Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 30
  1. #1
    ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
    Reputation: old_fuji's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    6,483

    Horticulturists and other plant enthusiasts, enquire within

    Who's got a garden going this year?

    I adapted an idea that my wife got off of Pinterest, where you take a pallet, line the insides with landscape fabric, then fill it with potting or gardening soil and use that as a modular planter...gotta experiment a little, since the yard we have doesn't get a whole heckuva lot of sunshine, but we have plants in the dirt!

    Going back 2 years ago, we just did potted plants...I think we had 4 pepper plants, and what a bountiful harvest that was! We got 2 gallon-sized Ziploc bags full of habaneros, jalapenos, and chilis. Last year, we had a smaller pallet garden, and introduced tomatoes and bell peppers into the mix. It didn't go so well; we only got maybe a dozen cherry tomatoes, and 1 lonely regular tomato. We only pickled one jar of peppers as well.

    This year, I've upped the ante with 4 types of tomatoes (Black Prince, heirloom cherry, regular cherry, and red beefsteak), 4 peppers (jalapeno, habanero, cubanelle, and super chili), and to boot, we've got a sweet basil plant and a little promotional packet of wildflowers that I threw in for shiggles. So, we'll see how this year's harvest turns out. I had hoped to have it in about 3 weeks ago, but time didn't work out...with my new job, I'm working weekends, so that bites into the time I'd normally take to go to the various farmers' markets in the area to buy plants.

    So, what do you moreons/lounjers have in your gardens this year?
    I lost my phone number. Can I have yours?

  2. #2
    Pooped a refrigerator.
    Reputation: SauronHimself's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    6,659
    Cherry tomatoes are some of my favorites, and they're very easy to grow so long as you give them enough fertilizer. They do, however, need to be tied off to takes or placed against some lattice structure so they can vine out more. I'm also a big fan of hot peppers. I normally do jalapenos, hot banana, and habanero. This year I'm also trying my hand at Carolina reapers. If you want good yield, make sure to top your pepper plants when they develop the first Y-shape. It's painful at first, but you'll wind up with a sturdier plant and triple the yield.

    Some other very easy crops I like are snow peas and green beans. They can grow in sandy, malnourished soil and still thrive. I've had success with sugar baby watermelons, eggplant, and broccoli (good cold weather crop). The one vegetable I've had the most problems with is pumpkins. You have to plant them very early (best to start indoors), and then you wait a long time to get the rare female flowers which then must be pollinated with the male flowers. Then you hope for the best that some of them actually fertilized.
    Ghurarmu shirkush’ agh azgushu. Zant ya apakurizak. Gűl-n’ anakhizak.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: mtrac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    813
    I live in an apartment, so everything is in containers. Edibles are horseradish, chives, and rosemary.
    It's Mueller Time

  4. #4
    Master debator.
    Reputation: nOOky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    8,153
    We only plant things we like to eat, sounds ironic I know. Around here tomatoes, cukes, kohlrabi, sweet corn all can usually be had from others that grow too much.

    We grow sun sugar cherry tomatoes and regular red cherry tomatoes in 5 gallon pails hanging from a support so they just grow towards the ground and you can pick then easily. We have winter squash growing, zucchini, egg plant, sweet potatoes, and sweet peppers.
    "I felt bad because I couldn't wheelie; until I met a man with no bicycle"

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,504
    I wish I had some photos of my garden/yard as that's one of my hobbies and it's really starting to come together this year.

    My veggie garden has 5 raised beds, each measuring about 4' x 7'. One bed has tomatoes and peppers, another has misc. salad greens, another is full of onions and garlic, another has beets, carrots, and radishes, and the last one has herbs and more salad greens. There's some snow peas in there too.

  6. #6
    ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
    Reputation: old_fuji's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    6,483
    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    We only plant things we like to eat, sounds ironic I know. Around here tomatoes, cukes, kohlrabi, sweet corn all can usually be had from others that grow too much.

