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  1. #1
    jwk
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    Why does Cycling Hurt my knees? Help

    Gentleman, I have no idea why my knee hurts after a ride but during the ride it feels fine, no pain. But then about 4 hours later, it will start to ache. I experience a very sharp pain that is acute. No clicking noise, no dislocating feeling. No swelling or discoloration but it feels like the muscles around my knee is screaming. I cannot straighten my legs without yelping or bend my knee without excruciating pain. Running does not hurt my knees at all but for some reason cycling is killing me. The worse part is on some days my right knee is throbbing but left leg is fine but then other days it will be reversed, Anybody here have same issues? No cartiledage damage that I can see but one never knows

  2. #2
    Pitts Pilot
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    Most foks here are going to tell you the same thing - go see a doctor or physical therapist to find out what's wrong and take it easy or quit riding until you do. It might be a simple fix. I have problems with my I.T. band on one side. (I never hear of an I.T. band until I went to a physical therapist.) She gave me a foam roller to roll up and down my outer thigh - hurts like hell - fixes the knee issue.

  3. #3
    jwk
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pitts Pilot View Post
    Most foks here are going to tell you the same thing - go see a doctor or physical therapist to find out what's wrong and take it easy or quit riding until you do. It might be a simple fix. I have problems with my I.T. band on one side. (I never hear of an I.T. band until I went to a physical therapist.) She gave me a foam roller to roll up and down my outer thigh - hurts like hell - fixes the knee issue.
    Well I figure if it was. it would also affect my running which it does not.

  4. #4
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    Screaming pain? Does it come on slowly and you just keep going till it's screaming or does it come on suddenly-fine one moment then the next screaming? You can't see cartilage damage. If this pain is screaming pain you need to see a doctor, most knee problems can be easily fixed today, but it will take some painful physical therapy.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xk98yvozq1g
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvk63...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=p92Stnnigjs
    "They don't do things that way anymore. This is the Age of Science Know-How, electronal marvels."

  5. #5
    HELL ON WHEELS
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    Could be a problem with the way your bike setup or a shoe problem, sole not right for your foot or knees, cleats could be too far back or too far forward, find the best fitter in town and get a proper bike fit.

    Most aches and pains that are associated with cycling can cured with a proper bike fit.

    If that doesn't work, I'd stop riding until you see a doctor.
    Religion. It's given people hope in a world torn apart by religion.

  6. #6
    jwk
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    Quote Originally Posted by froze View Post
    Screaming pain? Does it come on slowly and you just keep going till it's screaming or does it come on suddenly-fine one moment then the next screaming? You can't see cartilage damage. If this pain is screaming pain you need to see a doctor, most knee problems can be easily fixed today, but it will take some painful physical therapy.
    Usually when I ride it does not bother me but hours later it will then suddenly start to throb. at a loss to determine what is wrong

  7. #7
    Bianchi-Campagnolo
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigTex_BMC View Post
    Most aches and pains that are associated with cycling can cured with a proper bike fit.
    ^This. If you can run but not ride it's most probably the fit.
    They do anything just to win a salami in ridiculous races. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me. It was the illest of times, it was the dopest of times. And we looked damn good. Actually the autobus broke down somewhere on the Mortirolo.

  8. #8
    Potatoes
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    Asides from bike fit, it could also be your technique. Are you grinding away in higher gears? If so, try spinning your legs instead. Also be sure to stretch, warm up and down a little too.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwk View Post
    Usually when I ride it does not bother me but hours later it will then suddenly start to throb. at a loss to determine what is wrong
    It's a fit issue. Now where is the pain? By that I mean is the pain in the front of the knee, on the back, or on a side and which side?

    Here's some good sites to help you figure out what you need to do to eliminate it. Do these things first and do one thing at a time then ride before moving to the next. Try this stuff first before you waste money on a pro fit at a LBS, pro fits you have about a 50/50 chance of them getting it right and a 100% chance of spending more then $250!!

