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  1. #1
    I like waterboarding...
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    expat'n it up... have some questions...

    So I went to dinner this evening with the new CEO of our company. I got the impression from some of our conversations that I was being felt out. Long story short on the history of our company is, 3 years into a our drilling program our investors forced us to close up two of our offices and move everything into our Indonesia office where we're operating from.

    This essentially terminates my employment in Houston effective sometime around the end of March. So circle back to dinner, I got a strong feeling that I was being screen to see if I'd expat out to Indonesia for an undefined period of time...

    Given my future employment situation, the lack there of, would you consider relocating your family to continue on with your current post rather than seek new employment? I dont have much in the way of things holding me back to Houston other than convincing the wife to pack up our stuff and move... There are our dogs but we can just eat them before we leave.

    If you're an expat or where at some point, you have any advice to offer?
    Last edited by mymilkexpired; 02-17-2011 at 05:37 AM.
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  2. #2
    corning my own beef
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    wow .....

    there's about a bazillion considerations, but as an empty-nester, the situation would be a bit more simplified for me than for others with kids still living at home.

    what I would do is probably irrelevant. Everyone weighs the dozens of factors at play differently. But I'm looking forward to seeing some of the responses from those with experience.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymilkexpired
    So I went to dinner this evening with the new CEO of our company. I got the impression from some of our conversations that I was being felt out. Long story short on the history of our company is, 3 years into a our drilling program our investors forced us to close up two of our offices and move everything into our Indonesia office where we're operating from.

    This essentially terminates my employment in Houston effective sometime around the end of March. So circle back to dinner, I got a strong feeling that I was being screen to see if I'd expat out to Indonesia for an undefined period of time...

    Given my future employment situation, the lack there of, would you consider relocating your family to continue on with your current post rather than seek new employment? I dont have much in the way of things holding me back to Houston other than convincing the wife to pack up our stuff and move... There are our dogs but...

    If you're an expat or where at some point, you have any advice to offer?
    That sounds cool.

    Also being "felt out" for a "drilling program" is great kode.

  4. #4
    Zaphod Beeblebrox
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    I have young children and would would not hesitate to jump at the opportunity to live the expat life. I think it would be good for the kids to experience something other than life in the US. I've already put the bug in the ear of my oldest (7) and he's now constantly asking questions about other countries that he sees on the news. Convincing momma is going to be another story....
    From what I've heard playing a banjo is an easy way to get into your sister's pants

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  5. #5
    I like waterboarding...
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    Quote Originally Posted by DLMKA
    I have young children and would would not hesitate to jump at the opportunity to live the expat life. I think it would be good for the kids to experience something other than life in the US. I've already put the bug in the ear of my oldest (7) and he's now constantly asking questions about other countries that he sees on the news. Convincing momma is going to be another story....
    This mirrors my feelings. It would be the ideal time for us to make the transition if it's going to happen. Our daughter is only 3 so exposing her at such a young age would be great. Wife is sorta in tow. My salary is substantially more than hers and if we made the move our expenses would be pretty nil aside from food etc... So financially it would be a net gain for us.

    I'll have to see how things flesh out over the next 40 days while I'm here.
    Last edited by mymilkexpired; 02-17-2011 at 06:05 AM.
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  6. #6
    hit it
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    In the oil bidness, project work & international work look great on the resume. I say go for it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scotty2Hotty View Post
    But I'm not a douche. I'm awesome.

  7. #7
    Zaphod Beeblebrox
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    Quote Originally Posted by mymilkexpired
    This mirrors my feelings. It would be the ideal time us to make the transition if it's going to happen. Our daughter is only 3 so exposing her at such a young age would be great. Wife is sorta in tow. My salary is substantially more than hers and if we made the move our expenses would be pretty nil aside from food etc... So financially it would be a net gain for us.

    I'll have to see how things flesh out over the next 40 days while I'm here.