    We grow sun sugar cherry tomatoes and regular red cherry tomatoes in 5 gallon pails hanging from a support so they just grow towards the ground and you can pick then easily. We have winter squash growing, zucchini, egg plant, sweet potatoes, and sweet peppers.
    I know, I can take you past thousands of acres of corn...but don't both corn and cukes take a metric buttload of water? Seems like we tried to grow corn when I was a lad, but it never took off, despite having buckets of stringbeans and tomatoes...
    I lost my phone number. Can I have yours?

  7. #7
    Crusty AF
    Reputation: drussell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,212
    We moved last fall. Old place (small suburban yard) was sunbaked in spots, and well-shaded in others, which led to a nice variety of stuff - tomatoes and sunflowers against one fence, and other herbs/veg along the garage with the same aspect. Hydrangeas along the back fence with nice little shade/woodland plantings underneath (trilliums, bunchberry, wintergreen), and massive hostas lining the deck along the opposite fence to the veg, where there was a lot of shade. In the front, I had all kinds of flowers which came up at different times throughout the spring and summer. I do miss that yard for all of its variety in a relatively small space.

    New house has a massive silver maple in front, and massive black walnut in the back. We decided to live with the yard for a year to see what it's like at various times, before we decide on any landscaping (just grass right now). I think I'll be able to get away with some early- to mid-spring flowers, as the walnut doesn't leaf out until late May/early June (there's the whole juglone thing to deal with too, though). Not much sun back there by now though, so I'm thinking a lot of shade tolerant stuff - hostas, ferns, some Solomon's Seal and other native plantings (which are juglone tolerant).

    We've got some lavender, mini dahlias and a few other colourful things in pots on the back steps. They seem to be doing ok so far with 3-4 h of direct light. We'll see how the summer goes...The driveway is at the back of the yard off a cross-street. I may be able to do tomatoes in planters there, or maybe a built-in raised bed/planter for lavender or bougainvillea - more than enough sunlight there, and would be nice to look when you come home from work.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kai Winters View Post
    It's all about the legs, lungs, heart and soul. The gear comes after that.

  8. #8
    Master debator.
    Reputation: nOOky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    8,153
    Quote Originally Posted by old_fuji View Post
    I know, I can take you past thousands of acres of corn...but don't both corn and cukes take a metric buttload of water? Seems like we tried to grow corn when I was a lad, but it never took off, despite having buckets of stringbeans and tomatoes...

    Generally we put black plastic sheeting over our garden, and then take a torch and pop holes in the plastic and plant. Less weeds, the ground stays warmer and moister etc. We never water except if it goes weeks without.
    "I felt bad because I couldn't wheelie; until I met a man with no bicycle"

  9. #9
    ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
    Reputation: old_fuji's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    6,483
    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    Generally we put black plastic sheeting over our garden, and then take a torch and pop holes in the plastic and plant. Less weeds, the ground stays warmer and moister etc. We never water except if it goes weeks without.
    Hey, not a bad idea!
    I lost my phone number. Can I have yours?

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PJay's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    1,933
    My wife nominated the pallet idea.

    I got scared of the preservative chemicals that might be in the pallet.

    So, I gave the ix-nay on the allet-pay.

    We just form any ol' give-away bricks into a garden wall, 2-3 rows high, fill with soil, put weed barrier on top, and plant.

    Please don't tell me bricks have hazardous chemicals.

  11. #11
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Christine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    15,012
    Got about three tomato plants, think they're all grape tomato. One is starting to fruit already, five teeny tomatoes so far.

    Nice bunch of herbs- dill, rosemary, basil, parsley, sage, and mint. The mint started creeping into my yard from my neighbor's, so I just ripped some up and planted it in a giant pot. Already made a whole bunch of mint syrup.

    Got some wild garlic/onions as well, those just plant themselves. Not sure how to use them, sometimes I just cut up the green part for salads and such.