    See: Knee Pain After Riding A Bicycle | LIVESTRONG.COM
    Cycling & Knee Cap Pain | LIVESTRONG.COM
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xk98yvozq1g
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvk63...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=p92Stnnigjs
    "They don't do things that way anymore. This is the Age of Science Know-How, electronal marvels."

  10. #10
    jwk
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    Quote Originally Posted by froze View Post
    It's a fit issue. Now where is the pain? By that I mean is the pain in the front of the knee, on the back, or on a side and which side?

    Here's some good sites to help you figure out what you need to do to eliminate it. Do these things first and do one thing at a time then ride before moving to the next. Try this stuff first before you waste money on a pro fit at a LBS, pro fits you have about a 50/50 chance of them getting it right and a 100% chance of spending more then $250!!

    See: Knee Pain After Riding A Bicycle | LIVESTRONG.COM
    Cycling & Knee Cap Pain | LIVESTRONG.COM
    Thanks for this info. I am going to check out this site. The pain is around the kneecap and seems just off to the inner side. No pain on the outer side above kneecap. When I touch the inner part of the knee it is tender to the touch. kneecap does not move around when pushed to one or other side or hurt. Seems like a bruising but it prevents me from extending my leg or contracting it. I had been fitted properly and all last year, same setup it has never bothered me. Maybe because running is my primary sport, I didn't ride for the last several months and now that I been peddling maybe a gear too high, it is causing this strain. I am going to take alot of time off from riding and stick to running and see if pain goes away. If that is the case then I know it is the bike. Right now not sure if it is running or biking to blame but thinking it is cycling

  11. #11
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    Another vote for the fit and technique. I'd have the bike fit BEFORE you see a doc. If you find your current fit is correct or close, then look hard at your technique. Do you use a computer that lets you analyze your cadence by section? Seeing your average for a 30 mile ride is largely useless. If you're spinning 90 on the flats and mashing 50 seated on climbs... you see my point.

    If you find your fit AND your technique are good... go see that doc.

  12. #12
    jwk
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    Quote Originally Posted by majura View Post
    Asides from bike fit, it could also be your technique. Are you grinding away in higher gears? If so, try spinning your legs instead. Also be sure to stretch, warm up and down a little too.
    Yeah I want to thank everybody here. I am going to stop by a bike shop and have my fitting re-evaulated. Prior to me getting my SRAM S80's, I was never into biking. But I bought these wheels simply because they look cool. However, after getting a few stone chips in the carbon part of the rim, now I know why people buy zipps. I have looked at zipp wheels with miles on them, none have the kind of nicks and what appears to be pinholes in some parts, believe it is a manufacture defect. anyway never heard of a wheel failing because of stone chips but I will sure enough be the first to report on it.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Why does Cycling Hurt my knees? Help-my-ride.jpg  

  13. #13
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    Another vote for a professional fitting.

    The best money I've spent on cycling. It added pain free miles and speed to my riding. Talk to the tech about your riding style and what you want to accomplish. You will be amazed that the smallest changes in fit and technique can give you giant gains in comfort and speed.

    If that doesn't work, see a Doctor. Just remember, Your pain is not caused by your body having a oxycodone deficiency. Treat the cause, don't mask the symptom.

  14. #14
    Steaming piles of opinion
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    Getting fit is the right answer; however, quality varies so ask around first.

    As only slightly more than a guess, seat too low is my first bet at diagnosis. Consistent with the type of pain, and with the bike photo, though obviously that could be very, very misleading. Do not treat this as advice or take any action based on it - just engaging in the conversation. Other things - or a combination - could equally be involved.
    A good habit is as hard to break as a bad one..

  15. #15
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    Which would you rather do mostly, running or cycling? If cycling, maybe try stopping your running and see if the knee loves you more. If after attempting to dial in your bike and you still have issues I would see a doctor, it's better to see a doctor sooner rather then later when something happens while running due to a hidden problem you knew nothing about instead of waiting till the problem is a major one.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xk98yvozq1g
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvk63...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=p92Stnnigjs
    "They don't do things that way anymore. This is the Age of Science Know-How, electronal marvels."

