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  1. #1
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    "The Age Of The Car In America Is Over"

    "The "driving boom" — the steady rise of the car in America in the six decades after the end of World War II — is over, according to a new report by the US Public Interest Research Group (US PIRG)."

    The US Driving Boom Is Over - Business Insider

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  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    If only. Mostly, it's b/c people simply can't afford the damn things on top of everything ELSE.

    Which reminds me, gotta bring the Infiniti into the shop tomorrow- first a brake seized up, then an airbag cable got loose or something, now it's losing power for no reason..... I swear they're pre-programmed to crap out at regular intervals.

  3. #3
    Sweet Potato Kugel
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    Emerging markets will gobble up every single drop of oil available in the world's supply happily. As the USA declines in consumption you'll have China, Brazil, Russia, and India, as well as Mexico, Indonesia, and Turkey happily drive their unregulated or whathaveyou combustion and non-emissions ridden vehicles- putt putting around the stratosphere.

    Balance.

  4. #4
    .je
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    Wait till these Millenials actually get a job, then we'll see if anything has changed.

  5. #5
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    It's depressing to consider. How all of those bikes in China are giving way to cars. Sure, it's a natural progression, everybody loves and wants to drive cars, but it's like they're going backward in terms of actual progress.

    Utopia, as we all know, is a society of bike-riders after all

  6. #6
    Sweet Potato Kugel
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    It's depressing to consider. How all of those bikes in China are giving way to cars. Sure, it's a natural progression, everybody loves and wants to drive cars, but it's like they're going backward in terms of actual progress.

    Utopia, as we all know, is a society of bike-riders after all
    I don't agree. You have to buy a couple ten-twenty condominiums in Shantou, China for your hedge retirement investment. LOL When the housing bubble bursts over there ...it will be devastating. There is no good olde days. It's a figment of one's imagination. They are emerging and hopefully their lives will be cleaner and more healthier than in the past century or nine.

    I love the smells of capitalism in the mornings.

    Quote Originally Posted by Buy Buy Buy
    ...snip
    Rapid urbanization will contribute to GDP growth but also carries serious challenges. By our estimates, demand for energy in urban areas will more than double, and demand for water will increase by 70 to 100 percent. Providing health care and education to new migrants will severely strain municipal finances. Depending on the shape urbanization takes—more concentrated or more dispersed—7 to 20 percent of the country’s arable land could be lost. Urban sprawl, massive slums, pollution, and traffic gridlock are some of the problems cities around the world confront when infrastructure and municipal services fail to keep pace with the influx of people. Decisions that China’s officials make today will determine whether its cities struggle to cope with growth (as in Mexico City, Mumbai, and São Paulo) or emerge as world-class metropolises on par with London, New York, and Tokyo.
    Meeting the challenges of China’s growing cities | McKinsey & Company

  7. #7
    Dr. Buzz Killington
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    I'm glad I don't drive that much. I probably put less than 450 miles per month on my car, and if it were practical I'd rather bike to work. It's only 11 miles each way, but I have to start my shift at 6AM and won't leave until 645PM.

  8. #8
    MB1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Creakyknees View Post
    "The Age Of The Car In America Is Over"
    Someone forgot to tell all the drivers out there!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails "The Age Of The Car In America Is Over"-imgp1670.jpg   "The Age Of The Car In America Is Over"-imgp1677.jpg   "The Age Of The Car In America Is Over"-imgp1550.jpg  
    Quote Originally Posted by the_dude
    these are better than i was expecting, and my expectations were already rather high.

  9. #9
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    I just wish that were my reality. I have been trying to figure out a way to live a lifestyle where I don't have to drive my car.

  10. #10
    Proud luddite
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    I blame Facebook for this.

  11. #11
    MB1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    ...everybody loves and wants to drive cars.....
    Well I can testify that is not true!
    Quote Originally Posted by the_dude
    these are better than i was expecting, and my expectations were already rather high.