    The people I know that have done an expat stint are rolling in dough, their expenses are paid while abroad including several trips back to the US each year to visit for holidays or whatever. I'm sure a lot of how it's handled is dependent on your company but I from my viewpoint it's a great deal financially and culturally.
    From what I've heard playing a banjo is an easy way to get into your sister's pants

    -TWB8s

  8. #8
    Good news everyone!
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    I don't know much about Indonesia but I'm not sure I'd want to live and work there. What's to say they don't outsource your job again once you get there?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DLMKA
    The people I know that have done an expat stint are rolling in dough, their expenses are paid while abroad including several trips back to the US each year to visit for holidays or whatever. I'm sure a lot of how it's handled is dependent on your company but I from my viewpoint it's a great deal financially and culturally.
    +1 One of best friends finished his MBA a few years ago (he was a PE with an undergrad in civil engineering). He got a job for a local company that builds power plants throughout the world. He has been abroad (same location) since then. He gets an amazing salary, plus a car, furnished apartment, and a nice stipend. He says he doesn't even touch his paycheck- straight to the bank.

    Funny story- when he left the company paid for a shipping container. All he brought was a new laptop, new TV, some clothes, some personal items, and filled the rest with many cases of good beer (and some Budweiser). It made him really popular with the other ex-pats b/c he had a huge supply of US beer.

  10. #10
    Windrider (Stubborn)
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    If you start talking details.....make sure you are kept whole for taxes.

    Len



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    No one is as bad as the worst thing they have done & no one is as good as the best thing they have done.........think of that when you feel like you understand someone.

  11. #11
    waterproof*
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    Terry B needs to weigh in... maybe PM him.

  12. #12
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    On the other hand, aren't oil jobs still pretty plentiful in the states? You could probably move to another company.

    Devils advocate aside, go for it. I would love to live/work in a foreign country for a year or two. However, I would need a pre-established return to home and country date to look forward to. I'm too connected to just let go of the states for good.

  13. #13
    Is not a clown car
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    As a young family here, we'd jump at a chance like that. We've talked about it in the past as well. The educational expereince for the kids, and you would be beyond measure. Then there's the financial stimulus. That would certainly help.
    Disclaimer: I sell ::Singulars:: and write a :blog:
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  14. #14
    I like waterboarding...
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    So... the dialog has begun... The company is now formally working on a compensation package to bring me and the family over. Surprisingly the wife is on board!

    So we'll see what unfolds over the next two weeks leading to the shutdown of my Houston office...
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  15. #15
    ARP
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    I did the Expat thing for 1.5 years back in the mid 80's

    it was the highlight of my former career. I met alot of other expats while there and I knew of some who went over, stayed for about 15 years and retired back to the US. some had bought McDonalds franchises, some apartment buildings...........I had a great support system while there, an air base was nearby with all the ammenities of the US, softball league, social gatherings every weekend. Tax exempt pay up to a certain dollar amount, 2 months off per year, airfare, free housing, car, fuel. Ahhh the good ole days.....

  16. #16
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    I missed this thread two weeks ago and I do nothing but lurk but I'll chime in as I have the dual experience of being both an expat child and now an expat as an adult.

    My parents worked in Saudi Arabia for about 8 years starting when I was about 3 years old. From my perspective the experience was great. Going to an international school was fun as my peer group had extremely varied backgrounds. I also had access to a lot of experiences that I would have missed in the US and I never felt like I was missing out so I would definitely think it would be great for your kids. One issue with Saudi Arabia, and it may well be true in Indonesia as well, is that a lot of expats end up in compounds. It's not necessarily a bad thing but it is a different way to live and can be isolating unless you make the effort to get out and around.

    As a (youngish) adult, being an expat has been great. I've been in China for about 6 years now and have gotten opportunities that would never have been available back in the states. From a career standpoint I don't think you'll be isolated at all.

    Generally speaking there are three types who end up as expats. Those who couldn't make it back home and needed an escape, those who are badly needed abroad by their companies, and those who are talented but just interested in doing something a little different. Point being you'll meet some interesting people as well as plenty that you'll be able to do without but I guess that's true everywhere.

    One issue that I've noticed with expat families who have come over due to one partner's employment is that the husband or wife who tags along can feel a bit lost so it's important to get employment and or involvement in local clubs and community events sorted out sooner rather than later. That's obviously dependent on the person though and I know nothing about you or our wife so I can't say that it applies.

    In any case very, very cool opportunity!

  17. #17
    I like waterboarding...
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    HowNow -- Thanks for the insight. The wife would definitely need to get out and integrate a bit. She is, understandably, a little apprehensive about putting our 3yo into an International preschool etc... Its going to end up being an evolutionary process for her.