  16. #16
    Fred the Clydesdale
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    Another for a fitting! I have been riding a spinner at work to keep the legs in motion at least. I set one up wrong one day and later, one leg hurt (it was more of a tendon/ligament thing). I figured out that I had the seat too far back. While I was riding, it felt fine.

    All is well now.
    Member of Team Collin, a group of ordinary moreons going to extraordinary levels of awesome in the fight against cancer.

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  17. #17
    jwk
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    I think I solved the problem to my knees. I raised my cadence by shifting to a much lower gear and although I am no longer able to maintain a 21 to 23 mile per hour pace, I am now going like 17 to 18, my knees do not hurt anymore. I am still left to wonder how do others are able to peddle a higher gear and not get knees that are overstrained.

  18. #18
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Once you ride at the higher cadence for awhile your speed will come back up and eventually even be faster then where you were at! Your lungs are actually stronger then your legs, you have develop them of course. So don't get frustrated with the speed issue, give it about 3 months and you'll see improvements.

    Everyone is built differently, some people can take the strain of cranking higher gears others can't. Sometimes even age changes the dynamics of what we once could do. I use to be able to run up to 15 miles (boredom kept me from running further!), but that was 35 years ago, I can't run more then maybe a 1/4th of mile now with out the knees revolting, but cycling-even cranking up mountains don't bother then the least bit.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xk98yvozq1g
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvk63...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=p92Stnnigjs
    "They don't do things that way anymore. This is the Age of Science Know-How, electronal marvels."

  19. #19
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    Since you are a runner you understand base building. The same applies here. Those that can spin a higher gear have a lot of miles under them.

  20. #20
    jwk
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    Quote Originally Posted by froze View Post
    Once you ride at the higher cadence for awhile your speed will come back up and eventually even be faster then where you were at! Your lungs are actually stronger then your legs, you have develop them of course. So don't get frustrated with the speed issue, give it about 3 months and you'll see improvements.

    Everyone is built differently, some people can take the strain of cranking higher gears others can't. Sometimes even age changes the dynamics of what we once could do. I use to be able to run up to 15 miles (boredom kept me from running further!), but that was 35 years ago, I can't run more then maybe a 1/4th of mile now with out the knees revolting, but cycling-even cranking up mountains don't bother then the least bit.
    Hey Froze, thanks for the info! I can run 100 miles a week no problem to my knees but as I have learned and now realizing, biking uses your knees differently so I have to start slowly and build just like you said and the other guy. Anyway, I discovered what appears like pinholes in my carbon fiber surface of my SRAM S80's and I think it is mostly due to tiny stones being thrown up. But one person told me when you get pinholes, they allow moisture to get inside the fiber build up and can cause the wheel strength to be comprimised. SRAM told me they have heard of a wheel failing from stone chips so I guess I will just leave it at that. Whether it weakens my wheel there is nothing I can do about it.

  21. #21
    jwk
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rburr View Post
    Since you are a runner you understand base building. The same applies here. Those that can spin a higher gear have a lot of miles under them.
    Rburr definitely a good point and will be doing this from now on.

  22. #22
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    Same thing with me Foam roller and then a better bike fit. Needed some shims under one of my cleats. Amazing what 2-4mm will do.

    Also, elevation of the leg with Ice and compression (and 3 advil) after a ride helped too.

  23. #23
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    Who made the wheels?

  24. #24
    Not a climber
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    Dude, how many times are you going to post a pic of that bike and go on and on about the S80's that changed your mind about cycling?

    Maybe you should get lighter, smaller profile wheels so you don't have to crank as hard to turn them.

  25. #25
    T K
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    I don't get your bike at all.
    You have a Synapse. An upright posistion, comfort bike, non aero. But you have aero wheels and a set of aero bars. Seems a bit confused.
    Also, I'm pretty sure those Sram wheels you have there are made by Zipp.

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