    Planted some radish parts for the heck of it, not sure how those are doing.

    Coral bells, astilbe (sp?) and various bulbs, especially the day lilies, are thriving.

    Not sure what to do with my azaleas, they're somewhat anemic on the north side. Might dig them up and put them in the back where there's more sun.

    Want to plant some succulents and see what happens, they might do okay on the north side, ideally put them in boxes of some kind on the sunny wall space, but that's a bit tricky.

  12. #12
    Master debator.
    Reputation: nOOky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    8,153
    Quote Originally Posted by old_fuji View Post
    Hey, not a bad idea!
    Nope it isn't, plenty of people do it. Seems to work well for us.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Horticulturists and other plant enthusiasts, enquire within-2012-08-31_18-06-27_781.jpg  
    "I felt bad because I couldn't wheelie; until I met a man with no bicycle"

  13. #13
    Crusty AF
    Reputation: drussell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,212
    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    Nope it isn't, plenty of people do it. Seems to work well for us.
    Those look terrible - I wouldn't serve them to my worst enemy.

    Send them to me and I'll dispose of them for you.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kai Winters View Post
    It's all about the legs, lungs, heart and soul. The gear comes after that.

  14. #14
    half-fast
    Reputation: 10ae1203's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    7,138
    Horticulturists and other plant enthusiasts, enquire within-2017-06-20-13.41.00.jpg

    I'm not the gardener. Mrs. 10 ae is the gardener. She put about 4 tons of garden soil in there after I ran the tiller.

    I just dig holes and carry stuff. I did make the gate, though. I don't seem to mind yardwork at the new place.

    This is food and flowers both. Fence is for rabbits and Rocky, but Rocky did get a tomato plant of his own on the outside.
    Last edited by 10ae1203; 06-20-2017 at 09:59 AM.

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,504
    Please don't tell me bricks have hazardous chemicals.

    If they were previously used as a smelter smokestack they probably do.

  16. #16
    half-fast
    Reputation: 10ae1203's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    7,138
    Quote Originally Posted by dir-t View Post
    Please don't tell me bricks have hazardous chemicals.

    If they were previously used as a smelter smokestack they probably do.
    Or painted with lead paint.

  17. #17
    Master debator.
    Reputation: nOOky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    8,153
    Quote Originally Posted by drussell View Post
    Those look terrible - I wouldn't serve them to my worst enemy.

    Send them to me and I'll dispose of them for you.

    There were so many romas that year we let most of them rot. Sad.
    "I felt bad because I couldn't wheelie; until I met a man with no bicycle"

  18. #18
    half-fast
    Reputation: 10ae1203's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    7,138
    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    There were so many romas that year we let most of them rot. Sad.
    Dogs help with this.

  19. #19
    ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
    Reputation: old_fuji's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    6,483
    What are you guys using for fertilizer, if anything at all? I bought the pre-fertilized veggie/plant mix soil, then some Jobe's organic fertilizer sticks.
    I lost my phone number. Can I have yours?

  20. #20
    half-fast
    Reputation: 10ae1203's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    7,138
    A little compost here and there.

    The garden soil was topsoil, aged spent mushroom compost, and sand, and we have about a 36" diameter compost pile going also.

  21. #21
    LWP
    LWP is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5,278
    I have a raised bed my wife used to plant flowers in. I decided to make use of it this year by filling it with mint, basil, sage and thyme. Went a little heavy on the mint so I have plenty of garnishes for summer tiki drinks.
    Crusty old farts are people too.
    - 10ae1203

  22. #22
    Frog Whisperer
    Reputation: Touch0Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    38,934
    Quote Originally Posted by 10ae1203 View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2017-06-20 13.41.00.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	141.4 KB 
ID:	319478

    I'm not the gardener. Mrs. 10 ae is the gardener. She put about 4 tons of garden soil in there after I ran the tiller.

