know with mtb's many people find that some tubeless tyres have the sealant come through the sidewall and need to top up extra to stop leaks, and these tyres are thicker than non tubeless(so they dont leak, or leak less), so it's quite possible that water is coming in through the sidewall of a road tyre among other places.
    All the gear and no idea

  10. #10
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    Tubeless requires special tires and special rim strips to become airtight.
    And usually sealant too.

    Regular tire beads are absolutely not water/air tight.
    Custom Di2 & Garmin/GoPro mounts 2013 SuperSix EVO Hi-MOD Team * 2004 Klein Aura V

  11. #11
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    Is the water getting into the tire or into the rim? Into the rim would be easy, thru the valve hole and maybe spoke holes, but I would think that the air pressure in the tubes would keep water from migrating into the tires.
    Too old to ride plastic

  12. #12
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Is the water getting into the tire or into the rim? Into the rim would be easy, thru the valve hole and maybe spoke holes, but I would think that the air pressure in the tubes would keep water from migrating into the tires.
    No, it happens. I rode a century in the driving rain once and there was water in the tires. kontact is right -- the spinning wheel acts like a centrifuge.

    So I guess there's 3 options:

    1. Get a tubeless set up
    2. Live with it and remove your tires when you ride 3-6 hours in the rain
    3. Don't ride 3-6 hours in the rain

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmf View Post
    No, it happens. I rode a century in the driving rain once and there was water in the tires. kontact is right -- the spinning wheel acts like a centrifuge.

    So I guess there's 3 options:

    1. Get a tubeless set up
    2. Live with it and remove your tires when you ride 3-6 hours in the rain
    3. Don't ride 3-6 hours in the rain
    A 4th option...

    Don't look after riding in the rain.
    Too old to ride plastic

  14. #14
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    getting some water in the tire/rim is a normal if riding in the wet. This is one reason why I don't ride in the wet if I can avoid it. Also, I don't wash my wheels by spraying water directly into them; only use a wet rag to wipe them.

  15. #15
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    Depends on how much water we are talking about.

    More than likely, if it is only a small.. tiny amount.. it is the moisture in the air that you pump into your tire condensing when the tire warms up due to friction (even in cold weather).

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljvb View Post
    Depends on how much water we are talking about.

    More than likely, if it is only a small.. tiny amount.. it is the moisture in the air that you pump into your tire condensing when the tire warms up due to friction (even in cold weather).
    1. Reading comprehension issue: He said water in the TIRES, not in the tubes. He also said this only happens after a long ride in the rain.

    2. Physics issue. Water vapor condenses into liquid when the air containing it COOLS, not when it warms up. Conceivably, if you pumped up the tires on a very warm and humid day, some of the humidity could condense when the bike later sat in the cold.
    Have you ever been to Electric Ladyland?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    A 4th option...

    Don't look after riding in the rain.
    +1. Who has time for that? Your aluminum rims and rubber tires aren't going to rust.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    A 4th option...

    Don't look after riding in the rain.
    That was my first thought- who the F checks their tires for water after a ride? Dry the hoods and drivetrain sure, but check the wheels for water? Not this guy.


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    The internet is a little like a bar, a wonderful place where we can bullsh(t our past, but it also, is full of reasonably reliable sources of information to be used as ammo to call "bullish)t."

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    getting some water in the tire/rim is a normal if riding in the wet. This is one reason why I don't ride in the wet if I can avoid it. Also, I don't wash my wheels by spraying water directly into them; only use a wet rag to wipe them.
    Eh, I ride in the wet and wash my wheels with a hose (when I bother to wash the bike at all) and I’ve never found water in my wheels. Have looked either, but never found it to cause and issue, either.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The internet is a little like a bar, a wonderful place where we can bullsh(t our past, but it also, is full of reasonably reliable sources of information to be used as ammo to call "bullish)t."

  20. #20
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    Thanks for all replies and ideas!

    From what I can assess, the water could have two different ways of coming into the tires:

    1/ Through the hole of the valve of the tube. But actually at 95 psi for the latex tube I have inside the tire I supposed that water could not come through. However the rotation of the wheels during a 3 to 6 hours ride could maybe lead some water coming through maybe.

    2/ Through the walls of the tire. I am not sure that the walls of the Conti 4 seasons are "sealed" against water.


    N.B:
    - The amount of water is maybe something like 2 to 3 table spoons after a 5 to 6 hours ride. When I come back home I always clean my chain and doing that when I turn the crankset and the rear wheel I can hear some water inside the tire. That's how I discovered this.
    - The wheels/ rims are tubeless ready so that the water coming along the spokes cannot come into the tire (except via the hole for the valve).

  21. #21
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    Wouldn’t the tube in the tire act as a gasket and prevent water getting in through the valve stem hole? Also wouldn’t rim tape and the tube prevent water getting in through the spokes?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmach View Post
    Wouldn’t the tube in the tire act as a gasket and prevent water getting in through the valve stem hole? Also wouldn’t rim tape and the tube prevent water getting in through the spokes?
    That's what I was thinking initially but after reading the replies and thinking I guess there must be some "under-pressure" in the tube and/or tire after the tire is having a pressure on the asphalt that attracts the water either through the walls of the tires or through the hole of the valve.

    @all: what do you think?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjdhawkhill View Post
    Eh, I ride in the wet and wash my wheels with a hose (when I bother to wash the bike at all) and I’ve never found water in my wheels. Have looked either, but never found it to cause and issue, either.


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    I have an mtb that I used to use to ride in the rain, over puddles, etc, and never checked its wheels ever, just wipe the water off and wheels would look cleaned,, on the outside. After about 3 years, almost every nipples and spokes thread got rusty and oxidized to the point it was impossible to true the wheels (because the nipples would break and the spoke thread would strip). There as also many oxidized spots on the rim near the nipple holes too. By then wheelset was a beater set. But now knowing what I happened back then, I'm not riding my expensive wheels in the wet.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by dir-t View Post
    +1. Who has time for that? Your aluminum rims and rubber tires aren't going to rust.
    aluminum does undergo oxidation, not to the same degree as iron, but it does rust

  25. #25
    pmf
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjdhawkhill View Post
    That was my first thought- who the F checks their tires for water after a ride? Dry the hoods and drivetrain sure, but check the wheels for water? Not this guy.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Loading the bike in the car after riding 100 miles in the rain -- I took the front wheel off. I could feel water sloshing around in the rim. So I took the tires off the wheels when I got home and let everything dry out.

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