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  1. #1
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    Nova Pro commuter?

    I have a line on an 08 or 09 Nova Pro frame and fork. I see it has eyelets front and rear, but wonder is it really adaptable to a rear rack and full fenders for commuting?

    I really like the geometry of this frame, like the fork, it seems about ideal for what I'm looking for. But the rear carbon fiber seat stays make me wonder how you'd attach the rack and/or fender in back. I'm sure I can cobble something together (actually I'm not worried about actually attaching them), but wonder if its really suited for this sort of thing.

    I will also be using it for trail riding, etc. but not racing at all, ever.

  2. #2
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    OK, I bought the frameset. It's a nice unit, in good shape. I put it together yesterday and it will work fine as a commuter. I think there's cross frames that are better suited for it though.

    The chainstays are fairly short for this sort of bike. I put 32mm smooth tires and there's plenty of tire clearance all aound, but it's tough to fit full size fenders between the tire and the seat tube. Also a problem with the arm of the FD hitting the fender. That can be dealt with w/ a little fender trimming which I'll do after I experiment with the FD (see below). Next time (if there is), I'll look for one with at least another 1/2 cm chain stay length.

    This fender clearance issue is a little surprising because the frame is built with a chainstay bridge drilled to mount a fender, but the clearance is pretty scant. I'm going to look again... maybe I have a wide-ish fender and need a narrower one. (these are Planet Bike plastic fenders and I have no idea how they compare to other full fenders.

    Another weird thing: the the chain stay interferes with the front derailleur cage on the innermost position w/ my MTB triple. I had to raise it quite a bit so it would clear the stay when I shift to the inner ring. It still shifts fine, but there's now a lot of vertical clearance over the large ring. I have two other FD's in the junk box (a road triple and an old Suntour MTB triple) and will probably see if they maybe have shorter cages and/or a different arm throw.

    The fender clearance is not a big deal, but I'm kind of perplexed on the cage-chain stay clearance. Maybe this is one of the cross frames that just isn't intended to be suitable for a triple. There is no problem with the chain rings themselves though.

    Anyway, all of this stuff is solvable, so I'm happy enough. The frame rides great and seems to be good quality.

  3. #3
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    Posting another reply to my own posts - just to get the count up!

    Just a follow up for posterity.

    Replaced the Deore LX MTB FD with an Ultegra triple I had on hand (6503, fwiw). The modest difference in design of the cage and the arm made a huge difference. The clearance problem with the chainstay is gone, and the arm doesn't come anywhere close to interfering with the fender. So I was able to install the fender w/o any modification.

    The derailleur worked perfectly on the repair stand with the 44-32-22 crank. It's designed for a 52-32-30, fwiw. Will take it for a ride today for a road test.

  4. #4
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    How would this bike be for cyclocross racing (for newbie).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by seastar View Post
    How would this bike be for cyclocross racing (for newbie).
    As sold, it is intended to be a cyclocross racing bike. If you look at the specs for the fully equipped new bike, it is obviously a CX bike, not a commuter. The guy I bought my frame/fork from used it for racing.

  6. #6
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    When I consider a bike for commuting, I think of 4 seasons and for me that means studded tires.
    Studded tires in 700c start at 35mm, and you DO want fenders (longer are better) at the same time.

    If you ride in more than an inch or two of snow then disc brakes may be a better bet. Iced rims can be problematic.

    I would consider the Aurora Elite or the Bossanova. They are very good for mounting racks and should have enough clearance for the fenders too, with the studded tires.

    I thought that the Nova Pro was more of a CX racer and would be a stiffer ride as a result. How is it working for you?
    Last edited by Minnesnowtan; 10-10-2011 at 10:30 PM. Reason: typo repair

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minnesnowtan View Post
    When I consider a bike for commuting, I think of 4 seasons and for me that means studded tires.
    Studded tires in 700c start at 35mm, and you DO want fenders (longer are better) at the same time.

    If you ride in more than an inch or two of snow then disc brakes may be a better bet. Iced rims can be problematic.

    I would consider the Aurora Elite or the Bossanova. They are very good for mounting racks and should have enough clearance for the fenders too, with the studded tires.

    I thought that the Nova Pro was more of a CX racer and would be a stiffer ride as a result. How is it working for you?
    No doubt you're correct for a lot of commuters, especially those who ride in the snow and slush. I don't so this bike is working OK.

    As for the ride quality. I'll have to say that I'm not a connoiseur at all of ride quality. The Nova Pro is quite comfortable for me though. I use the same saddle and overall saddle and handlebar, reach and drop, etc. set up as my carbonfiber (Felt Z) road bike and have it dialed in very comfortably. I don't notice any frame-related discomfort but I really imagine that the 32mm tires would virtually negate any frame-related harshness. But I really don't know. Heck, I thought my Cannondale CAAD7 was plenty comfortable (again, same saddle and overall setup), so what do I know?

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