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  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    There's the added danger of getting killed by innocent people trying to sleep with their windows open on a warm night while you rev the engine at the light or race your fellow moreons. All. Night. Long.

    Huge pet peeve of mine. After living in an apartment next to a straight stretch of three lane road near the park for a decade.
    Somebody started doing that in my neighborhood recently. Talk about annoying!

  2. #77
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    Yamaha V-Star 650.

    There's a lot of good advice (and concern) going on here. I'm still curious. Do motorcycles come in different sizes like a bicycle? I'm 6'2" and 235 lbs. and ride a 60 or 61cm bicycle. I saw a Honda Rebel and that felt like I was riding a mini bike. Then I saw this on CL. I like the style. Don't know if I'll feel scrunched up.
    You'd think we were here for something other than fun. - Ishmael

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood View Post
    wtf?

    All of them?
    Sadly yes, all four that of my friends that owned bikes. One got cut off by an old lady, lost some toes, was on crutches for 2 years, still has a limp. Another had a car pull out on a city street, tossed him out of his boots, still has a bad back to this day. Another overcooked a turn and wound up in a field, he's still healing. My best friend from grade school went off the road late at night at what was estimated to be 140mph. He's still dead.

    And yes, I still want to buy a motorcycle. I'm not planning on riding this thing at speed on the roads, there are a lot of tracks around here I can do that at. I am old enough (over 40) that I am pretty careful when doing things that can kill me. I'm not going to be splitting lanes on a motorcycle, I don't even do that on my bicycle!

    Thanks for all the advice about the first bike, I'm now considering the 250 even though a bunch of people tell me I'll get bored of it fast. I'm still mulling this over for a while longer, I may change my mind and just get a convertible sports car to satisfy my midlife crisis which is in full swing!
    “Bicycling has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world.” - Susan B. Anthony 1896
    "Cycling and ethical bankruptcy have always gone together." - Bike Snob NYC
    "White personifies this generation's obsession with superficiality, one in which a carefully curated social media post is more important than the actual ride" - Daimeon Shanks
    "I haven't %^&* like that since I was an altar boy" Hank Moody

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lotophage View Post
    If you live anywhere other than the west coast, it's kinda dangerous.
    Yes and no. You can't go full-on CA style lane sharing, but its doable. See below for why.

    In the midwest, it's illegal. And there are jacktards who will try and hurt you. Folks in the midwest who aren't used to traffic jams get pretty pissed at anyone who thinks they don't have to wait their turn.
    IME the cagers have their heads so far up their rectums that you're gone before they even know you're there.

    Every once in a while you'll find an idiot that's trying to be 'the lane police.' They're usually easy to spot. Last one of those I found I let him get almost the whole way into the next lane over...

    ...and then went around him the other way! They can't block both sides of the lane at the same time. He was within a few feet of the bumper in front of him so he couldn't do anything about me anyway.

    Note: I'm in the DC area. LOTS of transplants around here. Lots of countries in the world see MCs as basic transportation and riding them the way they would 'at home' doesn't raise an eyebrow.

    M
    I've moved back to NoVA. PLEASE change the weather!

  5. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrSmile View Post
    Sadly yes, all four that of my friends that owned bikes. One got cut off by an old lady, lost some toes, was on crutches for 2 years, still has a limp. Another had a car pull out on a city street, tossed him out of his boots, still has a bad back to this day. Another overcooked a turn and wound up in a field, he's still healing. My best friend from grade school went off the road late at night at what was estimated to be 140mph. He's still dead.

    And yes, I still want to buy a motorcycle. I'm not planning on riding this thing at speed on the roads, there are a lot of tracks around here I can do that at. I am old enough (over 40) that I am pretty careful when doing things that can kill me. I'm not going to be splitting lanes on a motorcycle, I don't even do that on my bicycle!

    Thanks for all the advice about the first bike, I'm now considering the 250 even though a bunch of people tell me I'll get bored of it fast. I'm still mulling this over for a while longer, I may change my mind and just get a convertible sports car to satisfy my midlife crisis which is in full swing!
    The wee Ninja is a hoot once you wring its neck hard enough. Its all about cornering speed and conserving momentum on the small bike. You don't need lots of HP to have a complete hoot on a bike.

    ...having said that... IF you're riding in freeway traffic, etc you may want to think about something a smidge bigger (500-650cc) to have some reserve power available for passing/merging/etc

    M
    I've moved back to NoVA. PLEASE change the weather!

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaeP View Post
    There's a lot of good advice (and concern) going on here. I'm still curious. Do motorcycles come in different sizes like a bicycle? I'm 6'2" and 235 lbs. and ride a 60 or 61cm bicycle. I saw a Honda Rebel and that felt like I was riding a mini bike. Then I saw this on CL. I like the style. Don't know if I'll feel scrunched up.
    If you're on the larger side look for 'adventure bikes.' AKA BMW GSes, Triumph Tigers, KTM 950/990s, KTM 640Adventures, Yamaha Super Teneres, etc. They're taller, with more room between footpegs and seat.

    As an added benefit, they're usually more upright with easier to steer geometry than cruisers and sportbikes

    HTH

    M
    I've moved back to NoVA. PLEASE change the weather!

  7. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrRoebuck View Post
    I play games with people when I'm driving, but cutting off a car for payback when I'm on a moto just doesn't make a whole lot of sense. So yeah, I'm a lotion mellow. Still use occasional hand gestures, but rarely engage. Besides, usually the other party is usually history within a few seconds so nothing I can do will be as bad as them sitting in their car watching me get on with life.
    Haha, yes!! How refreshing it is to leave a problem behind and know that it almost certainly won't be able to catch up with you...life doesn't usually work that way.

    Truth is that here, despite all the uproariously comical driving hi-jinks that go on, most cagers don't have it in for two-wheeled vehicles--with or without engines--and will often go out of their way to leave the necessary space to get by them when traffic is dense (which in Lyon is almost always). The prevailing attitude is not "wait your turn!" but rather "if I could sneak by I would too, so why should that guy have to wait?"

    The other big difference is no turn on red, ever. That eliminates a lot of potential urban accidents right there. I'd have a hard time with that if I went back to the States after all these years.
    C'est dommage que je sois un ignorant, car je vous citerais une foule de choses ; mais je ne sais rien.

    --Hugo

    Living in France, le blog

  8. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy69 View Post
    This was mine: quick but not ridiculous top speed (I think it topped out at 105 mph). It was quicker than most other bikes at the time including the Magna. I think the RZ350 was quicker.

    Great bike, I owned an 85 Seca 650 in silver. The only bike I ever regretted selling.
    1995 Waterford 1200
    1999 Waterford RSE-11
    Plus a host of old bikes too many to list.

  9. #84
    Jerkhard Sirdribbledick
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaeP View Post
    There's a lot of good advice (and concern) going on here. I'm still curious. Do motorcycles come in different sizes like a bicycle? I'm 6'2" and 235 lbs. and ride a 60 or 61cm bicycle. I saw a Honda Rebel and that felt like I was riding a mini bike. Then I saw this on CL. I like the style. Don't know if I'll feel scrunched up.
    If that's a V-Star 650 just be forewarned: It's awfully under-powered. Like I said earlier, that kind of makes it good for a starter bike, but you get on the freeway going 60-65 and you're vibrating like crazy and feel like the bike is going to explode. And in retrospect, knowing what I know about speedometers, I was probably barely topping 60.

    I had my V-Star for about a month before I got lucky; some idiot knocked it over in a parking garage. Because it wasn't worth much, her insurance company totaled it out. I got a grand more than I paid for it, right when I was feeling like I'd gotten the wrong bike.

    But I still dig cruisers ... they're just not practical for my needs (see above about lane splitting). I wouldn't trade my SV for anything else on the road, but the only bikes I stop and stare at are cruisers.

    Oh, and remember, it's just like a bicycle in that the upright position makes your ass unbearable after an hour or so. Set aside some $$$ for an after-market seat.
    "He groaned when we hung the rope over the tree but was relieved to see the white pinata."
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  10. #85
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    Well, on my birthday I decided to take the MSF class and I failed (I ran over too many cones, I guess). Funny thing is, my niece was taking (and failing) a MSF class on the same day too (only she was in Monterey and I was in Sandy Eggo).

    Personally, I know I needed more time to practice than the MSF class will allow but I don't know anyone who has a motorcycle I can practice on. 30+ years of riding and racing a bicycle but absolutely no experience riding a motorcycle. Could this be a sign that motorcycle riding isn't for me? I still wanna ride.
    You'd think we were here for something other than fun. - Ishmael

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaeP View Post
    Well, on my birthday I decided to take the MSF class and I failed (I ran over too many cones, I guess). Funny thing is, my niece was taking (and failing) a MSF class on the same day too (only she was in Monterey and I was in Sandy Eggo).

    Personally, I know I needed more time to practice than the MSF class will allow but I don't know anyone who has a motorcycle I can practice on. 30+ years of riding and racing a bicycle but absolutely no experience riding a motorcycle. Could this be a sign that motorcycle riding isn't for me? I still wanna ride.
    Slow speed handling is very different. Wheel tracking is similar, but the weight of the bike compared to the weight of the rider makes things much different.

    You should practice, and you should use the smallest moto you can. You should practice with cones, or plastic bottles/cups.

    This might help, or not, to identify issue you have. https://rideapart.com/articles/7-com...nt-rider-fails
    .
    Stout beers under trees, please.

  12. #87
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    No. Do it. You'll have a blast. Just go slow take your time and get to know your bike.

  13. #88
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    Since this is your first bike I would recommend getting a 650cc (small enough yet enough power). Also, at least in my state once you're licensed on a 650cc bike you're good for any size larger. 649cc and smaller, you'll have to qualify again if you decide to get something bigger.

    I absolutely recommend everyone (even experienced riders) to complete an MSF course. Some folks think because they have been riding for years that the instructors have nothing to teach them. Many of my instructors were Highway patrol officers and they shared many of their experiences (accidents and all).

    I bought a motorcycle 3 years ago and love it although I still log more miles on my bicycle. Funny thing is, I enjoy riding my bicycle alone but not so much on my motorcycle.

  14. #89
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    Get a smaller used bike knowing that you may sell it in a year or two (650 or smaller). Getting used to the shifting, cornering, & braking on a bike is easier to do if you don't have to worry about the weight of a large bike.
    While we are free to choose our actions, we are not free to choose the consequences of our actions. - Stephen R. Covey.

  15. #90
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    Sweet thread dredge! I had actually completely forgotten about wanting a motorcycle. Having kids will do that to you...
    “Bicycling has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world.” - Susan B. Anthony 1896
    "Cycling and ethical bankruptcy have always gone together." - Bike Snob NYC
    "White personifies this generation's obsession with superficiality, one in which a carefully curated social media post is more important than the actual ride" - Daimeon Shanks
    "I haven't %^&* like that since I was an altar boy" Hank Moody

  16. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaeP View Post
    Personally, I know I needed more time to practice than the MSF class will allow but I don't know anyone who has a motorcycle I can practice on. 30+ years of riding and racing a bicycle but absolutely no experience riding a motorcycle. Could this be a sign that motorcycle riding isn't for me? I still wanna ride.
    I took and failed BRC at Fairleigh Dickinson a while ago. Subsequently failed at DMV on a rented scooter after I put my foot down. Gave up after that. Couldn't practice enough to pass the test and failing the test means you can't practice. I mostly wanted something to commute on, and for seven miles a bicycle suffices.

    If you don't know another rider then see if you can find a scooter rental that will let you practice. Money talks. I also found beginnerbikers.org helpful. Finally, regarding a bike, my understanding is a 250 is a good starting point and is easy to sell to another beginner when you outgrow it.
    It's Mueller Time

  17. #92
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    About 20-30 years ago, I took a motorcycle safety course offered by the Pennsylvania DMV. If you passed, you got your M endorsement.

    The instructor in the class, an older dude who rode all the time, including yearly trips from PA to Alaska, had these words of wisdom:

    There are three kinds of motorcycle riders: Guys who are going down, guys who are down, and guys who are trying not to go down again.

    In my 44 years of riding, I've found this to be true.

    Prepare accordingly.

  18. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    There are three kinds of motorcycle riders: Guys who are going down, guys who are down, and guys who are trying not to go down again.
    In my 44 years of riding, I've found this to be true.
    This applies to pedal bikers too! So just how much risk are you comfortable with?

    Personally, I have never been down on the street moto riding. Now moto dirt & trail riding is completely different. Pedal road, probably 3 times. Pedal dirt, many times.
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  19. #94
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    I received my M endorsement in OH in 1972, sold my bike (Honda 350 Scrambler that I bought while living near the foothills in CA)) a few years later. Haven't ridden since then but still have my M endorsement.

    Question #1: Should I buy a new bike?

    Question #2: Do the make fixed gear motorcycles?
    If you focus on the past, you will never see the future.

    Every day I wake up is a good day!

    "I don't need another bike"
    - Anonymous

  20. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by onlineflyer View Post
    Question #2: Do the make fixed gear motorcycles?
    U can get a Honda Africa with a dual clutch system, nice bike, I may get one, a little spendy, $15K ish. If I ever hit the road for long trips, that is what I'm getting.
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  21. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiQuaeQuod View Post
    Slow speed handling is very different. Wheel tracking is similar, but the weight of the bike compared to the weight of the rider makes things much different.

    You should practice, and you should use the smallest moto you can. You should practice with cones, or plastic bottles/cups.

    This might help, or not, to identify issue you have. https://rideapart.com/articles/7-com...nt-rider-fails
    Thanks for the article Qui. That link seemed like it was written specifically about me! I'm 6'2" and at the range they had several bikes to choose from: Honda Grom, some sort of Ninja 250, a motocross type bike and a Yamaha 250. I picked the Yamaha 250 because it's the style of bike I am interested in (cruiser) but I felt bunched up on the Yamaha. I mean, are my knees suppose to be above my hips in the riding position?

    Anyway, the thing that I had a hard time wrapping my head around was counter steering through a turn. It sounds so counter intuitive. It became so much of an issue that when I ride my bicycle (now) I'm trying to be conscience of how I turn. Am I counter steering or doing the other one (where the rider stays upright and you lean the bike).
    You'd think we were here for something other than fun. - Ishmael

  22. #97
    I make Eagles fly
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    Rode for years, raced for a few years, ride for a few years after racing. Made a lot of great friends, buried way to many friends, injuries suck, the injuries still suck, I had the time if my life. Will buy another someday if my kids get into riding.

  23. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaeP View Post
    Thanks for the article Qui. That link seemed like it was written specifically about me! I'm 6'2" and at the range they had several bikes to choose from: Honda Grom, some sort of Ninja 250, a motocross type bike and a Yamaha 250. I picked the Yamaha 250 because it's the style of bike I am interested in (cruiser) but I felt bunched up on the Yamaha. I mean, are my knees suppose to be above my hips in the riding position?

    Anyway, the thing that I had a hard time wrapping my head around was counter steering through a turn. It sounds so counter intuitive. It became so much of an issue that when I ride my bicycle (now) I'm trying to be conscience of how I turn. Am I counter steering or doing the other one (where the rider stays upright and you lean the bike).
    Counter steering is so very slight that you may not notice doing it. If you ride a bike, you are counter steering every time you corner. If you didn't you would fall. The slight pushing of the handlebars in the direction you want to turn makes the bike to loose it's upright position and lean towards the push causing the bike to lean. Try steering (jerking the steering wheel) your car suddenly to the right and you'll feel the car lean right.

    The other thing is to look to where you want to go, not right in front of your wheel. So if you are doing a 360 turn, your head should be turned in that direction, not looking in front of you.

    I have a Yamaha 250 and love it, but I'm only 5'3". Looking to upgrade to a Vulcan S.
    While we are free to choose our actions, we are not free to choose the consequences of our actions. - Stephen R. Covey.

  24. #99
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    I took a motorcycle safety class when I started riding 30+ years ago. I cannot recommend it enough. I learned more in that class about road safety than I did in driver's ed in high school. The things I learned in the practical drills (on the motorcycle) saved my life, twice, within a few years of taking the class.

    Don't worry about failing the class the first time through. It means the instructors care about making sure you've been properly trained. Ask the instructor where they get the bikes for the course and if they are available for rent. If the motorcycle course is put on by a local motorcycle shop, then the shop will likely rent the bikes out for people who want to practice. Even if a motorcycle shop doesn't sponsor a MSF course, they may still still rent out bikes to people, or know where to send you, so check around.

  25. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiQuaeQuod View Post
    Slow speed handling is very different.
    Depends on the bike. Our local MSF group used little 250 Suzukis, IIRC. I aced all of the handling tests, no problem - felt very similar to a bike.

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