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  1. #1
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    LP's / old vinyl help

    Mom n Dad are trading down to a post-retirement house so I'm helping them unload stuff.

    Dad has a pretty good collection of old country LP's, some of which may be classics, others, not so much. But I did find Peter Paul and Mary's first album in there, and the record looks cherry.

    Anyway, should I ebay the lot, or do them individually? Looks like the preferred method is no reserve + shipping to cover postage. How do you ship these things?

    Other advice?

    thx
    Creak
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  2. #2
    eminence grease
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    See if there is a place near you that buys old vinyl. I did that (when I lived in MA) and made some decent change for those that were viewed as collector's items.

    Might make more on eBay but you have to consider your time and energy. You might also take a look at this list and see if you can gain an understanding of their value.

    http://kixsoftware.com/vinylresources.html
    You'd be better off with a netbook, they do everything better.

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  3. #3
    Devoid of all flim-flam
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    One of my musician friends has been making a surprising amount of money selling his LP's on ebay. It's plenty of work, though. He posts each one individually. He includes a photo, a description of the condition and a brief blurb. He puts them all up at an opening bid of ninety-nine cents. I don't know what he charges for shipping.

    In the past three months or so, he's been able to sell several thousand of his LP's. A few, (and he can never tell which ones they'll be), have sold in the hundreds of dollars. He's found that Taiwan is an especially rich source of well-heeled vinyl junkies.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  4. #4
    waterproof*
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    cool, there are some real gems in here, first editions of later-to-be-famous bands, and my mom has a big stack of 45's from the 50's. I'll try some ebay for a while.

    Plus I need to get one of those LP-to-digital converters because I want to save some of the music.
    * posted by Creakybot 2013 all rights reserved.
    * not actually waterproof.

  5. #5
    Frog Whisperer
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    Quote Originally Posted by Creakyknees
    cool, there are some real gems in here, first editions of later-to-be-famous bands, and my mom has a big stack of 45's from the 50's. I'll try some ebay for a while.

    Plus I need to get one of those LP-to-digital converters because I want to save some of the music.
    I have converted a bunch but I saw a USB turntable that looked MUCHO interesting.....read up on that, I think they run around a 100 bucks.....
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right......

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Creakyknees
    cool, there are some real gems in here, first editions of later-to-be-famous bands, and my mom has a big stack of 45's from the 50's. I'll try some ebay for a while.

    Plus I need to get one of those LP-to-digital converters because I want to save some of the music.
    If you have an old turntable, a decent receiver or integrated amp, and a sound card on your computer with a stereo input, then all you need is some software to capture and convert the music to a digital file.

    I use the Nero 7 Ultra Edition Suite, which has all the software you need. It will even allow you to clean up the surface noise and take out the majority of the pops and clicks. I have done several old LP's this way, and it works pretty well. But be warned, it can become very time consuming depending on how much you want to play around with cleaning up the noise and separating each of the songs into separate files, etc. It goes faster if you just capture each side of an album as one long file and then let the automated features clean up the pops and clicks. The automated function works pretty well at removing the noise, but I thought I got slightly better results playing with the settings myself. Or at least the results pleased my ears a little better.

    I found the Nero 7 Suite for about $40 or so on sale when I got it about a year and a half ago. Newegg has the Nero 8 Suite right now for $60.

    I hope this helps.

    Jay B.
    Treker
    'It is a good day to ride."

  7. #7
    Downhill Juggernaut
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray
    I have converted a bunch but I saw a USB turntable that looked MUCHO interesting.....read up on that, I think they run around a 100 bucks.....
    My Dad picked up a USB turntable. He started going through his collection when he got a Mac. Converted them all to digital. It was a time consuming process for him, but I know he's happy he did it. Has most of them stored on his iPod that he keeps in his truck.

    Now there's no limit to the amount of horrible music he can entertain himself with.
    If running were a person I would try to sabotage their life so that they were poor and drunk and living in the gutter pulling half smoked cigarettes from ashtrays in front of the Target. - Joe Daddio

  8. #8
    Frog Whisperer
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    one thing it is, is incredibly time consuming.....I use Sound Forge and record via sound card and stereo.....I record each side as a unit then break each cut into a separate track and send to CD....works well, and I NEVER use a filter..
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right......

  9. #9
    chaff
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    I'm an audio hobbiest and record quite a few concerts with my own recording gear. Only as a last resort should you use a soundcard for A>D they almost always have very poor audio quality. I'd use a decent turntable connected to a standalone mic preamp w/ analog > digital conversion, piping that into a soundcard.
    Also stay away from MP3 or other lossy audio compression; FLAC is lossless and works great for audio archiving and usually yields a 50% compression ration. Save those to DVD and make MP3s for your iPod if you have to. High capacity storage is getting so cheap that we'll lose the need for lossy audio compression eventually.
    An algorithm to remove pops is fine but a filter to remove hiss is bad, it destroys the fidelity. They're vinyl you can't expect them to be crystal clear like CDs.
    It is time consuming but I've done similar conversions in the past and once you do a few it's easy. Just sit back and enjoy the tunes while it records, don't fiddle too much in post processing.