    I just dig holes and carry stuff. I did make the gate, though. I don't seem to mind yardwork at the new place.

    This is food and flowers both. Fence is for rabbits and Rocky, but Rocky did get a tomato plant of his own on the outside.
    Dumb labor is the best job, when it fails, it ain't your fault!
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  23. #23
    LWP
    LWP is offline
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5,278
    The Lounge gardeners inspired me so much that I went today after work and bought seeds for chives, garlic chives, lemongrass and green perilla (shiso). I have a smaller raised bed I'm going to divide for the chives. The lemongrass and perilla will go in containers. That will probably be the end of it though. Gonna just stick with an herb garden for this year.
    Crusty old farts are people too.
    - 10ae1203

  24. #24
    half-fast
    Reputation: 10ae1203's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    7,138
    Quote Originally Posted by LWP View Post
    I have a raised bed my wife used to plant flowers in. I decided to make use of it this year by filling it with mint, basil, sage and thyme. Went a little heavy on the mint so I have plenty of garnishes for summer tiki drinks.
    Juleps at LWP's place.

    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    Dumb labor is the best job, when it fails, it ain't your fault!
    That's me, pick things up and put them down.

  25. #25
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,504
    If you'll allow me to be a bit self-congratulatory, here's a mini-tour of my tiny suburban oasis.

    Here's the veggie garden. I hope it doesn't spur any disc brake debates.
    Horticulturists and other plant enthusiasts, enquire within-img_1128.jpg

    These two shots look from the back yard fire pit area toward the front of the house. Native grass "prairie" to the left. The new "infinity" planter on the right is growing sunflowers and poppies this year but it may become next year's herb garden. The willow branch "zen fence" was inspired by a visit to the Japanese Garden in Portland, OR.
    Horticulturists and other plant enthusiasts, enquire within-img_1136.jpg
    Horticulturists and other plant enthusiasts, enquire within-img_1129.jpg

    This is the back yard. The square portion is "Connie's Square", the only piece of lawn my wife insists we keep while the rest of the lawn slowly transitions to xeriscape. The round part is "Shane's Oval" which is where we can all kick back around the fire pit. Note: the red chair is one of the original chairlifts from Bridger Bowl which I had made into a rocker.
    Horticulturists and other plant enthusiasts, enquire within-img_1130.jpg

    No gardener's place is complete without a compost bin. This area is the "boneyard" and also houses a the firewood pile and any scrap wood etc. from other projects. I'm going to build a twin to the compost bin this weekend using the left overs from my deck project.(photos at bottom of this thread Porch ledger board advice request)
    Horticulturists and other plant enthusiasts, enquire within-img_1131.jpg

    Entryway into the back yard. The hostas on the left are from my Mom's house back in PA. The raspberries on the left are just about to turn red. I'm not sure what that piece of trash on the ground by the berries is - I'll pick that up later today.
    Horticulturists and other plant enthusiasts, enquire within-img_1133.jpg

    The "other" front yard (house is on a corner). This is just some overgrown oregano and chives that made the move from my old apartment. I want to redo this part of the yard but it's pretty far down the list.
    Horticulturists and other plant enthusiasts, enquire within-img_1135.jpg

    I have about 80 feet of flax and rock garden along my fence. Also more raspberries. Veggie garden is inside that small fenced in section.

    Horticulturists and other plant enthusiasts, enquire within-img_1137.jpg
    Last edited by dir-t; 06-21-2017 at 10:39 AM.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Padlock enthusiasts, enquire within
    By old_fuji in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-11-2011, 08:28 PM
  2. Limerick Enthusiasts, enquire within.
    By Brick Tamland in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 12-03-2010, 09:16 AM
  3. Gin enthusiasts/Lounje Alkies Enquire Within
    By old_fuji in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 10-10-2010, 08:37 AM
  4. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 04-08-2010, 05:44 AM
  5. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-31-2008, 09:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •