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Thread: ApacoEclipse

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    I drove into the industrial depths of Queens to procure some #14 welding glass the other day, they were almost sold out.

    Weather is clear, sunny but hot. Not sure where I'll go, probably just bike to Fort Totten. Big tree in the backyard blocks the view a bit, otherwise I'd be happy with that.

    John will have an incredible view from the roof of his work site, in Chelsea. I packed him some viewing glass and a black-and-white cookie, which seems appropriate.
    Being the procrastinator than I am, I tried to buy some eclipse glasses two weeks ago and I got laughed at everywhere I went, so now we plan to use the projection box method. I may also try to set up our telescope and project the image on a screen. My daughter and a friend drove to South Carolina this weekend and will watch totality there. I am a bit envious

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    In Clemson SC at the botanical garden. Mostly sunny. Overheard on the lawn that this is tailgating for nerds. We even have some shade from a tree.

  3. #28
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    I work in high tech.
    At the office we're supposed to get about 96% of a total eclipse
    Areas where there will be a total eclipse are only a few hours away
    The interstate heading north was packed all weekend.

    The office is completely empty today.

    Supposed to be some major traffic jams with people returning home this afternoon.
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  4. #29
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    If you can't be there, NPR has some live coverage planned. Live Blog: Total Solar Eclipse Crosses The U.S. : The Two-Way : NPR Now let's see if we can break the Interwebs and cellular systems watching and posting this thing.
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  5. #30
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    Near the 94% we're supposed to get in Oly, WA, so sorta' like sunset, only with the sun getting higher in the sky. Less than 1/4, or even 1/8 sun can be seen now thru my eclipse glasses. Also suddenly cooler outside. No birds chirping outside either. I'm going back outside to see if peak eclipse alters my life . . .

    Will report back.

  6. #31
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    Damn the #14 glass is strong stuff. Only thing you can see through it is a faint green ball when looking directly at the sun.

    Our tree is blocking most of it so I'll have to venture around the neighborhood.

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    Got 1/4 of the sun back, and it's warming up again on my deck. Life still not altered, however.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    No kidding. We had a microburst T-storm saturday night...beautiful clear sky yesterday, and mostly cloudy today. Figures.
    Its starting to cloud over here in NJ. My daughter was getting really excited; I am afraid it will be a big let down for her. The live coverage from Oregon was really cool though

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    Being the procrastinator than I am, I tried to buy some eclipse glasses two weeks ago and I got laughed at everywhere I went, so now we plan to use the projection box method. I may also try to set up our telescope and project the image on a screen. My daughter and a friend drove to South Carolina this weekend and will watch totality there. I am a bit envious
    I had a 25power scope set up to project onto a screen, but got clouded over, so no go. But in setting it up it was sunny and I used the system to take a peak at the sun and I'm glad I did. The image was clear enough to see small whisps of clouds pass in front of the sun, and bright enough that we wore our sun glasses to view the image.
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  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    Its starting to cloud over here in NJ. My daughter was getting really excited; I am afraid it will be a big let down for her. The live coverage from Oregon was really cool though
    Yea clouded up here just after 40% obscured. Got real dark and real quiet. Even the traffic on the highway stopped.


    Then all the confused night-animals started making "WTF?!" noises.
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  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10ae1203 View Post
    In Clemson SC at the botanical garden. Mostly sunny. Overheard on the lawn that this is tailgating for nerds. We even have some shade from a tree.
    Just up the road from you in Greenville.
    Some clouds went by when the sun was about 1/4 blocked but that was it, clear viewing for the rest of it.
    As we neared totality it was pretty amazing, almost instant sunset with the temperature dropping and an almost Autumn-like breeze, very amazing. We had about two minutes of totality which turned out to be eerily quiet and calm, like all of nature was saying WTF.
    Coming out of totality was just an instant rush of sunlight from the tiniest exposed sliver, and of course, the warmth. Wow.
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  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by upstateSC-rider View Post
    Just up the road from you in Greenville.
    Some clouds went by when the sun was about 1/4 blocked but that was it, clear viewing for the rest of it.
    As we neared totality it was pretty amazing, almost instant sunset with the temperature dropping and an almost Autumn-like breeze, very amazing. We had about two minutes of totality which turned out to be eerily quiet and calm, like all of nature was saying WTF.
    Coming out of totality was just an instant rush of sunlight from the tiniest exposed sliver, and of course, the warmth. Wow.
    Watching the videos of locations with totality and clear skies there is a huge difference between my paltry 71% totality and the real thing. I wish I had experienced it

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by upstateSC-rider View Post
    Just up the road from you in Greenville.
    Some clouds went by when the sun was about 1/4 blocked but that was it, clear viewing for the rest of it.
    As we neared totality it was pretty amazing, almost instant sunset with the temperature dropping and an almost Autumn-like breeze, very amazing. We had about two minutes of totality which turned out to be eerily quiet and calm, like all of nature was saying WTF.
    Coming out of totality was just an instant rush of sunlight from the tiniest exposed sliver, and of course, the warmth. Wow.
    The crickets and tree frogs started up for a while. No other wildlife observations.

    It was thoroughly amazing. Watching in a place with maybe 100 other people was cool, because of the contagious excitement at a few times.

    I had some fun with a pinhole viewer and cereal box viewer, and our garden neighbor pointed out the cascading crescents from dappled shade.

    A cool day.

  14. #39
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    We got lucky. Clouds started rolling in after the eclipse began. We missed a good bit of the first half, and then about 10-15 minutes before totality, the sky opened up just enough for us to experience it. And it was pretty cool.

