Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Old and in the way.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    150

    I can predict the future.

    All I have to do is think about signing up for a fundraiser, and that guarantees it will rain that day. My track record is amazing, and the latest example was last Sunday, the Cycle for Shelter ride in MA/NH. Rain, and driving rain with 30MPH headwinds along the coast.

    Anyway, the ride is held on the 4th Sunday in July every year, so mark your calendars for that day in 2019.

    It will be wet.

    Anyone else have this same jinx?

  2. #2
    Huge in Japan
    Reputation: craiger_ny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    362
    I feel you man. I bought festival tickets for an entire summer one year. Rainiest summer I've been through. I've found the same also applies to advance planned camping and backpacking trips. As a regular sufferer of the firstworld plague I have also found that it tends to be sailing weather when you want to take out the motorboat and motorboat weather when you want to take out the sailboat. I hate that.
    Interwebs bumpersticker goes here

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Fredrico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    24,317
    Quote Originally Posted by dmanthree View Post
    All I have to do is think about signing up for a fundraiser, and that guarantees it will rain that day. My track record is amazing, and the latest example was last Sunday, the Cycle for Shelter ride in MA/NH. Rain, and driving rain with 30MPH headwinds along the coast.

    Anyway, the ride is held on the 4th Sunday in July every year, so mark your calendars for that day in 2019.

    It will be wet.

    Anyone else have this same jinx?
    If it actually rains you'll be fine. The rain will cool the body off nicely when working up a sweat. The water lubes the chain nicely, and it shifts as smoothly as ever. If it rains hard at the end of the ride, the chain will be squeaky clean ready for fresh lube. The tires will carve a line through the wet road and stick to the tarmac. And when it stops you'll dry off in minutes. Have fun, rain or shine!

  4. #4
    Huge in Japan
    Reputation: craiger_ny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    362
    Fredrico, come on man. Dude battled 30 MPH headwinds. That's enough to blow the lube off a chain along with the last shred of morale from one's psyche. In my world anyway. Bare minim having paid money for that forces one to make uncomfortable, masochistic level decisions.
    Interwebs bumpersticker goes here

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Fredrico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    24,317
    Quote Originally Posted by craiger_ny View Post
    Fredrico, come on man. Dude battled 30 MPH headwinds. That's enough to blow the lube off a chain along with the last shred of morale from one's psyche. In my world anyway. Bare minim having paid money for that forces one to make uncomfortable, masochistic level decisions.
    Well, rider is already rising to the occasion to ride one of these things, so why back out just because he's gonna get wet? 30 mph headwinds are an entirely separate issue.

    Commuted to work several summers in ETX., 6 mile and 44 mile runs. I could count on torrential downpours every afternoon, most of the time earlier than the evening commute. I can remember slogging up hills on literally streams of water, and in cross winds, and never did the tires lose traction. The only problem was visibility, so I couldn't go as fast. Yea, rain will ruin a social fun ride, but if you're looking for some challenges, rain qualifies! . Rider'll look back on it and think, "Yeah, that was SOME ride!"

    But ok, hurricane force winds, pelting rain? Sure, stay home and watch the Tour de France.

  6. #6
    Old and in the way.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    If it actually rains you'll be fine. The rain will cool the body off nicely when working up a sweat. The water lubes the chain nicely, and it shifts as smoothly as ever. If it rains hard at the end of the ride, the chain will be squeaky clean ready for fresh lube. The tires will carve a line through the wet road and stick to the tarmac. And when it stops you'll dry off in minutes. Have fun, rain or shine!
    If it was just the rain, NP. But the winds along the coast drove the rain into my face. I swear, when I went to sleep that night I could still feel the rain pelting my face. And it was cool, as well, around 60F, so I didn't need any cooling. Honestly, I'm hoping for better weather for the next one since I doubt I'd see these conditions twice in a row.

  7. #7
    Old and in the way.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    Well, rider is already rising to the occasion to ride one of these things, so why back out just because he's gonna get wet? 30 mph headwinds are an entirely separate issue.

    Commuted to work several summers in ETX., 6 mile and 44 mile runs. I could count on torrential downpours every afternoon, most of the time earlier than the evening commute. I can remember slogging up hills on literally streams of water, and in cross winds, and never did the tires lose traction. The only problem was visibility, so I couldn't go as fast. Yea, rain will ruin a social fun ride, but if you're looking for some challenges, rain qualifies! . Rider'll look back on it and think, "Yeah, that was SOME ride!"

    But ok, hurricane force winds, pelting rain? Sure, stay home and watch the Tour de France.
    One thing you say rings true (OK, it all does), that it makes it a memorable ride. August, 2014, day one of the PMC. Coldest and wettest day in the 35 year history of the event. Yes, I jinxed that one, as well. We took off at 5:30AM and the rain started at 5:31AM. And it got heavier as we got closer to our destination on the coast. -ing downpours. We also had a cool east wind hitting us in the face. 111 miles through that slop is something I'll never forget. 90 riders were treated for hypothermia, 9 sent to the hospital. In August! But quit? Nope. Never.

  8. #8
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    983
    Every step to prepare for rain such as bringing a fendered bike, carry a rain jacket or vest, greasing your chain like the Classics guys, etc. will proportionately reduce the chances in an inverse relationship based on how early you signed up. It will eventually reach the point that if leave all of the warm dry weather gear, bikes, prep at home, you will be riding in drought conditions.