  12. #12
    Sweet Potato Kugel
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    Quote Originally Posted by MB1 View Post
    Well I can testify that is not true!
    I have almost eliminated the car since 2008. All 8,000 to 9,000 miles riding a bicycle per year is almost entirely commuting to work and back 9 months a year. I walk to near-by stores and restaurants and have eliminated assignments to locations not accessible to bicycling or commuter trains/subways.

    In europe, I didn't use my car at all. Only on holidays driving to another continent. LOL. I remember having an assigned vehicle that sat in front of the building never moving for months as I commuted from outskirts of Paris to inner city round-trip, about 50 miles daily riding. I'd use the RER or subway in really bad weather.

    In my mind, it's a mental thing. I never thought I'd have what I had in europe here -in the USA. And I have to say, this sport is absolutely the best thing that ever happened to me in my entire life. The 7 years of not riding in the US and driving 20,000 miles a year was a complete waste. Fat, ugly and unfit, now after riding these five years again - I'm just ugly. LOL

    I have to agree with you.

  13. #13
    Sweet Potato Kugel
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    Quote Originally Posted by azpeterb View Post
    I blame Facebook for this.
    ^^^
    He speaks a truth

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    It's depressing to consider. How all of those bikes in China are giving way to cars. Sure, it's a natural progression, everybody loves and wants to drive cars, but it's like they're going backward in terms of actual progress.

    Utopia, as we all know, is a society of bike-riders after all
    I agree about Utopia! But natural progression... not so much. In America... animal [horse] waste pollution was an awful and deadly situation... before cars cleaned up the air. The "natural progression" is an ugly messy thing to watch. And generally it takes more than a single generation to see it.

    Technology really does improve mankind's condition... and always has in every way. It just frightens some people. Cars are the temporary transportation between horses.... and wherever new technology takes us next.

    Although.... admittedly... the well-meaning fearful may keep us in tiny cars and windmills for a few decades. Before visionary's once again allow mankind to "naturally progress".
    If I didn't bicycle when the weather is bad... I wouldn't be a cyclist. I'd just be another old fat man... with a bicycle hanging in his garage.

    Urban Cycling.... Overcome your fears (a YouTube Link).
    Learn to cycle in traffic
    Or... just HTFU

  15. #15
    LWP
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    Quote Originally Posted by pulser955 View Post
    I have been trying to figure out a way to live a lifestyle where I don't have to drive my car.
    I figured it out. I drive less than 500 miles/year. If it weren't for a few trips to the next closest town, which is about 60 miles away, it would be more like 50 or so (short drives to keep the car working properly would be about it). I've very seriously considered just getting rid of it... but I don't want to be the person trying to borrow a car if an emergency came up or if I want to go out of town. I bike or walk everywhere in town. Of course it's easier living in a small, remote town. Everything there is to do is within 5 miles of my house. Most things are within 2 miles. So, if I cut out those trips out of town, which I do because I want to, not because I have to, I wouldn't need to drive at all. But I don't really have a zero driving goal, it just kinda worked out that I come close to that in my normal everyday lifestyle.
    Crusty old farts are people too.
    - 10ae1203

  16. #16
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    Sorry to hear about your Infiniti problems . I just have my 2005 Infiniti front and rear brakes done by my friend who is a car mechanic . He supplied the parts ( ceramic brake pads ) , labor = $ 250 . No other problem so far .

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by .je View Post
    Wait till these Millenials actually get a job, then we'll see if anything has changed.
    To put it better...kids now drive and own a car because they absolutely have to, not because they want to. Cars are no longer a social need/want/accessory...they're now a money hole to be tolerated.

    That being said...gross miles driven is no way to have this discussion...the meaningful stat is the trend of car ownership per capita.
    Man. You are all stuped.
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  18. #18
    LWP
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    the meaningful stat is the trend of car ownership per capita.
    True. And I haven't reached a point where I'm willing to be without one despite the fact that I really don't need it... so it's still a want/accessory for me.
    Crusty old farts are people too.
    - 10ae1203

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by .je View Post
    Wait till these Millenials actually get a job, then we'll see if anything has changed.
    ^ I like this post
    * not actually a Rock Star

  20. #20
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    Re: "The Age Of The Car In America Is Over"

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    To put it better...kids now drive and own a car because they absolutely have to, not because they want to. Cars are no longer a social need/want/accessory...they're now a money hole to be tolerated.