  15. #40
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    I read this incorrectly: "Alpaceclipse".
    I expected to see a lot of South American camelids.
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  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by upstateSC-rider View Post
    Just up the road from you in Greenville.
    Some clouds went by when the sun was about 1/4 blocked but that was it, clear viewing for the rest of it.
    As we neared totality it was pretty amazing, almost instant sunset with the temperature dropping and an almost Autumn-like breeze, very amazing. We had about two minutes of totality which turned out to be eerily quiet and calm, like all of nature was saying WTF.
    Coming out of totality was just an instant rush of sunlight from the tiniest exposed sliver, and of course, the warmth. Wow.
    Dig it. Below is a great description of the event over Oregon in '79 I believe. A bit long, sometimes so chock full of meaning its hard to follow, but a great read.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/...clipse/536148/.

    The deepest, and most terrifying, was this: I have said that I heard screams. (I have since read that screaming, with hysteria, is a common reaction even to expected total eclipses.) People on all the hillsides, including, I think, myself, screamed when the black body of the moon detached from the sky and rolled over the sun. But something else was happening at that same instant, and it was this, I believe, which made us scream.


    The second before the sun went out we saw a wall of dark shadow come speeding at us. We no sooner saw it than it was upon us, like thunder. It roared up the valley. It slammed our hill and knocked us out. It was the monstrous swift shadow cone of the moon. I have since read that this wave of shadow moves 1,800 miles an hour. Language can give no sense of this sort of speed—1,800 miles an hour. It was 195 miles wide. No end was in sight—you saw only the edge. It rolled at you across the land at 1,800 miles an hour, hauling darkness like plague behind it. Seeing it, and knowing it was coming straight for you, was like feeling a slug of anesthetic shoot up your arm. If you think very fast, you may have time to think, “Soon it will hit my brain.” You can feel the deadness race up your arm; you can feel the appalling, inhuman speed of your own blood. We saw the wall of shadow coming, and screamed before it hit.

    This was the universe about which we have read so much and never before felt: the universe as a clockwork of loose spheres flung at stupefying, unauthorized speeds. How could anything moving so fast not crash, not veer from its orbit amok like a car out of control on a turn?

    Less than two minutes later, when the sun emerged, the trailing edge of the shadow cone sped away. It coursed down our hill and raced eastward over the plain, faster than the eye could believe; it swept over the plain and dropped over the planet’s rim in a twinkling. It had clobbered us, and now it roared away. We blinked in the light. It was as though an enormous, loping god in the sky had reached down and slapped the Earth’s face.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    Damn the #14 glass is strong stuff. Only thing you can see through it is a faint green ball when looking directly at the sun.
    That's why you use 12 or 13. Looked pretty good at those settings.

  18. #43
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    We have this. , First, let me say how totally amazing it was to deal with 1000 people interested in celestial events. Complete with kids so willing to listen to and learn. Our youngest daughter is the resident astronomer at the Michigan Science Center . Patsy and I worked the solar telescopes from start to finish. I had an older lady look up from the scope, with tears in her eyes and throw her arms around me and hug me and thank me for helping her see this. Not a great picture, we were in Detroit, at about 80%. I just pressed my lens against the ocular on the solar scope.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails ApacoEclipse-img_20170822_084353.jpg  
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  19. #44
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    For reference some of the other members here got phenomenal stuff from totality.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by RRRoubaix View Post
    I read this incorrectly: "Alpaceclipse".
    I expected to see a lot of South American camelids.
    For a Alpaceclipse you would still need special glasses, except these would be designed to protect your eyes from all the spit

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    For a Alpaceclipse you would still need special glasses, except these would be designed to protect your eyes from all the spit
    However, the fur makes them very comfortable to wear.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by RRRoubaix View Post
    I read this incorrectly: "Alpaceclipse".
    I expected to see a lot of South American camelids.
    I wasted a lot of time preparing in advance for a thread response, by searching Youtube for alpaca clips of alpacas with a lisp.
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  23. #48
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    Just back from a 2,020 mile back road motorcycle adventure to see Totality in Idaho,. My vantage point was on a hill and watching the Moon's shadow rush towards you at 1500 MPH while the air temperature is falling rapidly was memorable during the 5 minutes surge of celestial activity will not be forgotten. .

     photo 20170818_174249.jpg
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  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by troutmd View Post
    Just back from a 2,020 mile back road motorcycle adventure to see Totality in Idaho,. My vantage point was on a hill and watching the Moon's shadow rush towards you at 1500 MPH while the air temperature is falling rapidly was memorable during the 5 minutes surge of celestial activity will not be forgotten. .

     photo 20170818_174249.jpg
    Gorgeous! I too was on a hill in the park, but it wasn't nearly as dramatic.

    Wondering if it's worth going to South America for the next one, but we don't speak Spanish and would probably just get ourselves killed in the process.

    Guess we'll wait for the next one in N. America, and hope that 'murkans don't suddenly decide to become scientifically curious before then. Don't want to deal with insane crowds.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    We have this. , First, let me say how totally amazing it was to deal with 1000 people interested in celestial events. Complete with kids so willing to listen to and learn. Our youngest daughter is the resident astronomer at the Michigan Science Center . Patsy and I worked the solar telescopes from start to finish. I had an older lady look up from the scope, with tears in her eyes and throw her arms around me and hug me and thank me for helping her see this. Not a great picture, we were in Detroit, at about 80%. I just pressed my lens against the ocular on the solar scope.
    Great pic!

    I was unaware of the exact time it would pass over DC/NVA. Took a nap about that time, slept like a baby for the first time in months, and woke up 4 hours later entirely refreshed. Very strange experience.

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