    Paul
    Against logic there is no armor like ignorance.
    - Laurence J. Peter

  10. #10
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    vinyl

    audiogon.com is another great site for learning and sale purposes. I am audiophile myslef and my parents sould collection of the late 60-70's stayed with me and sounds great on my Rega turntable. You would not believe the quality of good vinyl played on a worthy turntable. Blow CD sound away

  11. #11
    Frog Whisperer
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    Quote Originally Posted by pchrosto
    I'm an audio hobbiest and record quite a few concerts with my own recording gear. Only as a last resort should you use a soundcard for A>D they almost always have very poor audio quality. I'd use a decent turntable connected to a standalone mic preamp w/ analog > digital conversion, piping that into a soundcard.
    Also stay away from MP3 or other lossy audio compression; FLAC is lossless and works great for audio archiving and usually yields a 50% compression ration. Save those to DVD and make MP3s for your iPod if you have to. High capacity storage is getting so cheap that we'll lose the need for lossy audio compression eventually.
    An algorithm to remove pops is fine but a filter to remove hiss is bad, it destroys the fidelity. They're vinyl you can't expect them to be crystal clear like CDs.
    It is time consuming but I've done similar conversions in the past and once you do a few it's easy. Just sit back and enjoy the tunes while it records, don't fiddle too much in post processing.

    Paul

    ok, I'm confused, first you say not to use a soundcard, then you say you use it....am I not understanding ?
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right......

  12. #12
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    Saba. Welcome to the forum. There are a surprisingly large number of audiophiles here, and I'm one of them. 5000+ LP's. 300+ 45 rpm singles. Sota turntable. Tubes. Room treatments. etc. etc. Flood your world with beautiful sound!
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  13. #13
    Frog Whisperer
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    Quote Originally Posted by saba
    audiogon.com is another great site for learning and sale purposes. I am audiophile myslef and my parents sould collection of the late 60-70's stayed with me and sounds great on my Rega turntable. You would not believe the quality of good vinyl played on a worthy turntable. Blow CD sound away
    IMO the difference between vinyl and cd is distnct too...
    Vinyl is REAL analogue sound.....bumps and lumps PRODUCE the bumps and lumps in the sound waves....on cd.....the sound waves are REPRODUCED....not the original, real thing....

    That being said...I wish my aging ears were worthy of my stereo......
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right......

  14. #14
    Coco Puff
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei
    Saba. Welcome to the forum. There are a surprisingly large number of audiophiles here, and I'm one of them. 5000+ LP's. 300+ 45 rpm singles. Sota turntable. Tubes. Room treatments. etc. etc. Flood your world with beautiful sound!
    Me three. Tubes are cool. I currently have a 300B SET driving some vintage Altec 604 speakers; and (my more modern system) EL34 amp driving some custom built Dynaudio speakers. I spent years doing SS until I just came to the conclusion that while it did some things really well, the tubes did it better in the areas that mattered to me. Plus they look so cool.

    Both are sourced through an SS pre that switches between vinyl, reel to reel, and two cd, with one of them being sacd. The sacd is closest to vinyl, and has great 'life'. The redbook is just OK, I could use an updated cdp. Nothing beats good vinyl, except good reel to reel ;-)

    As for the OP. Check EBAY for prices. Go to advance search and use the completed listings to see if any of your LP are worth the trouble of selling there. You might find it easier to off them in lots of 10 or so. Easier on shipping and makes it more worthwhile for everybody.

    The problem with old vinyl is grading and quality. If you sell you need to address that. What were the albums played on? A vintage unit with a nickel strapped to the tonearm to keep it from skipping? or something better? See, you have an advantage because you know some of the history of the LPs

    Some of it will sound great. Some of it will look great, but the mastering and/or pressing is substandard. A sealed NOS can still sound like doodoo. And an album that doesn't look so good can clean up nicely and be spectacular. You need a decent system and then just play a bunch until you see what I mean.

    RW

    BTW, the weird lines on the speaker grill are caused by the photo resolution and are not really there.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails LP's / old vinyl help-amsp-012.jpg   LP's / old vinyl help-amsp-010.jpg  
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei
    Saba. Welcome to the forum. There are a surprisingly large number of audiophiles here, and I'm one of them. 5000+ LP's. 300+ 45 rpm singles. Sota turntable. Tubes. Room treatments. etc. etc. Flood your world with beautiful sound!
    Something interesting I have noticed is that whatever new "hobby" I get into (in this case, cycling), there seems to be quite a few people around that have an interest in the other 'hobbies" I currently have or have had in the past. In this case the common hobby is quality audio reproduction. I don't currently have the money (or the room) for a high end audiophile system with tube amplification, but I keep wishing. And while I'm waiting I keep picking up vintage equipment when and where I can.

    Currently my vintage audio equipment includes a Denon DP-1200 Direct Drive Turntable with an Ortofon OM-30 cartridge, an original 1st generation Sony Playstation for my redbook CD player, an early '80's Kenwood receiver (it sounds much better than most of the current AV receivers out there), and a pair of Polk Monitor 10b speakers as well as a pair of Polk Monitor 7's. The Monitor 7's are currently hooked up to my 2 channel system, while the Monitor 10b's are in service as the mains in my AV surround sound system. The 2 channel system with the Monitor 7's sounds great to my ears.

    Later,

    Jay B.
    Treker
    'It is a good day to ride."

  16. #16
    Knives, Guns, and Booze
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwbadley
    BTW, the weird lines on the speaker grill are caused by the photo resolution and are not really there.
    Right you are. It is an optical illusion called moire patterning. It’s a rare phenomenon caused by the gaussian reflectivity of the relative flux hysteresis of optically-triggered magnetism of near-field projectioning schemes.

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