    That being said...gross miles driven is no way to have this discussion...the meaningful stat is the trend of car ownership per capita.
    I'd love to not drive, but unfortunately because of my work that's not realistic. Plus, I don't see how anyone with kids could go without driving. I can't see my wife taking my 3 kids (batten 2 & 5 years of age) to the store, or anywhere else for that matter, on foot.

  21. #21
    Le Misérable
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    The Atlantic put a slightly more refined touch on this issue early last year:

    Why Don't Young Americans Buy Cars? - Jordan Weissmann - The Atlantic

    I had to drive to work today because my Tuesday client is inaccessible by bike or public transit and the weather was decidedly Vespa unfriendly. It was the first time in months.
    C'est dommage que je sois un ignorant, car je vous citerais une foule de choses ; mais je ne sais rien.

    --Hugo

    Living in France, le blog

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by .je View Post
    Wait till these Millenials actually get a job, then we'll see if anything has changed.
    As a millennial with a very good job, I doubt it. I put about four times as many miles in on my bike as in a car last year out of personal preference. Life is easier when you don't have the obligations of a big house in the burbs and a commute. Most people my age are starting to understand that.

  23. #23
    You Phillip mah census
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eretz View Post
    I don't agree. You have to buy a couple ten-twenty condominiums in Shantou, China for your hedge retirement investment. LOL When the housing bubble bursts over there ...it will be devastating. There is no good olde days. It's a figment of one's imagination. They are emerging and hopefully their lives will be cleaner and more healthier than in the past century or nine.

    I love the smells of capitalism in the mornings.

    I think the bubble has burst in some of the second tier regional capitals. Ever been to Beijing? The 'world-class metropolis' where you can't see past the end of your nose because of the smog? I always laugh too at people who are bedazzled by the glitter of Tokyo. Sure Ginza and Nishi Shinjuku are great, but there are whole swathes of east and south Tokyo that can look like an East German public housing project on a bad day. Despite the excellent public transport system, the roads are clogged with 'one-box' Nissans and Toyotas. If ever a city was poorly adapted to the automobile it's Tokyo.
    China has already left it too late.The other BRIC nations will follow suit. Repeating the same mistakes. I can't think of a single Asian conurbation that I've visited (and I've been to a lot) that has come up with any kind of solution to it's urbanisation woes that aren't based on Western assumptions that the car should have primacy as a means of mobility.
    So, one whole cheer for the youth of North America who can't afford gas.
    There ain't no sanity clause... (Chico Marx)

    I accidentally..a burrito. (Old Fuji)

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  24. #24
    LWP
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    Quote Originally Posted by sir duke View Post
    So, one whole cheer for the youth of North America who can't afford gas.
    I haven't been a youth for a long time but gas being $6.00/gallon definitely makes deciding not to drive a lot easier for me.
    Crusty old farts are people too.
    - 10ae1203

  25. #25
    Dr. Buzz Killington
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    That Atlantic article briefly touched on what I think is a major factor in millenials not buying cars: economics. I bought my first car in 2004, and it was a 2002 Chevy Cavalier LS Sport coupe with 13000 miles on it. KBB's private party value was $9500 (I paid $8700), but when it was brand new it was just under $14000. I bought my latest car, a 2012 Ford Focus Titanium hatchback, last June for $26500. Like Nealric I'm a fortunate millenial with a well-paying job to afford a decent car, but a lot aren't so fortunate. These days the only new car you can get for under $20k is a subcompact, and those aren't very practical to say the least unless you're physically tiny and never haul anything. Sure, you can buy a "base nasty" Ford Focus for $16500 plus tax, title, and tag, but it's a stick shift with manual windows, and not even the back seats fold down. So, to get something half decent that's functional enough to be practical, you're going to spend over $20k easily, and I can see why a lot of millenials are averse to that when it's for a compact car. Of course, buying CPO or used are less expensive options, but every used car comes with its own baggage.

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