    I'll keep you guys posted!
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  18. #18
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    Missed this one so here's some information

    I've been expat now for twelve years, six in the UK and six in Asia, four in Shanghai and coming up on two in Singapore, all for the same US company. Go semi-localised recently and all the goodies dropped away although they kept me on US payroll for pension and 401(k) reasons.

    Where in Indonesia? It has a multitude of locations so that would be my first question although many people start in Jakarta and then head out from there.

    Assuming they keep you on US payroll, make sure that you're either tax equalised or your US pay and all other benefits including housing and other fringes are like wise grossed up or covered by tax EQ.

    See if they're paying a premium location for Indonesia. Most multi-nationals are still doing so. Home leave, negotiate for what you can get but at a minimum, one trip per year covering you and your spouse. If you can get it for B class, so much the better.

    Global health insurance. Make sure they have some sort of program within the company or will pay for healthcare treatment, facilities and medicine up to Western standards. Meds are important as there are a rash of counterfeits when it comes to medication. Same for doctors and facilities.

    Go for cultural training. It's worth spending at least a day doing it, both you and your spouse. If she has interests and activities, make sure that she can pursue them in Indonesia. Also, research expat groups. Great to go local but if you don't speak the local language dialect, it can be tough sledding. Also see if they will pay for language training for you and your spouse.

    Make sure that they pay for time to find a place, usually one week for a "look see" trip and that they cover the real estate agent and preferably, one that specialises in expats. Moving and relo costs. Most cover moving costs, US storage costs and real estate management fees if you have a house/flat in the US that you will rent out. Also make sure that your agreement includes repatriation costs back to the US at the end of your assignment. Ideally you can negotiate the repatriation under any condition including resignation/change of terms but good luck on that one.

    Work permits. Make sure that the costs are covered and potentially getting one for your wife if she works or will consider working. There's a lot of paper work and cost involved depending on country.

    Other considerations. Where will your manager be and how much will you have to deal with the States. Anyone who has worked for a US based company will tell you that what kills them is not the stupid emails from your US-centric manager but the Tcons. If you have to dial into Asia-US-Europe calls, Asia's usually the loser with midnight or pre-dawn starts. The calls will wear on you and if you've never done it, just beware. Calling schedules from when I was in Europe look good to me now. If your manager is local or in Asia, you've got it made.

    There's more but that's it off the top of my head. If you want more, PM me and I can send you some stuff over the weekend as I'm on a two week trip in Australia.

    Good luck, with the right deal it will be a great experience.

    Quote Originally Posted by mymilkexpired
    So I went to dinner this evening with the new CEO of our company. I got the impression from some of our conversations that I was being felt out. Long story short on the history of our company is, 3 years into a our drilling program our investors forced us to close up two of our offices and move everything into our Indonesia office where we're operating from.

    This essentially terminates my employment in Houston effective sometime around the end of March. So circle back to dinner, I got a strong feeling that I was being screen to see if I'd expat out to Indonesia for an undefined period of time...

    Given my future employment situation, the lack there of, would you consider relocating your family to continue on with your current post rather than seek new employment? I dont have much in the way of things holding me back to Houston other than convincing the wife to pack up our stuff and move... There are our dogs but we can just eat them before we leave.

    If you're an expat or where at some point, you have any advice to offer?
    i've got limited minutes left in life, don't waste my time

  19. #19
    hit it
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    A friend (coworker) and his wife are both in Jakarta right now. They are road & mtn bikers (she is stooopid fast on an mtb, drops me like a bad habit). If'n you are going to ride over there, maybe I can hook you up with them.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scotty2Hotty View Post
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  20. #20
    Ricardo Cabeza
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    yes. it might be a tough sell on the missiz, but if passing it up meant a drastically reduced standard of living, that would be a help in making the decision.

    Living abroad would be an awesome experience for the kids. Education might be challenging but there are plenty of ways to address that.
    Whenever the legislators endeavour to take away and destroy the property of the people, or to reduce them to slavery under arbitrary power, they put themselves into a state of war with the people who are thereupon absolved from any further obedience, and are left to the common refuge which God hath provided for all men against force and violence - John Locke

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  21. #21
    Frog Whisperer
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    so you gonna take over TerryB's midnight shift?
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right......

  22. #22
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    It worked for Obama.

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