  9. #9
    Old and in the way.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by steelbikerider View Post
    Every step to prepare for rain such as bringing a fendered bike, carry a rain jacket or vest, greasing your chain like the Classics guys, etc. will proportionately reduce the chances in an inverse relationship based on how early you signed up. It will eventually reach the point that if leave all of the warm dry weather gear, bikes, prep at home, you will be riding in drought conditions.
    Yeah, except this time, when I saw the forecast, I got ready for it. Rain jacket. Raceblades (fenders). My "winter" wheels and tires with Conti GP 4 Seasons. So i made the best of it. And other riders *loved* drafting me since the rear fender greatly reduced the rooster tail coming off the rear wheel. Drafting otherwise was impossible since you would only catch a face full of water.

    But luck does favor the prepared biker, and sometimes you get ready for nothing.

  10. #10
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    2,465
    If the weather is unacceptable to me, I just don't do the ride. The fact that I registered (i.e. pre-paid) to do the event is irrelevant. It's a sunk cost. Why put yourself through a miserable experience if you don't have to? If the ride was free, like a club ride or a shop ride, would you still do it in the rain?
    Insert something clever here:

    Insert list of every bike I own here:

  11. #11
    Old and in the way.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    150
    Quote Originally Posted by AlanE View Post
    If the weather is unacceptable to me, I just don't do the ride. The fact that I registered (i.e. pre-paid) to do the event is irrelevant. It's a sunk cost. Why put yourself through a miserable experience if you don't have to? If the ride was free, like a club ride or a shop ride, would you still do it in the rain?
    Sunday was a fundraiser, and I solicited donations. I made the commitment to ride, a promise to ride for the donations. Once I commit, I ride come hell or high water.

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Fredrico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    24,317
    Quote Originally Posted by dmanthree View Post
    One thing you say rings true (OK, it all does), that it makes it a memorable ride. August, 2014, day one of the PMC. Coldest and wettest day in the 35 year history of the event. Yes, I jinxed that one, as well. We took off at 5:30AM and the rain started at 5:31AM. And it got heavier as we got closer to our destination on the coast. -ing downpours. We also had a cool east wind hitting us in the face. 111 miles through that slop is something I'll never forget. 90 riders were treated for hypothermia, 9 sent to the hospital. In August! But quit? Nope. Never.
    I hear ya. Once rider commits to the inevitable, chances are body heat will keep him warm enough to keep going. A simple rain jacket takes the chill off if temperature drops.

    Something magical happens once the ride kicks off: hardly anything is going to stop it. Keeping going satisfies the survival instinct so well, riders burn out, get hypothermia and go until they drop. The French call it "courage."

    Have a great ride! Check us out on how it went!

  13. #13
    Frog Whisperer
    Reputation: Touch0Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    39,735
    i can predict the wind speed and direction....and for that matter, control it. If I head east with a headwind, one thing is certain, when I turn to come back, the wind will shift 180 and I will have a headwind on the return leg.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  14. #14
    Old and in the way.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    150

    No doubt...

    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    i can predict the wind speed and direction....and for that matter, control it. If I head east with a headwind, one thing is certain, when I turn to come back, the wind will shift 180 and I will have a headwind on the return leg.
    We knew about the weather in advance, and were prepared. But this is one of those situations where the headwind was much worse than the light tailwind we got on the return leg. Why? Along the NH coast there is no cover. Nothing to protect you from the wind and rain, so you're totally ex posed. We turned off the coast and had a nice tailwind for about a mile, but after that we were in some very protected, by woodlands, roads that weren't affected by the wind as much as the coast. I would have loved to turn 180 down the coast, but that wasn't the route for the day.

    I did have a ride a while back where I fought a stiff headwind up the coast, so I decided to split it into two rides, one up and one down just to see the difference in average speeds. The ride up? 14MPH average. Down the coast I averaged 24MPH. Really loved that ride. :-)

  15. #15
    Frog Whisperer
    Reputation: Touch0Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    39,735
    Quote Originally Posted by dmanthree View Post
    We knew about the weather in advance, and were prepared. But this is one of those situations where the headwind was much worse than the light tailwind we got on the return leg. Why? Along the NH coast there is no cover. Nothing to protect you from the wind and rain, so you're totally ex posed. We turned off the coast and had a nice tailwind for about a mile, but after that we were in some very protected, by woodlands, roads that weren't affected by the wind as much as the coast. I would have loved to turn 180 down the coast, but that wasn't the route for the day.

    I did have a ride a while back where I fought a stiff headwind up the coast, so I decided to split it into two rides, one up and one down just to see the difference in average speeds. The ride up? 14MPH average. Down the coast I averaged 24MPH. Really loved that ride. :-)
    I have done that, splitting the "ride" ...out and back. Just to prove I am not crazy. (been riding with gps since 2005, so I have lots of data)

    Turns out I was right......but no real evidence that i wasn't crazy. I was riding Wednesday, with a good stiff tailwind, I way clipping along at between 20 and 22 when out of the blue a bike passed me going so fast that I almost jumped off my bike to see why I had stopped.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

    "that was like trying to teach a goldfish how to play basketball over the phone."

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    55
    I think my dreams can predict the future. I don't really dream often. But when I do, within a matter of weeks, my dream usually happens in real life.

Similar Threads

  1. Predict The Future...
    By SystemShock in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 62
    Last Post: 04-23-2012, 12:38 PM
  2. "Can Crotch Length Predict Infertility in Men?"
    By Creakyknees in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 05-13-2011, 11:45 AM
  3. I can predict stupidity with great accuracy.
    By bigbill in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-27-2006, 09:41 AM
  4. Hey Steam, didnt you predict this?
    By firstrax in forum Politics Only
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-13-2004, 12:21 AM
  5. Number 7? Doesn't seem to hard to predict!
    By Stepan in forum Pro Cycling - Tour de France
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-27-2004, 08:32 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

roadbikereview.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.